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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 16, 2004
Torque isn't a movie, it's an 81-minute soda commercial. You know those "Do the Dew" ads, in which handsome young guys and gals expend all manner of energy doing stunts that are clearly impossible (like the one where the car leaps over a guy's head and the driver reaches down to snatch a can from the guy's hand). Oh my, are they exhilarating. And at about a half-minute, they're just long enough. Torque is 162 of those things strung together, under the pretense of telling a story. What is thrilling in brief snippets is dumb duMB DUMB here; calling it brain-dead almost seems a compliment, suggesting there was actual brain activity at one time.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 13, 2012
Bobbie Williams remembers the many battles he had with the Ravens during his eight seasons with the Cincinnati Bengals, and judging by the comments made by Pro Bowl defensive tackle Haloti Ngata and head coach John Harbaugh, Ravens defenders haven't forgotten them either. Williams agreed to a two-year contract last Friday, and though he still has to rumble with Ngata and linebacker Ray Lewis during practice, he is excited to switch sides in the AFC North rivalry and make a strong push for “the major accomplishment that everybody plays this game for.” “It's a good feeling being here with a franchise, with a team that's known for being physical and known for being winners,” said Williams, calling this a “great opportunity” to win a Super Bowl.
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FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2005
So you're strolling the Inner Harbor, enjoying some mint chocolate-chip ice cream and minding your own business, when a toxic syringe whizzes past your ear. Mainliners! The bald, blue-veined villains rise out of puddles of blood, their bodies bristling with used drug needles. Welcome to Charm City post-apocalypse, a metropolis ravaged by monsters real and imagined, and the setting for "The Suffering: Ties That Bind," a new video game being unveiled this week in Los Angeles at the Electronic Entertainment Expo, a major industry conference.
SPORTS
By EDWARD LEE | December 28, 2007
Gary Stills set a franchise record last season when he registered 44 special teams tackles in his first year with the Ravens, and the linebacker leads the team this season with 26. Stills' fast motor is matched by his passion for cars. If you weren't playing football, what would you be doing? I would probably have pursued something like having my own construction company or being an auto mechanic. I love cars, and I like to build things. I am a car freak. In the next couple of years, I'm going to have a car farm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | February 20, 2003
EVERY NOW and then, I'm reminded of the limits of technology. For example, consider what happens when your corner of the world is buried in 28 inches of snow, as ours was over the past weekend. If you live in Minnesota, this kind of "weather event" is known as flurries. But here in the Mid-Atlantic, it happens very rarely - rarely enough that you've almost forgotten about the last really big snow when the next one rolls around. And you're surprised to find out what a pain in the keister it is. This time, I certainly thought I was prepared.
SPORTS
By EDWARD LEE | December 28, 2007
Gary Stills set a franchise record last season when he registered 44 special teams tackles in his first year with the Ravens, and the linebacker leads the team this season with 26. Stills' fast motor is matched by his passion for cars. If you weren't playing football, what would you be doing? I would probably have pursued something like having my own construction company or being an auto mechanic. I love cars, and I like to build things. I am a car freak. In the next couple of years, I'm going to have a car farm.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | April 19, 1994
Fast runners are born, not made, but you can train yourself to run faster by strengthening and stretching your leg muscles and practicing.To run fast in athletic competition, you have to run fast in training. All training is done by stressing and recovering. Run very fast on one day and slowly on the next because every time that you run fast, your muscles are injured and it takes at least 48 hours for them to recover. Try to run very fast two or three times a week. Run very fast over distances that are shorter than you normally run in your sport.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 13, 2012
Bobbie Williams remembers the many battles he had with the Ravens during his eight seasons with the Cincinnati Bengals, and judging by the comments made by Pro Bowl defensive tackle Haloti Ngata and head coach John Harbaugh, Ravens defenders haven't forgotten them either. Williams agreed to a two-year contract last Friday, and though he still has to rumble with Ngata and linebacker Ray Lewis during practice, he is excited to switch sides in the AFC North rivalry and make a strong push for “the major accomplishment that everybody plays this game for.” “It's a good feeling being here with a franchise, with a team that's known for being physical and known for being winners,” said Williams, calling this a “great opportunity” to win a Super Bowl.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2001
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Orioles third baseman Cal Ripken learned yesterday that he suffered a fractured rib while working out on Monday and will be limited for at least the first two weeks and as long as the first four weeks of spring training. Ripken described the hairline fracture of his sixth right anterior rib as a "little bump in the road" that contrasts what he considers a winter of uninterrupted good news for his surgically repaired back. Ripken emphasized he would be "surprised" if he were not ready Opening Day. "I guess I was a little bit foolish trying to catch that cannon ball," Ripken joked during a conference call yesterday.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1997
This morning Cal Ripken finds himself one week and two days into an off-season unlike any other.There is the usual reflection on a year just completed. But this time, it is accompanied by uncertainty about possible back surgery, a shuffled roster and perhaps another managerial ouster.Only one of those is under his control.He can pick up his daughter, Rachel, but can't play pickup basketball. Ripken now sleeps uninterrupted by pain and can fold into a car without a searing sensation spiking through his lower back into his left leg, the limb that still carries residual numbness.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2005
So you're strolling the Inner Harbor, enjoying some mint chocolate-chip ice cream and minding your own business, when a toxic syringe whizzes past your ear. Mainliners! The bald, blue-veined villains rise out of puddles of blood, their bodies bristling with used drug needles. Welcome to Charm City post-apocalypse, a metropolis ravaged by monsters real and imagined, and the setting for "The Suffering: Ties That Bind," a new video game being unveiled this week in Los Angeles at the Electronic Entertainment Expo, a major industry conference.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 16, 2004
Torque isn't a movie, it's an 81-minute soda commercial. You know those "Do the Dew" ads, in which handsome young guys and gals expend all manner of energy doing stunts that are clearly impossible (like the one where the car leaps over a guy's head and the driver reaches down to snatch a can from the guy's hand). Oh my, are they exhilarating. And at about a half-minute, they're just long enough. Torque is 162 of those things strung together, under the pretense of telling a story. What is thrilling in brief snippets is dumb duMB DUMB here; calling it brain-dead almost seems a compliment, suggesting there was actual brain activity at one time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | February 20, 2003
EVERY NOW and then, I'm reminded of the limits of technology. For example, consider what happens when your corner of the world is buried in 28 inches of snow, as ours was over the past weekend. If you live in Minnesota, this kind of "weather event" is known as flurries. But here in the Mid-Atlantic, it happens very rarely - rarely enough that you've almost forgotten about the last really big snow when the next one rolls around. And you're surprised to find out what a pain in the keister it is. This time, I certainly thought I was prepared.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2001
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Orioles third baseman Cal Ripken learned yesterday that he suffered a fractured rib while working out on Monday and will be limited for at least the first two weeks and as long as the first four weeks of spring training. Ripken described the hairline fracture of his sixth right anterior rib as a "little bump in the road" that contrasts what he considers a winter of uninterrupted good news for his surgically repaired back. Ripken emphasized he would be "surprised" if he were not ready Opening Day. "I guess I was a little bit foolish trying to catch that cannon ball," Ripken joked during a conference call yesterday.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1997
This morning Cal Ripken finds himself one week and two days into an off-season unlike any other.There is the usual reflection on a year just completed. But this time, it is accompanied by uncertainty about possible back surgery, a shuffled roster and perhaps another managerial ouster.Only one of those is under his control.He can pick up his daughter, Rachel, but can't play pickup basketball. Ripken now sleeps uninterrupted by pain and can fold into a car without a searing sensation spiking through his lower back into his left leg, the limb that still carries residual numbness.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | April 19, 1994
Fast runners are born, not made, but you can train yourself to run faster by strengthening and stretching your leg muscles and practicing.To run fast in athletic competition, you have to run fast in training. All training is done by stressing and recovering. Run very fast on one day and slowly on the next because every time that you run fast, your muscles are injured and it takes at least 48 hours for them to recover. Try to run very fast two or three times a week. Run very fast over distances that are shorter than you normally run in your sport.
NEWS
November 10, 2003
On November 6, 2003, KENNETH JOE BARRON, of Baltimore, MD, former employer of Foreman for a Tent Company for 9 years; survived by his mother Debra Barron and his wife Marjorie Lynn Barron. Also survived by Sheila Rice, Roger Rice, Sr., Roger Rice, Jr., Tommy Rice, Cheryl Spencer and Michael Barron. A Graveside Service will be held on Tuesday, November 11, at 2 P.M. in Holly Hills Memorial Gardens, Chase, MD, by Rev. Jim Lane. Burial in Holly Hills Memorial Gardens. The family will receive friends following the service, 913 Towson Drive, Abingdon, MD. Contributions may be made to 41 Torque Way, Baltimore, MD 21220.
NEWS
By George F. Will | October 21, 1999
WASHINGTON -- When Daniel Johnson, who is now 23, was transferring from Wake Forest University to the University of North Carolina, he went to Chapel Hill to find an apartment. When he called his parents in Hickory, N.C. -- his father, Wallace, is the pastor of the First Presbyterian Church; his mother, Sallie, teaches history at Hickory High School -- they asked him if he had found one. He said yes, and oh, by the way, I've joined the Navy. From his hospital bed in Walter Reed Army Medical Center he says he has no regrets about that decision.
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