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By Knight-Ridder | September 4, 1991
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- If you're a sentimentalist, chew on this: Baseball cards aren't going to be bubble-gum cards anymore.A spokesman for Topps, which has been selling cards packaged with gum since 1952, confirmed yesterday that the company has decided to remove the gum from its sports card products."
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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Everyone hopes for their moment of fame, but for Capt. Norm Bartlett, a Chesapeake Bay fishing guide, celebrity has been an out-of-body experience. Bartlett's likeness appears in the 2012 collection of Topps trading cards, one of 33 non-baseball luminaries including Michael Phelps , Arnold Palmer and Roger Federer in an otherwise all-baseball lineup. The card shows Bartlett - red shirt, tan cap, amused look - staring straight at the camera. But beneath the picture is a last name not his own: Kreh.
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SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | February 21, 1993
Topps is making up for lost time.It was out of the basketball card business from 1981-82 until this season.In the meantime, Fleer (1986-87), NBA Hoops (1989-90), SkyBox (1990-91) and Upper Deck (1991-92) put out NBA cards. And a generation of players has arrived whose rookie cards were produced by a maker other than Topps, which had ruled alone from 1969-70.Collectors who have wondered how Topps would have done basketball when Michael Jordan or Patrick Ewing was a rookie will have their answer in late March.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | December 26, 2011
Pro basketball Shuckers promote Topp to head coach The Bay Area Shuckers named assistant coach Bob Topp their new head coach Monday. Topp, a longtime coach and nationally recognized shooting coach, brings experience at the middle school, high school, community college and professional levels. He takes over the Atlantic Coast Professional Basketball League team after the resignation of Pete Corriero last week three games into its inaugural season. "With the majority of our schedule left to play, we wanted to act quickly, and we're happy that we have our best option right here on our staff," Shuckers general manager John Wolfe said.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | May 12, 1991
The premium card field is getting crowded.Upper Deck's first set, in 1989, featured higher-quality card stock than the baseball-card norm, foil packaging and innovative photography. They also had a higher price and card backs with a clean look.They were a hit with collectors of all ages.Then came Leaf, Donruss' answer to Upper Deck, which made its debut in 1990.Fleer is shipping its new Ultra line later this month.Topps had been rumored for several months to be joining the premium market.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | October 4, 1992
Regular or premium?If collectors decide to fill up with Topps, that's their choice.Again this season, Topps offers two grades of football cards -- its traditional regular line and its premium Stadium Club.Both sets nicely represent players covered by the NFL Players Association's licensing agreement. Topps will get you there economically, and Stadium Club does it with more style (and cost).These are football brothers of the 1992 baseball sets.Topps has 660 cards, and randomly inserted gold series cards that can double for collectors who want to try for the whole set in gold leaf.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
For Topps, 1996 is the year of Mickey Mantle. Series I Baseball featured reproductions of 19 Mantle cards.In Series II, collectors who find redemption cards have a chance to win the original cards. They are eligible for a drawing to win an original of the card reproduced on the redemption card.Topps says it got the vintage cards from hobby dealers and expects to conduct its drawing in November. Seventy-six original Mantle cards will be given away, including a 1952 rookie card. Topps says there is one redemption card in every 108 packs.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | January 29, 1995
Baltimore basketball fans are proud of their NBA players.The Bullets left after the 1972-73 season and the city's population has slipped to 13th, but Baltimore is one of the big cities in the NBA.Just ask Topps. One of the subsets in the 1994-95 Finest Basketball Series I is Finest City Legend. Its 30 cards feature players from six cities. New York (No. 1 with 7.2 million people) is represented by 10 players, including Chris Mullin and Kenny Anderson. Los Angeles (No. 2 with 3.4 million) has five players, as do Chicago (No. 3 with 2.7 million)
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
Next month, Topps goes retro with gum in card packs that sell for 50 cents.Topps put gum with its cards until 1992, but there were two problems. The gum stained the cards, and it wasn't Bazooka. It was a flat sheet of something comparatively tasteless that shattered if dropped.Those won't be problems next month, when Topps Bazooka Major League Baseball Bubble Gum Cards (will all these words fit on a pack?) reach store shelves."Those who used to complain that the gum left a residue won't have to worry," says Topps' Marty Appel.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | May 26, 1991
If inquiries to card dealers are an indication of interest, collectors can't wait for Topps' Stadium Club cards, which Topps hopes to have in dealers' hands next month.Topps' first foray into the premium-card market is a 300-card baseball set (Series I of two), with 297 player cards and three checklist cards.Availability will be a problem. The cards will only be sold in poly-wrapped packs of 12 (suggested retail price of $1.25), and stocks will be allocated."We're probably not going to be able to meet the demand," says Topps spokesman Timm Boyle.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Thomas Townsend "Townie" Hoen, who was the last president of the noted Baltimore lithographic firm of A. Hoen & Co. and inventor of the Plimpton Ball, died Saturday of lung cancer at his Owings Mills home. He was 76. The son of a neurosurgeon and a homemaker, Mr. Hoen was born in Montreal, Quebec, and raised in Cedarhurst, N.Y. After graduating in 1952 from Kent School in Kent, Conn., he attended Le Rosey in Rolle, Switzerland, for a year. He was a 1957 graduate of Middlebury College and served in Army intelligence at Fort Holabird and in Rochester, N.Y. He settled in Baltimore in 1960 and went to work for A. Hoen & Co., which had been founded in Baltimore in 1835, becoming its president six years later.
NEWS
By Stephen J. Hedges and Stephen J. Hedges,Chicago Tribune | October 14, 2007
WASHINGTON -- As alarm bells sounded for the second-largest hamburger recall in history, about 250 of the nation's top food-safety officials were in Miami setting the "course for the next 100 years of food safety." That so many U.S. Department of Agriculture field supervisors were in Florida while New Jersey-based Topps Meat Co. was scrambling to recall 21.7 million pounds of hamburger has rankled some USDA inspectors and food safety advocates. Several USDA inspectors said in interviews that their workloads are doubling or tripling as they take on the duties of inspectors who have left the department, not to be replaced.
NEWS
October 7, 2007
A month is too long. America's creaky and understaffed food-safety network is notoriously slow to react when food-borne illnesses erupt. The deputy commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration told a recent conference in Washington that the average delay between detection and public notice is three weeks - which he acknowledged is way too slow. But hard on the heels of that conference comes the big recall of Topps hamburger patties because of E. coli contamination. In two separate cases, lawsuits have been filed by people who say they were hospitalized after eating Topps meat because of confirmed cases of E. coli illness - in August.
MOBILE
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2004
Sunday was Little League Day at Oriole Park for the New Windsor Cubs. Forgive the fans if they didn't recognize the undefeated team from 1954. Instead of gangly kids in baggy uniforms, they were gray-haired granddads in matching T-shirts. On the front of the shirts: CUBS FOREVER. Fifty years after this Carroll County team won a pennant on its first try, the players still flock for reunions from places like Wyoming and North Carolina. Three still have their Little League uniforms, neatly folded and tucked away.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith James and Meredith James,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
They didn't necessarily hit for average, but they all knew a little something about defense and power. And while that won't get America's presidents into Cooperstown, it has gotten them into an exclusive new batch of baseball cards. Next month, each of America's 43 commanders-in-chief will join the immortalized cardboard ranks of Barry Bonds, Alex Rodriguez and Kerry Wood in the 54th installment of the Topps Company's baseball card series. But don't plan on snapping them up, trading them - or, God forbid, putting them in your bicycle spokes.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1999
Maybe they learned it from their kids.Wall Street traders caught the Pokemon buzz yesterday, swapping shares of the Topps Co. Inc. with elementary-school vigor amid word that the company's sales in Pokemon products could be twice what was anticipated.After Topps released estimates that its Pokemon sales could reach $100 million this fiscal year, investors ran the price of Topps' shares up $2, or nearly 24 percent, to a closing price of $10.50 on the Nasdaq exchange.The only things missing were the tennis shoes and the binders.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1994
In 1991, Topps celebrated its 40thh anniversary as a baseball-card manufacturer and rolled out its first premium set, Stadium Club.For three seasons Stadium Club had a distinct look -- the stamped Stadium Club logo, reproductions of rookie cards on card backs, BARS statistical ratings and a baseball-motif background on card backs.This year, Topps is going for style points. The Stadium Club logo has been redesigned and rendered in red foil. Player names look as though they came from a typewriter (first names in lower-case letters, though)
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | April 12, 1992
Ooops.Error, Topps. Card No. 1 of 1992 Stadium Club is Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken, a fitting honor for the American League MVP after a banner season. The picture is nice, too, as Ripken takes a swing. But on the back, his name is spelled "Ripkin."But don't try to corner the market on Ripkins anticipating a reissue of the card with his name spelled right. Topps is going to live with the error."Obviously we don't like to make mistakes," says Topps spokesman Timm Boyle. "It was one of those things that slipped through our quality control."
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
For Topps, 1996 is the year of Mickey Mantle. Series I Baseball featured reproductions of 19 Mantle cards.In Series II, collectors who find redemption cards have a chance to win the original cards. They are eligible for a drawing to win an original of the card reproduced on the redemption card.Topps says it got the vintage cards from hobby dealers and expects to conduct its drawing in November. Seventy-six original Mantle cards will be given away, including a 1952 rookie card. Topps says there is one redemption card in every 108 packs.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1996
Magic Johnson returned to the NBA last week, and he'll be back on basketball cards by next month."He's an active player again, and . . . as [an active player], [he's] automatically included in NBA trading cards," says Donna Goldsmith of the NBA. "They're all going to try to get him into the Series II products."Upper Deck, whose second series is scheduled for a late February or early March release, might be first."We'll definitely include Magic in the Upper Deck Series II," says Marilyn Van Dyke of Upper Deck.
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