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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | May 21, 1993
The mighty Wooden Gate Bridge stands in the fifth-grade classroom at Eldersburg Elementary as a monument to engineering and tenacity.Instead of concrete and steel, Wooden Gate Bridge is constructed of toothpicks and glue.The Hammerjack team of four boys built the bridge from stringent job specifications. The boys purchased their materials from the mythical I. Saw Lumber Co. in the classroom.Wooden Gate, about 30 centimeters long and 4 centimeters wide, accommodates a 3.5-centimeter-wide toy truck with room to spare.
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NEWS
February 22, 2006
To properly transport a frosted cake, place mini marshmallows on the tops of toothpicks. Then place the toothpicks on the edges of the cake. Lay plastic wrap over it. "The Best Kitchen Quick Tips," by the editors of Cook's Illustrated Magazine realgoodfood.com This blog offers recipes, tips and musings about food and travel - a good bit of it Italian - from a Portland, Ore., food writer. Rohina Phadnis
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NEWS
February 22, 2006
To properly transport a frosted cake, place mini marshmallows on the tops of toothpicks. Then place the toothpicks on the edges of the cake. Lay plastic wrap over it. "The Best Kitchen Quick Tips," by the editors of Cook's Illustrated Magazine realgoodfood.com This blog offers recipes, tips and musings about food and travel - a good bit of it Italian - from a Portland, Ore., food writer. Rohina Phadnis
FEATURES
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 20, 2000
Surely I'm not the only guest who finds it difficult to eat an hors d'oeuvre as it dangles precariously from a flimsy plastic sword. With a thousand pardons to the host or hostess who dreamed up the notion of entertaining on a toothpick, it's time to trade the spindly little spears for a cup, a glass or a spoon. At a recent museum cocktail party, guests clicked red lacquered chopsticks together while nibbling on a Latin American appetizer known as ceviche. The chilled, marinated seafood cocktail was served in an elegant martini glass.
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | July 28, 1993
A trip to your local farmers' market provides more than lunch. When it's too hot to play outside, let the kids practice a different kind of culinary art, turning produce into a menagerie of fanciful creatures.These animals are made entirely from fruits, vegetables and other edibles, with a few toothpicks thrown in for structural support.Your kids can copy these designs or come up with their own. The possibilities are as endless as their imaginations and the offerings of your local produce bin.Set up a work place in the kitchen, gather the supplies and get creative.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
Groups of sixth-graders at Linthicum Elementary School pushed and pulled toothpicks and marshmallows yesterday, trying to build a bridge that would support a box of pennies and resist the urge to eat the marshmallows at the same time.They were among students throughout the county getting a glimpse of life as an engineer as part of Discover E program, started in 1990 by the National Society of Professional Engineers to encourage students to pursue careers in engineering.Engineers from Westinghouse have visited six schools in Anne Arundel County this year, showing students videos, conducting hands-on experiments and explaining their jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1996
The American Visionary Art Museum's first major exhibit, "Tree of Life," will be closing Sept. 2. That means you have just a week and a half to catch this whimsical, woodsy wave of "outsider" artists.The acclaimed show consists of works of art that use wood and trees as inspiration. See items ranging from a model of the ship Lusitania made from 193,000 toothpicks to art fashioned from apple crates.The museum will close after Sept. 2 (except for its Joy America Cafe) and then reopen for its next exhibit, "Wind in My Hair," on Oct. 12. "Wind" will celebrate icons of air and speed.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 13, 1991
What do the readers want? This is a question all of us in newspaper journalism regularly ask ourselves.Do readers want to be entertained? Do they want to be informed? Do they want big color pictures? Do they clamor for itty-bitty bites of data? My answer is: It depends.Mainly it depends what you didn't give them. Whatever you have left out in your tome on toothpicks -- data on the number of toothpicks in a box, funny true-to-life toothpick stories or a provocative analysis of the meaning of toothpicks in American society -- that is what readers want.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1999
They ran blindly, clawing at locked windows, huddling breathlessly in corners, racing upstairs like horror movie heroines fleeing a psycho killer.They ran from Vince the Cowboy Stripper.The guests at this gathering were free to run.Kristen Mrozinski, the bride-to-be, was not. She was trapped for the performance.From beneath her mom-made, white bridal baseball cap, adorned with silk bows, flowers and a ponytail veil, her eyes pleaded "HELP ME!" Her face resembled a cherry tomato.The bachelorette party -- that traditional sayonara to the single life -- was getting into the groove.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | October 29, 1994
Horace A. Palmer, a retired electrical contractor, died Wednesday of cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Monkton resident was 62.He retired this year from Palmer Electric, which he founded in 1967, for health reasons.For years, Mr. Palmer ate breakfast and lunch almost daily at the Wagon Wheel on York Road, the only restaurant in Hereford, which named a sandwich after him.Betty Winner, owner of the restaurant, said, "If he was within 10 miles of this place, he'd come for breakfast and lunch, and always sat at what we call the 'B.S.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1999
They ran blindly, clawing at locked windows, huddling breathlessly in corners, racing upstairs like horror movie heroines fleeing a psycho killer.They ran from Vince the Cowboy Stripper.The guests at this gathering were free to run.Kristen Mrozinski, the bride-to-be, was not. She was trapped for the performance.From beneath her mom-made, white bridal baseball cap, adorned with silk bows, flowers and a ponytail veil, her eyes pleaded "HELP ME!" Her face resembled a cherry tomato.The bachelorette party -- that traditional sayonara to the single life -- was getting into the groove.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1998
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- The track was made of boards, five million feet of Georgia pine, and the late Bill France loved to try to race his daddy's Model-T on its high banks on the weekend when he was a teen-ager.The track in Laurel, Md., that became known as "the toothpick palace" had a great impact on the man who would create the National Association of Stock Car Racing (NASCAR) and build the super, high-banked Daytona International Speedway.Today, NASCAR is celebrating its 50th anniversary season, and the speedway is playing host to the 40th Daytona 500.A mechanic at heart, France packed up his family, wife Annie and son Bill Jr., in 1934 during the Great Depression and headed for Florida.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1997
Lance Hamilton of Delta, Pa., wrote that he remembers growing up in Baltimore and "having cinnamon toothpicks made."He added: "I'd like to make my own and any help you can give me will be greatly appreciated. I believe they were made with the flat-style toothpick."H. A. Weber of Bel Air and Anita T. Strickhausen of Fayetteville, N.C., both have fond memories of cinnamon toothpicks and both sent in suggestions for making them that chef Kent Rigby favored.Weber wrote: "When I was young, many, many moons ago, all we did was buy a small vial of pure cinnamon oil from the druggist and soak the small ends of the toothpicks in it for an hour or so. You don't need much.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 30, 1997
With "The End Is Near!" the American Visionary Art Museum makes a new and most welcome beginning.AVAM, now 18 months old, is the only major American museum dedicated to visionary art, defined as the product of self-taught artists working outside the mainstream and driven to create by a compulsive inner vision. AVAM's third major show, and much its best to date, opens to the public tomorrow."The End Is Near!" -- occasioned by the approach of the millennium and devoted to visions both optimistic and pessimistic -- is the most focused and aesthetically consistent .. show AVAM has yet produced.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1996
The American Visionary Art Museum's first major exhibit, "Tree of Life," will be closing Sept. 2. That means you have just a week and a half to catch this whimsical, woodsy wave of "outsider" artists.The acclaimed show consists of works of art that use wood and trees as inspiration. See items ranging from a model of the ship Lusitania made from 193,000 toothpicks to art fashioned from apple crates.The museum will close after Sept. 2 (except for its Joy America Cafe) and then reopen for its next exhibit, "Wind in My Hair," on Oct. 12. "Wind" will celebrate icons of air and speed.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1995
In a cultured moment, the Lizard Man of Lee County met a Development Director of Baltimore County. It happened at Friday's opening of the American Visionary Art Museum at Baltimore's Inner Harbor. It happened because it was meant to be:Courtney McKeldin: "Isn't he amazing?"Lizard Man: Says nothing, remains nailed to museum wall, flashing his wood-carved tongue and showing off his green toe-nails.Ms. McKeldin: "He's got a nice smile on his face -- for a lizard man."Lizard Man: Again says nothing, but what is he thinking?
FEATURES
By Rosemary Knower | September 23, 1990
Anyone who has ever been lucky enough to live in Paris can tell you that the city is at its best in autumn. The melancholy downward spiral of the chestnut leaves, the level September light, laid like good butter over the long shadows in the Bois de Boulogne, and skies so blazingly blue that it is not difficult to know what the craftsmen of Notre Dame were thinking of when they made the stained glass for the great rose window.A perfect time, whether you are in Paris or not, for one of those October picnics that lingers as the final remembrance of summer.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1997
Lance Hamilton of Delta, Pa., wrote that he remembers growing up in Baltimore and "having cinnamon toothpicks made."He added: "I'd like to make my own and any help you can give me will be greatly appreciated. I believe they were made with the flat-style toothpick."H. A. Weber of Bel Air and Anita T. Strickhausen of Fayetteville, N.C., both have fond memories of cinnamon toothpicks and both sent in suggestions for making them that chef Kent Rigby favored.Weber wrote: "When I was young, many, many moons ago, all we did was buy a small vial of pure cinnamon oil from the druggist and soak the small ends of the toothpicks in it for an hour or so. You don't need much.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
Groups of sixth-graders at Linthicum Elementary School pushed and pulled toothpicks and marshmallows yesterday, trying to build a bridge that would support a box of pennies and resist the urge to eat the marshmallows at the same time.They were among students throughout the county getting a glimpse of life as an engineer as part of Discover E program, started in 1990 by the National Society of Professional Engineers to encourage students to pursue careers in engineering.Engineers from Westinghouse have visited six schools in Anne Arundel County this year, showing students videos, conducting hands-on experiments and explaining their jobs.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | December 18, 1994
Q: Can you help me decide the value of a red glass toothpick holder that was my grandmother's? It has the words "World's Fair 1893" on it and is decorated with flowers and leaves.A: The 1893 World's Fair Columbian Exposition was held in Chicago. Souvenirs similar to yours would probably be worth about $35 to $45.Q: I have a beautiful porcelain tea set, in mint condition, consisting of six cups and saucers, teapot, sugar and creamer. Each piece is decorated with hand-painted flowers and leaves and the cups are footed.
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