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By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 6, 2002
TOPEKA, Kan. - City schools Superintendent Robert McFrazier stood on the playground of the modern Williams magnet school and gazed toward Monroe Elementary, a relic from the days of segregation that spurred the filing of the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education lawsuit by 13 black parents here a little more than half a century ago. Inside Williams, built at a cost of $4 million to meet a 1994 federal desegregation order, the classrooms seemingly mirrored...
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BUSINESS
March 4, 2010
TOPEKA, Kan. - Topeka's mayor says the city shall temporarily be referred to as "Google, Kansas - the capital city of fiber optics," in an effort to persuade the Internet giant to test an ultra-fast connection in the state capital. Mayor Bill Bunten issued the proclamation Monday after no city council members objected to the monthlong change. Bunten says the proclamation is mainly for fun, but that he hopes it will set Topeka apart from other cities vying for Google's fiber-optics experiment, including Baltimore, Grand Rapids, Mich.
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NEWS
January 9, 1991
Services for R. Virgil Parker, a retired layout artist for printing shops and a former resident of Bethesda and Reisterstown, will be held at 9 a.m. today at the Penwell-Gabel Funeral Home in Topeka, Kan.Mr. Parker, who was 78 and lived in Topeka since 1985, died Sunday of heart failure at a hospital there.He was born in Robinson, Kan., attended the University of Kansas and served in the Navy during World War II.Mr. Parker's wife, the former Pauline Smith, died in 1985.He is survived by two sons, David Parker of Silver Spring and Ralph Parker of Topeka; four grandchildren; and a great-grandson.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | November 11, 2007
TOPEKA, Kan. -- In the quiet shadow of the state Capitol, Bill Duckworth stands just inside the Tool Shed Tap bar and lets out a long sigh. He's a veteran and openly gay member of a community long unhappy about pickets by a virulently anti-homosexual religious group based here. But on this Saturday night, Duckworth says he's still wary about the biggest news in town: the $10.9 million judgment against the group, Westboro Baptist Church, in a Baltimore courtroom. "I felt like it might have been offensive, but that's their right," the 55-year-old printing press worker says of the military funeral protest in Maryland that prompted a deceased Marine's father to sue Westboro.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 6, 2002
TOPEKA, Kansas - Jack Alexander and Dean Smith played basketball for Topeka High School in 1949, but they played in different gymnasiums against different opponents, and they never went one-on-one against each other. Alexander and Smith were seniors the last year Topeka High had racially segregated basketball teams. Alexander played for the Ramblers, the all-black team, and Smith played for the Trojans, the all-white squad. Smith went on to a 36-year career as coach of the University of North Carolina Tar Heels that included an 879-254 win-loss record, two national championships, 13 Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament championships and 11 Final Four appearances.
NEWS
August 29, 1992
Melvin B. Gayle, who was training for auto body work in the Job Corps in Pittsburgh, drowned near there while swimming in the Allegheny River Aug. 17. He was 22.A Mass of Christian burial for Mr. Gayle will be offered at 10 a.m. today at St. Ambrose Roman Catholic Church, 4205 Park Heights Ave.Born in Kaiserslautern, Germany, while his father was serving in the Army, he lived in Tacoma, Wash., before moving to Baltimore with his family and attending Northwestern High School.His survivors include his parents, Adolph B. and Gwendolyn A. Gayle of Baltimore; a sister, Yolanda B. Newman of Topeka, Kan.; his grandparents, Leo C. Gayle Jr. of Mobile, Ala., and Arlene and the Rev. Gordon Wilson of Topeka.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 18, 1994
TOPEKA, Kan. -- Linda Brown Thompson's voice betrays weariness when she talks about school desegregation."It's disheartening that we are still fighting," said Mrs. Thompson, 51. "But we are dealing with human beings. As long as we are, there will always be those who feel the races should be separate."She was just 11 when her father, the late Rev. Oliver L. Brown, became the lead plaintiff in Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kan.Today, Mrs. Thompson, her mother, Leola Brown Montgomery, 72, and her youngest sister, Cheryl Brown Henderson, 43, say they realize that desegregation efforts have been glacial at best.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | November 11, 2007
TOPEKA, Kan. -- In the quiet shadow of the state Capitol, Bill Duckworth stands just inside the Tool Shed Tap bar and lets out a long sigh. He's a veteran and openly gay member of a community long unhappy about pickets by a virulently anti-homosexual religious group based here. But on this Saturday night, Duckworth says he's still wary about the biggest news in town: the $10.9 million judgment against the group, Westboro Baptist Church, in a Baltimore courtroom. "I felt like it might have been offensive, but that's their right," the 55-year-old printing press worker says of the military funeral protest in Maryland that prompted a deceased Marine's father to sue Westboro.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON | May 15, 1994
Washington. -- Four decades after Brown vs. Board of Education, it is a telling fact that two generations of the Brown family -- first Linda, then her children -- have completed their educations in Topeka, Kan., yet the public school system there remains segregated. The original Brown case, in fact, just went through a new trial last month.That has both symbolic and real-world meaning as the nation on Tuesday marks the 40th anniversary of the Supreme Court's historic desegregation ruling in the Topeka case.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | November 2, 2007
Maybe Albert Snyder will never see a dime of the $10.9 million that a federal jury in Baltimore awarded him against a Kansas church that picketed the funeral of his son, Matt, a Marine killed in Iraq, as part of its virulent, anti-gay crusade. Maybe the judgment will be overturned on appeal, maybe the church and its members will manage to hide their assets and avoid paying any damages as other defendants in civil cases have done (see: Simpson, O.J., $33.5 million judgment against). But whether Snyder ever pockets any money, he still wins.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | November 2, 2007
Maybe Albert Snyder will never see a dime of the $10.9 million that a federal jury in Baltimore awarded him against a Kansas church that picketed the funeral of his son, Matt, a Marine killed in Iraq, as part of its virulent, anti-gay crusade. Maybe the judgment will be overturned on appeal, maybe the church and its members will manage to hide their assets and avoid paying any damages as other defendants in civil cases have done (see: Simpson, O.J., $33.5 million judgment against). But whether Snyder ever pockets any money, he still wins.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 6, 2002
TOPEKA, Kan. - City schools Superintendent Robert McFrazier stood on the playground of the modern Williams magnet school and gazed toward Monroe Elementary, a relic from the days of segregation that spurred the filing of the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education lawsuit by 13 black parents here a little more than half a century ago. Inside Williams, built at a cost of $4 million to meet a 1994 federal desegregation order, the classrooms seemingly mirrored...
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 6, 2002
TOPEKA, Kansas - Jack Alexander and Dean Smith played basketball for Topeka High School in 1949, but they played in different gymnasiums against different opponents, and they never went one-on-one against each other. Alexander and Smith were seniors the last year Topeka High had racially segregated basketball teams. Alexander played for the Ramblers, the all-black team, and Smith played for the Trojans, the all-white squad. Smith went on to a 36-year career as coach of the University of North Carolina Tar Heels that included an 879-254 win-loss record, two national championships, 13 Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament championships and 11 Final Four appearances.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 18, 1994
TOPEKA, Kan. -- Linda Brown Thompson's voice betrays weariness when she talks about school desegregation."It's disheartening that we are still fighting," said Mrs. Thompson, 51. "But we are dealing with human beings. As long as we are, there will always be those who feel the races should be separate."She was just 11 when her father, the late Rev. Oliver L. Brown, became the lead plaintiff in Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kan.Today, Mrs. Thompson, her mother, Leola Brown Montgomery, 72, and her youngest sister, Cheryl Brown Henderson, 43, say they realize that desegregation efforts have been glacial at best.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON | May 15, 1994
Washington. -- Four decades after Brown vs. Board of Education, it is a telling fact that two generations of the Brown family -- first Linda, then her children -- have completed their educations in Topeka, Kan., yet the public school system there remains segregated. The original Brown case, in fact, just went through a new trial last month.That has both symbolic and real-world meaning as the nation on Tuesday marks the 40th anniversary of the Supreme Court's historic desegregation ruling in the Topeka case.
NEWS
August 29, 1992
Melvin B. Gayle, who was training for auto body work in the Job Corps in Pittsburgh, drowned near there while swimming in the Allegheny River Aug. 17. He was 22.A Mass of Christian burial for Mr. Gayle will be offered at 10 a.m. today at St. Ambrose Roman Catholic Church, 4205 Park Heights Ave.Born in Kaiserslautern, Germany, while his father was serving in the Army, he lived in Tacoma, Wash., before moving to Baltimore with his family and attending Northwestern High School.His survivors include his parents, Adolph B. and Gwendolyn A. Gayle of Baltimore; a sister, Yolanda B. Newman of Topeka, Kan.; his grandparents, Leo C. Gayle Jr. of Mobile, Ala., and Arlene and the Rev. Gordon Wilson of Topeka.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2010
TOPEKA, Kan. - Topeka's mayor says the city shall temporarily be referred to as "Google, Kansas - the capital city of fiber optics," in an effort to persuade the Internet giant to test an ultra-fast connection in the state capital. Mayor Bill Bunten issued the proclamation Monday after no city council members objected to the monthlong change. Bunten says the proclamation is mainly for fun, but that he hopes it will set Topeka apart from other cities vying for Google's fiber-optics experiment, including Baltimore, Grand Rapids, Mich.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Sun Reporter | March 11, 2006
The family of Lance Cpl. Matthew A. Snyder, who was killed last week in Iraq, desperately wanted to keep his death from being politicized. But a group of protesters had other plans. Waving placards declaring such messages as "Thank God for dead soldiers," seven members of the Westboro Baptist Church from Topeka, Kan., picketed Snyder's service yesterday as they have military funerals across the nation. Assembled on city property adjacent to the St. John Catholic Church in Westminster, the group held signs, some bearing anti-gay slurs, that declared that war casualties are divine retribution - that God is allowing men and women to die in Iraq because of this country's tolerance of homosexuality.
NEWS
January 9, 1991
Services for R. Virgil Parker, a retired layout artist for printing shops and a former resident of Bethesda and Reisterstown, will be held at 9 a.m. today at the Penwell-Gabel Funeral Home in Topeka, Kan.Mr. Parker, who was 78 and lived in Topeka since 1985, died Sunday of heart failure at a hospital there.He was born in Robinson, Kan., attended the University of Kansas and served in the Navy during World War II.Mr. Parker's wife, the former Pauline Smith, died in 1985.He is survived by two sons, David Parker of Silver Spring and Ralph Parker of Topeka; four grandchildren; and a great-grandson.
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