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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | September 1, 1993
Do chefs really eat when they go home? Do they cook?Steve Sappe, executive chef of Truffle's Catering at the Belvedere Hotel, actually does continue to practice his skills at home, but makes sure the dishes are fast. One of his favorites is tortellini filled with cheese, garlic and herbs, coated with a quick red bell pepper sauce and dotted with slices of sausage.Although the creamy sauce would seem to very high in calories, there are clever ways to imitate richness. In this case, nonfat ricotta is thinned with regular or skimmed milk and added to a puree of jarred roasted red bell peppers.
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By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2011
With the Tortellini Boscaiola ($10), Pazani (a combination of the words pasta, pizza and panini) delivers a rich cream sauce that's remarkably pumpkin orange for a rose. This is a tenaciously clingy sauce. You could complain that the sauce isn't as silky as you might expect in a rose cream, but that's nitpicking. Any pasta style would work with this Boscaiola, but stick with the cheese-stuffed tri-color tortellini — Pazani presents it al dente. Boscaiola recipes can call for sausage or bacon.
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By Deborah S. Hartz and Deborah S. Hartz,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | November 1, 1995
Convenience products often mean sacrificing quality for timesavings. But that's not true with the refrigerated and frozen tortellini and ravioli available in supermarkets. These Italian pastas are a tasty development in the world of fast food.You can buy them with a variety of fillings -- beef and garlic, chicken and rosemary, mushroom, cheese and basil -- to name a few. They cost about $3.40 for a 9-ounce package (that's quite a bit more than you pay for dried pasta -- you can get a pound for about 50 cents -- but they are filled, fresh and quite a bit better)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | January 3, 2008
Giovanna's, the astonishing Italian restaurant dispensing homemade tortellini, delicious dirt-cheap pizzas and unbelievably good toasted subs, seems like it has been at the same spot on Harford Road for about 50 years. The restaurant, affixed to the side of the house where owners Maria Rosa and Valentino Grampa live, is so small it has room for only one booth and two small tables. Some outdoor seating expands the options during the warmer months, but most of the business is take-out. -- Poor:]
NEWS
By Marlene Parrish and By Marlene Parrish,Special to the Sun | December 23, 2001
Tortellini, pirogi, pot stickers, shao mai, kreplach, wontons and other worldly dumplings in the audience, please say hello to another cousin: pelmeny. Pelmeny, sometimes spelled pel'meni in cookbooks, are button-size Russian meat dumplings. They are folded, twisted and shaped exactly like tortellini. After simmering in broth to cook, they are tossed with butter, drizzled with vinegar and eaten as a main course. In Russia, and especially in Siberia where they are a staple, they're prepared in large quantities and kept in the "freezer" -- outdoors in sacks -- to last through the whole winter, ready to be cooked as needed.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 7, 1996
With a box of pasta, a few vegetables, a can of tomatoes and a tiny amount of chicken, you can whip up a dinner that has far less fat than most commercial pasta preparations. And, as fast as it is to prepare, speedy tortellini doesn't taste like fast food.Speedy tortelliniMakes 5 servings1 (8-ounce) package dried small spinach tortellini filled with cheese2 teaspoons olive oil2 cups sliced fresh mushrooms2 green onions, chopped2 cloves garlic, crushed through a press or 1/2 teaspoon garlic puree1/4 cup diced green bell pepper1/4 cup diced yellow or red bell pepper1 (14.5 ounce)
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | January 27, 1993
In the depths of winter, when the days are cold and dreary, yearnings often turn to comfort food, especially Italian pasta dishes. This homey recipe developed by a Roman grandmother originally contained more cholesterol than you would want to know; our "nanas" were bent on soothing with creamy foods long before cholesterol became an issue.In our version, chicken broth replaces extra cream and cornstarch is the thickener rather than eggs and Parmesan. Tortellini, a stuffed pasta often described as "little hats," is the basis of many stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | January 3, 2008
Giovanna's, the astonishing Italian restaurant dispensing homemade tortellini, delicious dirt-cheap pizzas and unbelievably good toasted subs, seems like it has been at the same spot on Harford Road for about 50 years. The restaurant, affixed to the side of the house where owners Maria Rosa and Valentino Grampa live, is so small it has room for only one booth and two small tables. Some outdoor seating expands the options during the warmer months, but most of the business is take-out. -- Poor:]
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2002
Fields of flavorful strawberries Strawberry fields don't really last forever, but strawberry season nearly does. In California, where 83 percent of the country's strawberries are grown, the season extends from January through November, with the peak in April, May and June. And with locally grown strawberries soon in the stores and markets, there will be plenty of berries for smoothies, pies and homemade ice cream, or simply to eat from a bowl. Eight medium strawberries contain 160 percent of the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C, and only 45 calories.
FEATURES
January 26, 2000
A party dip with a cause Kick off your Super Bowl party with Soy-Jalapeno Dip and help fight child abuse. The creamy blend, made with Kikkoman Soy Sauce, is a favorite of retired Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway and his wife, Janet, who are partnering with the soy-sauce company to raise money for the treatment and prevention of child abuse. Kikkoman will donate 10 cents for every 10-ounce bottle of the Asian condiment sold, up to $100,000, through January. Meanwhile, enjoy the dip, which makes about 2 cups: Combine 8 ounces sour cream, 1/2 cup mayonnaise, 1/3 cup finely chopped green onions, 3 tablespoons soy sauce and 1-2 tablespoons finely chopped jalapeno peppers.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | November 8, 2006
Jareene Barkdoll of Baltimore wrote looking for some "truly tasty" recipes that used canned salmon as an ingredient. She said that she usually makes salmon patties or salmon loaf but finds that they both can be dry and sometimes have a strong fish taste. Susan Petrie of Owings Mills sent in some recipes that she has enjoyed over the years that use canned salmon in different ways. Her recipe for Salmon Tortellini Gratin, an easy one-dish meal, seemed interesting and worth a try. Thanks to the use of store-bought tortellini and Alfredo sauce, this dish can be whipped up in no time.
TRAVEL
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 5, 2003
Today was Pasta Day at the International School of Italian Food and Wine, in Bologna, Italy. Mary Beth Clark was here. She's our teacher. It's her school. Andrea Merlini was here. He's the executive chef from Milan who, with Mary Beth, had been working with us on the art of turning mere ingredients into actual cuisine. Franca was here. I didn't get her last name, but she's the pasta chef from Tuscany, and she did the dough. My four fellow students were here. Earlier in the day, as we were warming up by creating (trust me on this)
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2002
Fields of flavorful strawberries Strawberry fields don't really last forever, but strawberry season nearly does. In California, where 83 percent of the country's strawberries are grown, the season extends from January through November, with the peak in April, May and June. And with locally grown strawberries soon in the stores and markets, there will be plenty of berries for smoothies, pies and homemade ice cream, or simply to eat from a bowl. Eight medium strawberries contain 160 percent of the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C, and only 45 calories.
NEWS
By Marlene Parrish and By Marlene Parrish,Special to the Sun | December 23, 2001
Tortellini, pirogi, pot stickers, shao mai, kreplach, wontons and other worldly dumplings in the audience, please say hello to another cousin: pelmeny. Pelmeny, sometimes spelled pel'meni in cookbooks, are button-size Russian meat dumplings. They are folded, twisted and shaped exactly like tortellini. After simmering in broth to cook, they are tossed with butter, drizzled with vinegar and eaten as a main course. In Russia, and especially in Siberia where they are a staple, they're prepared in large quantities and kept in the "freezer" -- outdoors in sacks -- to last through the whole winter, ready to be cooked as needed.
FEATURES
January 26, 2000
A party dip with a cause Kick off your Super Bowl party with Soy-Jalapeno Dip and help fight child abuse. The creamy blend, made with Kikkoman Soy Sauce, is a favorite of retired Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway and his wife, Janet, who are partnering with the soy-sauce company to raise money for the treatment and prevention of child abuse. Kikkoman will donate 10 cents for every 10-ounce bottle of the Asian condiment sold, up to $100,000, through January. Meanwhile, enjoy the dip, which makes about 2 cups: Combine 8 ounces sour cream, 1/2 cup mayonnaise, 1/3 cup finely chopped green onions, 3 tablespoons soy sauce and 1-2 tablespoons finely chopped jalapeno peppers.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 7, 1996
With a box of pasta, a few vegetables, a can of tomatoes and a tiny amount of chicken, you can whip up a dinner that has far less fat than most commercial pasta preparations. And, as fast as it is to prepare, speedy tortellini doesn't taste like fast food.Speedy tortelliniMakes 5 servings1 (8-ounce) package dried small spinach tortellini filled with cheese2 teaspoons olive oil2 cups sliced fresh mushrooms2 green onions, chopped2 cloves garlic, crushed through a press or 1/2 teaspoon garlic puree1/4 cup diced green bell pepper1/4 cup diced yellow or red bell pepper1 (14.5 ounce)
FEATURES
By Anne Marie Weiss-Armush and Anne Marie Weiss-Armush,Universal Press Syndicate | February 13, 1994
The new crescent moon on Feb. 10 marked the beginning of the Muslim observance of Ramadan.For a month, Muslims around the world abstain from food, drink, smoking and sex between dawn and sunset. An exercise of empathy and compassion, Ramadan helps people identify with the problems of the less fortunate.Refraining from all foods and liquids, including water, is a challenge to the body. The evening meal after each day of fasting should be filling, without putting a strain on the digestive system.
FEATURES
By Marlene Sorosky and Marlene Sorosky,Contributing Writer | December 6, 1992
If you think the holidays are a time to eat, drink and be merry, but preferably not in your own house, your concept of entertaining may be rooted in the '70s, along with quiches and martinis. In the '90s, anything goes. Stuffy rules of etiquette are outdated, and exhausting yourself to impress your friends is passe.Here are some sensible tips and recipes to help you plan a contemporary holiday cocktail party that won't wreak havoc upon your family, sanity or pocketbook. But keep in mind, organization and planning are key ingredients to happy hostessing.
FEATURES
By Deborah S. Hartz and Deborah S. Hartz,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | November 1, 1995
Convenience products often mean sacrificing quality for timesavings. But that's not true with the refrigerated and frozen tortellini and ravioli available in supermarkets. These Italian pastas are a tasty development in the world of fast food.You can buy them with a variety of fillings -- beef and garlic, chicken and rosemary, mushroom, cheese and basil -- to name a few. They cost about $3.40 for a 9-ounce package (that's quite a bit more than you pay for dried pasta -- you can get a pound for about 50 cents -- but they are filled, fresh and quite a bit better)
FEATURES
By Anne Marie Weiss-Armush and Anne Marie Weiss-Armush,Universal Press Syndicate | February 13, 1994
The new crescent moon on Feb. 10 marked the beginning of the Muslim observance of Ramadan.For a month, Muslims around the world abstain from food, drink, smoking and sex between dawn and sunset. An exercise of empathy and compassion, Ramadan helps people identify with the problems of the less fortunate.Refraining from all foods and liquids, including water, is a challenge to the body. The evening meal after each day of fasting should be filling, without putting a strain on the digestive system.
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