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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 13, 2002
The Saturday revival series at the Charles delivers pop perfection tomorrow with the 1935 smash Top Hat. In the dialogue and situations, the director, Mark Sandrich, and the writers, Dwight Taylor and Allan Scott, deftly milk all manner of farcical misunderstandings. Fred Astaire plays a song-and-dance man headlining a London show, Ginger Rogers a high-society model who mistakes him for his married producer (Edward Everett Horton). Irving Berlin provided the music and lyrics; as usual, the key numbers - "Isn't This a Lovely Day?"
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By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2009
All it took was a brief scan of the crowd at the Walters Art Museum gala to notice there was a little something different at this party. A bright red miter drifted amid a sea of bobbing bare heads. A set of enormous puffed velvet sleeves rubbed shoulders with dozens of traditional tuxedos. A gold lame toga twinkled alongside scores of cocktail dresses and gowns. This was "A Night In The Museum," where guests were encouraged to wear either black-tie attire or a costume inspired by one of the museum's paintings.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 2005
Top Hat Theater Productions, the new theater company launched by Jeffrey Glenn Hitaffer and Jamie Hanna, is in final rehearsals of Jesus Christ Superstar, scheduled to open Aug. 5 at Chesapeake Arts Center's 904-seat Main Theatre in Brooklyn Park. At a rehearsal last week, Hitaffer and co-director Hanna seemed to have everything under control. Absent was the chaos usually encountered at soon-to-open productions. Reflecting on how the company's name was chosen, Hitaffer said, "It's a name to signify the class image that we wish to project by creating excellence in every aspect of theater.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
A 54-year-old businessman, found bound by zip ties inside his Canton vending machine business last month, has died after being taken off life support, and police said Wednesday that homicide detectives are investigating. Constantine "Dino" Frank of Baldwin, who also owned pool halls and shopping centers in Baltimore County, was discovered July 29 in the vestibule of Precision Vending, in the 1000 block of S. Lakewood Ave., face-down and bound. He had managed to get one hand free, but suffered a stroke during the ordeal, according to police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2005
Forming a new theater company in Anne Arundel County might seem somewhat risky considering the number of entrenched companies. Colonial Players, Pasadena Theatre Company, Merely Players, Second Star and Bay Theatre are all vying for the same general audience. But that risk hasn't deterred 32-year-old song-and-dance man Jeffrey Glenn Hitaffer from forming Top Hat Theater Productions, which is in rehearsals at Chesapeake Arts Center with Jesus Christ Superstar, scheduled to open Aug. 5 and run weekends through Aug. 14 at the center's 900-seat main theater.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
A 54-year-old businessman, found bound by zip ties inside his Canton vending machine business last month, has died after being taken off life support, and police said Wednesday that homicide detectives are investigating. Constantine "Dino" Frank of Baldwin, who also owned pool halls and shopping centers in Baltimore County, was discovered July 29 in the vestibule of Precision Vending, in the 1000 block of S. Lakewood Ave., face-down and bound. He had managed to get one hand free, but suffered a stroke during the ordeal, according to police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | October 17, 1999
What's your idea of a "top hat and tails" night out? Is it a visit to a '40s-style martini lounge, complete with a Frank Sinatra impersonator crooning tunes? Maybe a little time spent in a classy casino? Or perhaps Irish fiddlers putting you in fine fettle? You could find all of the above, and then some, at Mercy Medical Center's gala, "Hats Off to Mercy!" at the Hyatt Regency Hotel.Among the 500 in this cosmopolitan crowd were Tom Mullen, president and CEO of Mercy Health Services Inc.; Dr. Lauri Kane and Rosemary Wahler Mullen, event co-chairs; Sister Helen Amos, executive chair of Mercy's board of trustees; Dr. Sheri Rowen, Dr. Bernie Chang and Dr. Neil Rosenshein, directors in the Mercy Center for Women's Health and Medicine; Ron Briggs, WBAL-TV account executive; Michele Emery, director of managed care for Park West Medical Center; Tom Giannopoulos, president and CEO of Micros Systems Inc.; and Jim Chakedis, director of international transportation for Ringling Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 1996
There was a time when almost all pool halls were the same -- seedy, smoky places filled with local riff-raff and juvenile delinquents who were up to no good. No "respectable" person would be found in a billiard parlor. You wouldn't take a date to the local pool hall, and certainly not your children.Ladies and gentlemen would not shoot pool. Only men with colorful nicknames who smoked fat, smelly cigars would shoot pool.Check out the pool halls of the '90s, and you'll see that times have changed.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2009
All it took was a brief scan of the crowd at the Walters Art Museum gala to notice there was a little something different at this party. A bright red miter drifted amid a sea of bobbing bare heads. A set of enormous puffed velvet sleeves rubbed shoulders with dozens of traditional tuxedos. A gold lame toga twinkled alongside scores of cocktail dresses and gowns. This was "A Night In The Museum," where guests were encouraged to wear either black-tie attire or a costume inspired by one of the museum's paintings.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | February 3, 2007
The man in the top hat had spoken, the groundhog song had been sung and the president of the historical society had lectured about the long tradition of rodents predicting the weather. All attention turned to the orange flag that covered a freshly dug hole in the lawn of the Catonsville Historical Society building. The man in the top hat lifted the flag and a furry face with pointy ears, a big black nose and buckteeth peeped over the edge of the hole. The crowd cheered, but not 9-year-old Paige Aldave.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | February 3, 2007
The man in the top hat had spoken, the groundhog song had been sung and the president of the historical society had lectured about the long tradition of rodents predicting the weather. All attention turned to the orange flag that covered a freshly dug hole in the lawn of the Catonsville Historical Society building. The man in the top hat lifted the flag and a furry face with pointy ears, a big black nose and buckteeth peeped over the edge of the hole. The crowd cheered, but not 9-year-old Paige Aldave.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Reporter | September 21, 2006
After remaining virtually unchanged since 1935, Monopoly, the classic board game, has been updated -- and inflated -- for the times, with higher rents, bigger money, new properties and more "contemporary" tokens, five of which carry brand names. National landmarks, all selected in an Internet poll, are bought and sold in the new game, which hit toy stores last week, selling for $30 and up -- about twice the price of the old one, which will still be produced. Gone in the new game are all the old tokens, from the wheelbarrow to the battleship, replaced by, among others, the Toyota Prius and a sack of McDonald's french fries.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 2005
Top Hat Theater Productions - the new company founded by Jeffrey Glenn Hitaffer and Jamie Hanna - is off to a spectacular start with its debut production of Jesus Christ Superstar at Chesapeake Arts Center's 900-seat Main Theater. Hitaffer and Hanna's company goals are to create musical productions filled with great singing, dancing and acting and to feature imaginative staging with precision lighting and sound. They met all of their goals in this contemporary Superstar, which boasts some of the most imaginative staging seen at Chesapeake Arts Center, where it has usually involved placing sets on each side of the stage for predictable and prosaic scene changes.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 2005
Top Hat Theater Productions, the new theater company launched by Jeffrey Glenn Hitaffer and Jamie Hanna, is in final rehearsals of Jesus Christ Superstar, scheduled to open Aug. 5 at Chesapeake Arts Center's 904-seat Main Theatre in Brooklyn Park. At a rehearsal last week, Hitaffer and co-director Hanna seemed to have everything under control. Absent was the chaos usually encountered at soon-to-open productions. Reflecting on how the company's name was chosen, Hitaffer said, "It's a name to signify the class image that we wish to project by creating excellence in every aspect of theater.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2005
Forming a new theater company in Anne Arundel County might seem somewhat risky considering the number of entrenched companies. Colonial Players, Pasadena Theatre Company, Merely Players, Second Star and Bay Theatre are all vying for the same general audience. But that risk hasn't deterred 32-year-old song-and-dance man Jeffrey Glenn Hitaffer from forming Top Hat Theater Productions, which is in rehearsals at Chesapeake Arts Center with Jesus Christ Superstar, scheduled to open Aug. 5 and run weekends through Aug. 14 at the center's 900-seat main theater.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 13, 2002
The Saturday revival series at the Charles delivers pop perfection tomorrow with the 1935 smash Top Hat. In the dialogue and situations, the director, Mark Sandrich, and the writers, Dwight Taylor and Allan Scott, deftly milk all manner of farcical misunderstandings. Fred Astaire plays a song-and-dance man headlining a London show, Ginger Rogers a high-society model who mistakes him for his married producer (Edward Everett Horton). Irving Berlin provided the music and lyrics; as usual, the key numbers - "Isn't This a Lovely Day?"
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Reporter | September 21, 2006
After remaining virtually unchanged since 1935, Monopoly, the classic board game, has been updated -- and inflated -- for the times, with higher rents, bigger money, new properties and more "contemporary" tokens, five of which carry brand names. National landmarks, all selected in an Internet poll, are bought and sold in the new game, which hit toy stores last week, selling for $30 and up -- about twice the price of the old one, which will still be produced. Gone in the new game are all the old tokens, from the wheelbarrow to the battleship, replaced by, among others, the Toyota Prius and a sack of McDonald's french fries.
NEWS
By Kirk S. Nevin | April 23, 1996
I WAS YOUNG and strong, energized by the prospects of my new occupation. I was a chimney sweep!New businesses need smart marketing. An editor at the Aegis in Bel Air agreed to do a feature about me and my new trade.Opportunity! For the interview I had chosen an isolated house in Glenwood, a big two-story colonial with fancy brickwork in the fireplace chimney -- just right for this photo opportunity! The day was perfect . . . new early-May leaves on the big oaks, Greek-blue sky, gusty spring winds.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2002
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - With a horse a Saudi prince bought him to train, Bob Baffert won his third Kentucky Derby yesterday with a fast, nearly black son of Our Emblem named War Emblem. The long-striding long shot loped into the lead, strode effortlessly around the sun-drenched Churchill Downs' oval and then powered down the long stretch, drawing away for a dominant four-length victory. The wire-to-wire performance - the first at the Derby since Winning Colors in 1988 - boldly answered the question of which 3-year-old in this seemingly evenly matched group of 18 could distinguish himself and win this country's most famous race.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2000
HIS NAME is George Cossentino, but some call him the Mad Hatter. To others, he's known as Maestro. But most of the people who know him just call him George. Cossentino, 83, lives at Harmony Hall Retirement Community in the village of Hickory Ridge. Over the past four years, he has collected more than 40 hats, most of them gifts from other residents and visitors to Harmony Hall. Nearly every day, you'll find him wearing one of those hats in the music corner at Harmony Hall. Cossentino is the unofficial disc jockey for the over-60 crowd living there.
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