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Total Quality Management

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BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | February 10, 1992
As I've pointed out before in this column, Total Quality Management is not for the faint-hearted. It takes exceptional dedication on the part of staff, hard work, persistence and a corporate culture that values and rewards teamwork.If your non-profit organization is ready to institute a quality management plan -- making the customer the prime focus of business -- how should you go about it? I consulted several experts in the field for pointers."First the organization needs to look at their mission statement and their goals.
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BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
Clorox Corp.'s bleach-making plant in Harford County, conceived in 1990, has established itself as a corporate model because of one management philosophy that creates a near-fanatical focus on customer satisfaction and another that gives much of the responsibility for running the plant to workers on the factory floor.But when Levi Strauss & Co., the admired jeans-maker, announced plant closings and layoffs this year, it was partly because a management strategy that shifted factory workers into "teams" didn't work, leaving the company nearly defenseless against low-cost imports.
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BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,1992 TPG COMMUNICATIONS | July 20, 1992
There's a moment in the movie "Amadeus" that always makes the hairs on the back of my neck bristle. Young Mozart plays the piano before Emperor Joseph II. Salieri, the reigning musician of the day, is in the background. Mozart sits and begins a Salieri score. Then he starts to improvise, and a voluptuous burst of trills and arpeggios fills the air.I thought about "Amadeus" after re-reading a Newsweek story (March 1992) which quoted Robert D. Knoll of Consumer Reports: "The Americans are building nice average cars but few 'gee-whiz-look-at-this' cars."
NEWS
By Matt Witt | April 19, 1998
An era in labor management relations is coming to an end, and it remains to be seen what will replace it.In the 1970s, corporate executives and academic consultants launched a fad in management strategies with names such as "employee participation," "quality circles" and "quality of work life projects."By the 1980s and 1990s, these evolved into another generation of programs with titles such as "team concept" and "total quality management."What all these programs had in common was a promise that the days of labor-management conflict were over.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Staff Writer | July 28, 1992
State and local officials in Baltimore County yesterday announced the beginning of a one-year pilot project designed to help Maryland businesses improve their performance and competitive edge.County Executive Roger B. Hayden and Gov. William Donald Schaefer were among those attending yesterday's event. The project in corporates a philosophy known as total quality management, which emphasizes customer service, consistent product quality and employee involvement. The Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development will contribute $60,000 to the project, and the county and its Chamber of Commerce will provide $20,000 each.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | February 3, 1992
More and more non-profit organizations are recognizing that quality issues are vital to their long-term success. So why hasn't every non-profit board or CEO embraced a commitment to quality?At a recent Total Quality Management retreat put on by the Chesapeake and Potomac Blood Region of the American Red Cross, leader Jack Brown guided top managers through an informative process. The recent hiring of Brown as senior vice president for quality management reflects the organization's commitment to quality throughout its operations.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | January 25, 1993
It's no secret that I'm a die-hard fan of Boys and Girls Clubs. I simply do not know of any other youth organization that is as effective in doing so much for so many, generation after generation.This admiration is no theoretical thing for me. I've been to Boys and Girls Clubs in many states. I've seen the excellence of their programs and the dedicated, well-trained staff that deliver them with compassion. But, above all, I know about it first hand. I was a Boys and Girls Clubs kid myself many years ago.So, I was delighted to see the national organization's publication "Commitment to Quality," a workbook designed to help local clubs stay at the cutting edge of program service delivery.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
Clorox Corp.'s bleach-making plant in Harford County, conceived in 1990, has established itself as a corporate model because of one management philosophy that creates a near-fanatical focus on customer satisfaction and another that gives much of the responsibility for running the plant to workers on the factory floor.But when Levi Strauss & Co., the admired jeans-maker, announced plant closings and layoffs this year, it was partly because a management strategy that shifted factory workers into "teams" didn't work, leaving the company nearly defenseless against low-cost imports.
BUSINESS
By PHILIP MOELLER and PHILIP MOELLER,SUN BUSINESS EDITOR | April 3, 1991
When McCormick & Co. opens its new headquarters building at Loveton in northern Baltimore County this August, visitors might notice an old piece of stone set above the entrance to the new building.The stone, inscribed with the words "The two-for-one spirit," was saved from the lobby of McCormick's famous Tea Room when its old plant and headquarters at Light Street at the Inner Harbor was torn down.It was saved because Charles P. "Buzz" McCormick Jr., chairman and chief executive officer, wants that stone to be a tangible reminder of the cultural values that drive what may be Baltimore's best-known business.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | December 23, 1992
Anshen + Allen catches 'total quality' waveOnly a month after a merger, the San Francisco architecture firm Anshen + Allen is putting its mark on its new Baltimore affiliate, the old Hord Coplan Macht of Charles Village. The first step: a three-day series of seminars in Total Quality Management for the new principals and their staff."Anshen + Allen has been working on TQD (Total Quality Design) for some time," said Ed Hord, a new Anshen + Allen principal. "A lot of what I got out of it was communication with my fellow employees.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | November 1, 1993
The new conventional wisdom (flattening hierarchies, etc.), though far from conventional practice, is almost passe. Such is the pace of the global economy. Consider, then, these seven "beyonds":* Beyond decentralization. Most big companies decentralized years ago. On paper. Yet the market's demand for speed, innovation and responsiveness mocks yesterday's timid "divisionalization." There's a "surplus of everything," says ABB Asea Brown Boveri chief Percy Barnevik. The answer: Create spirited units obsessed with innovation.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | January 25, 1993
It's no secret that I'm a die-hard fan of Boys and Girls Clubs. I simply do not know of any other youth organization that is as effective in doing so much for so many, generation after generation.This admiration is no theoretical thing for me. I've been to Boys and Girls Clubs in many states. I've seen the excellence of their programs and the dedicated, well-trained staff that deliver them with compassion. But, above all, I know about it first hand. I was a Boys and Girls Clubs kid myself many years ago.So, I was delighted to see the national organization's publication "Commitment to Quality," a workbook designed to help local clubs stay at the cutting edge of program service delivery.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | December 23, 1992
Anshen + Allen catches 'total quality' waveOnly a month after a merger, the San Francisco architecture firm Anshen + Allen is putting its mark on its new Baltimore affiliate, the old Hord Coplan Macht of Charles Village. The first step: a three-day series of seminars in Total Quality Management for the new principals and their staff."Anshen + Allen has been working on TQD (Total Quality Design) for some time," said Ed Hord, a new Anshen + Allen principal. "A lot of what I got out of it was communication with my fellow employees.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Staff Writer | July 28, 1992
State and local officials in Baltimore County yesterday announced the beginning of a one-year pilot project designed to help Maryland businesses improve their performance and competitive edge.County Executive Roger B. Hayden and Gov. William Donald Schaefer were among those attending yesterday's event. The project in corporates a philosophy known as total quality management, which emphasizes customer service, consistent product quality and employee involvement. The Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development will contribute $60,000 to the project, and the county and its Chamber of Commerce will provide $20,000 each.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,1992 TPG COMMUNICATIONS | July 20, 1992
There's a moment in the movie "Amadeus" that always makes the hairs on the back of my neck bristle. Young Mozart plays the piano before Emperor Joseph II. Salieri, the reigning musician of the day, is in the background. Mozart sits and begins a Salieri score. Then he starts to improvise, and a voluptuous burst of trills and arpeggios fills the air.I thought about "Amadeus" after re-reading a Newsweek story (March 1992) which quoted Robert D. Knoll of Consumer Reports: "The Americans are building nice average cars but few 'gee-whiz-look-at-this' cars."
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | February 10, 1992
As I've pointed out before in this column, Total Quality Management is not for the faint-hearted. It takes exceptional dedication on the part of staff, hard work, persistence and a corporate culture that values and rewards teamwork.If your non-profit organization is ready to institute a quality management plan -- making the customer the prime focus of business -- how should you go about it? I consulted several experts in the field for pointers."First the organization needs to look at their mission statement and their goals.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1991
Engineering:William E. Kallas has been named vice president/director of marketing at the Irving, Texas, headquarters of Greiner Inc. Kallas has spent 17 years in the engineering company's local offices, most recently as manager of marketing and sales for the Northeast and Midwest United States. Barbara F. Johnson has been named sales representative for Ceiling Seal Inc., a ceiling tile resurfacing company and a division of Copeland Construction Services Inc., with corporate headquarters in Columbia.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | November 1, 1993
The new conventional wisdom (flattening hierarchies, etc.), though far from conventional practice, is almost passe. Such is the pace of the global economy. Consider, then, these seven "beyonds":* Beyond decentralization. Most big companies decentralized years ago. On paper. Yet the market's demand for speed, innovation and responsiveness mocks yesterday's timid "divisionalization." There's a "surplus of everything," says ABB Asea Brown Boveri chief Percy Barnevik. The answer: Create spirited units obsessed with innovation.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | February 3, 1992
More and more non-profit organizations are recognizing that quality issues are vital to their long-term success. So why hasn't every non-profit board or CEO embraced a commitment to quality?At a recent Total Quality Management retreat put on by the Chesapeake and Potomac Blood Region of the American Red Cross, leader Jack Brown guided top managers through an informative process. The recent hiring of Brown as senior vice president for quality management reflects the organization's commitment to quality throughout its operations.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1991
Engineering:William E. Kallas has been named vice president/director of marketing at the Irving, Texas, headquarters of Greiner Inc. Kallas has spent 17 years in the engineering company's local offices, most recently as manager of marketing and sales for the Northeast and Midwest United States. Barbara F. Johnson has been named sales representative for Ceiling Seal Inc., a ceiling tile resurfacing company and a division of Copeland Construction Services Inc., with corporate headquarters in Columbia.
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