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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 2002
BAGRAM AIR BASE, Afghanistan - Canadian troops and U.S. criminal investigators working at a grave site in the Tora Bora Mountains have exhumed 23 bodies that they suspect are those of al-Qaida fighters, perhaps a security contingent for Osama bin Laden. The bodies, buried in graves near the village of Al-e-Khel, might be those of senior lieutenants or security guards of bin Laden who were killed in an airstrike Dec. 15, said Lt. Col. Patrick Stogran, who conducted the search. "I am hopeful that it was bin Laden himself, but the chances are he wasn't there," Stogran said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 4, 2011
There was a very strange moment during Rush Limbaugh's radio program this afternoon. Rush, who on Monday caused a small media firestorm by sarcastically praising President Barack Obama (leading some of the more gullible members of the media to believe him), attempted to fuel the flames of conspiracy theorists who believe Osama bin Laden's death Sunday night was faked.  "I am convinced that bin Laden is dead," Limbaugh told his 20 million listeners. "I just don't know that he died Sunday night.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 31, 2004
WASHINGTON - Osama bin Laden, who has thrust himself into the American presidential race in its waning days, is probably still hiding in the rugged border region between Afghanistan and Pakistan, according to the U.S. military. It was through the snow-capped mountains in that region that bin Laden narrowly escaped three years ago, frustrating a military operation that has been a campaign issue for months. Democratic candidate John Kerry repeated charges yesterday that the Bush administration bungled the raid in the Tora Bora mountains to capture bin Laden in December 2001.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 31, 2004
WASHINGTON - Osama bin Laden, who has thrust himself into the American presidential race in its waning days, is probably still hiding in the rugged border region between Afghanistan and Pakistan, according to the U.S. military. It was through the snow-capped mountains in that region that bin Laden narrowly escaped three years ago, frustrating a military operation that has been a campaign issue for months. Democratic candidate John Kerry repeated charges yesterday that the Bush administration bungled the raid in the Tora Bora mountains to capture bin Laden in December 2001.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 2001
TORA BORA, Afghanistan - American and British commandos, operating behind a screen of local Afghan fighters, reportedly had the last remnants of Osama bin Laden's followers - and perhaps the terrorist mastermind himself - cornered here last night in a narrow stretch of a ridgeline, canyons and caves high in the White Mountains. "Al-Qaida is finished," Cmdr. Hazarat Ali, the ranking Afghan tribal military leader, proclaimed yesterday afternoon, referring to bin Laden's terrorist network.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | December 11, 2001
TORA BORA, Afghanistan - Afghan tribal fighters backed by tanks and U.S. warplanes mounted a heavy attack against Osama bin Laden's al-Qaida forces yesterday, seizing a key valley and pressing from three sides in a move to trap them on a rugged mountaintop near the Pakistani border. Al-Qaida troops responded with rockets, artillery and mortars, shelling the tribal fighters' positions and the roads they are using to supply their front lines. "Keep our fighters moving ahead," Afghan allied commander Haftagul, who goes by only one name, shouted into a hand-held radio to a commander several miles away at the front line.
NEWS
By Michael O'Hanlon | April 28, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Was Osama bin Laden in the mountains of Tora Bora in the first half of December? And did the U.S. decision to rely on Afghan militias and Pakistani troops, rather than American forces, to seal off escape routes from those mountains permit bin Laden to escape during the intensive bombing campaign of that month? If so, that decision surely ranks as the greatest mistake in an otherwise brilliant U.S.-led military campaign. Well aware of the stakes involved, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld has studiously denied any second thoughts about U.S. tactics during the Tora Bora campaign.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 19, 2001
KANDAHAR, AFGHANISTAN - The drive to find Osama bin Laden shifted yesterday from the exercise of raw military power to the art of human persuasion, as newly arrived FBI agents prepared to interrogate al-Qaida fighters who were captured at Tora Bora. American warplanes still patrolled Tora Bora and the mountains between Afghanistan and Pakistan, but - for the first time in days - no bombs fell. Bin Laden's whereabouts remained unknown and a formerly rich lode of targets evaporated. Still, U.S. officials said, many al-Qaida and Taliban leaders and fighters were at large in Afghanistan and possibly Pakistan, and they emphasized that many perils still confront U.S. forces.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - After weeks of uncertainty about the fate of Osama bin Laden, senior administration officials said last week that they had fresh indications he had survived the bombing assault on the Tora Bora region of Afghanistan and is probably still moving through the mountains that straddle the border between that nation and Pakistan. The administration is not claiming to have bin Laden cornered. Some senior administration officials say the evidence suggests that the search has "bounded his whereabouts," as one put it. But capturing or killing bin Laden looks like "a long-term proposition," the official said, and defense officials noted that none of the information has been specific enough for the United States to attack suspected hideouts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 4, 2011
There was a very strange moment during Rush Limbaugh's radio program this afternoon. Rush, who on Monday caused a small media firestorm by sarcastically praising President Barack Obama (leading some of the more gullible members of the media to believe him), attempted to fuel the flames of conspiracy theorists who believe Osama bin Laden's death Sunday night was faked.  "I am convinced that bin Laden is dead," Limbaugh told his 20 million listeners. "I just don't know that he died Sunday night.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Julie Hirschfeld Davis and David L. Greene and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 30, 2004
COLUMBUS, Ohio - The late-afternoon release of a new videotape from terrorist leader Osama bin Laden threw an unpredictable element into the tight presidential race yesterday, just four days before voters go to the polls, and sent President Bush and Sen. John Kerry scrambling to respond on a day when they had hoped to encapsulate the central messages of their campaigns for voters. In the moments after the tape was broadcast, both candidates rushed to make strong statements declaring their determination to conquer terrorists.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 30, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Osama bin Laden, in his first televised videotape in more than a year, declared yesterday that he ordered the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks against the United States and warned Americans that their security is not in the hands of either President Bush or Democratic challenger John Kerry. The video was aired on the Arab channel Al-Jazeera and replayed on U.S. networks four days before the U.S. elections and marked what some terrorism specialists said was an attempt to influence the outcome.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | October 22, 2004
CHICAGO - On Nov. 21, 2001, with the war in Afghanistan reaching a critical stage and American forces apparently closing in on Osama bin Laden, Gen. Tommy R. Franks got a request from his superiors that did not fill him with joy. Despite the other demands on his time, they wanted him to get to work on another task: planning a war in Iraq. General Franks, head of the U.S. Central Command, reacted as though he'd been asked to wear a pink tutu. As Bob Woodward recounts in his book Plan of Attack, the general was "incredulous.
NEWS
October 14, 2002
A YEAR AGO, the nation's fury focused on Osama bin Laden. He was Public Enemy No. 1, and the main point of the air war just getting started in Afghanistan was to overthrow the Taliban so that we could get a fair shot at our real quarry. The Taliban, overthrown, have drifted into the Afghan wilderness. Bin Laden never gave us the satisfaction of dying on the battlefield. He may have been cornered at Tora Bora -- but if so, he got away. Unless he died in a bombed-in cave. That is, assuming he didn't succumb to kidney failure first.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 2002
BAGRAM AIR BASE, Afghanistan - Canadian troops and U.S. criminal investigators working at a grave site in the Tora Bora Mountains have exhumed 23 bodies that they suspect are those of al-Qaida fighters, perhaps a security contingent for Osama bin Laden. The bodies, buried in graves near the village of Al-e-Khel, might be those of senior lieutenants or security guards of bin Laden who were killed in an airstrike Dec. 15, said Lt. Col. Patrick Stogran, who conducted the search. "I am hopeful that it was bin Laden himself, but the chances are he wasn't there," Stogran said.
NEWS
By Michael O'Hanlon | April 28, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Was Osama bin Laden in the mountains of Tora Bora in the first half of December? And did the U.S. decision to rely on Afghan militias and Pakistani troops, rather than American forces, to seal off escape routes from those mountains permit bin Laden to escape during the intensive bombing campaign of that month? If so, that decision surely ranks as the greatest mistake in an otherwise brilliant U.S.-led military campaign. Well aware of the stakes involved, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld has studiously denied any second thoughts about U.S. tactics during the Tora Bora campaign.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 14, 2001
TORA BORA, Afghanistan - U.S.-backed forces believe they have surrounded Osama bin Laden and the last of his hard-core fighters in a complex of caves between two valleys just south of here, a senior U.S. military official said last night. Although U.S. officials say they do not know bin Laden's exact location and acknowledge that he could slip out of the country, commanders are increasingly confident that a growing number of U.S., British and anti-Taliban Afghan ground forces have hemmed in the al-Qaida leader.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 12, 2001
TORA BORA, Afghanistan - American bombers laid a heavy barrage across the snowcapped mountains here early today as efforts to arrange a surrender of embattled Osama bin Laden fighters broke down. Although a turnover of weapons had been scheduled for 8 a.m., the morning began in confusion as mujahedeen, at first resting on the hillsides, began racing up and down the dirt tracks in pickup trucks stuffed with weapons. Commander Hajji Mohammad Zaman frantically waved back international journalists who had gathered near forward positions to witness the supposed surrender.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - After weeks of uncertainty about the fate of Osama bin Laden, senior administration officials said last week that they had fresh indications he had survived the bombing assault on the Tora Bora region of Afghanistan and is probably still moving through the mountains that straddle the border between that nation and Pakistan. The administration is not claiming to have bin Laden cornered. Some senior administration officials say the evidence suggests that the search has "bounded his whereabouts," as one put it. But capturing or killing bin Laden looks like "a long-term proposition," the official said, and defense officials noted that none of the information has been specific enough for the United States to attack suspected hideouts.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 30, 2001
WASHINGTON - The U.S.-backed effort to comb the caves of Tora Bora for signs of Osama bin Laden, his al-Qaida fighters and intelligence on terrorist attacks that might be in the works has made little progress and seems to be fading as a top priority, U.S. and Afghan officials said yesterday. More than 50 U.S. troops remain in the region, but they are not searching any caves themselves, military officials said. The Afghan militia members carrying out that task are relatively few in number, poorly clothed for scouring the rugged terrain in increasingly harsh winter weather and unenthusiastic about the mission.
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