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NEWS
March 12, 2010
- Twitter can now let the world automatically know your whereabouts as well as your thoughts and activities. A new feature unveiled Thursday gives Twitter users the option of including their location with the assorted musings posted on the Internet messaging service. Locations won't be included unless users turn on the tracking tool. The technology, which shadows people through Web browsers, can be turned off at any time. Twitter is responding to other Internet services, such as Foursquare and Loopt, that broadcast people's locations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The state attorney general's office is appealing a federal judge's ruling ordering Maryland to use an absentee ballot-marking technology for the disabled that the Board of Elections had refused to certify as secure. The state will ask the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., to throw out District Judge Richard D. Bennett's decision this month. Bennett found that the election board's refusal to implement the program violated the federal Americans with Disabilities Act. The attorney general's office filed a notice of intent to appeal Monday but did not spell out its objections to the ruling.
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NEWS
September 20, 2013
Retired Baltimore City Police major Robert L. DiStefano did a disservice to the department in his letter to the editor debunking the idea of cops wearing small video cameras on their uniforms or glasses ( "Cameras could be costly for police," Sept. 17). It was encouraging to read that Baltimore City was thinking about using video cameras for their police as part of their crime investigation scheme. To see an action recorded in real time is intelligent science. Mr. DiStefano instead jumped into the ring with the "Big Brother" gloves on. To attempt to protect morale is commendable but not necessary.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
A federal judge in Baltimore ordered Maryland elections officials to adopt an online absentee voting tool in time for this year's general election, despite warnings from computer security experts that the system could lead to voter fraud. The ruling was sought by a group of disabled voters and the National Federation of the Blind, who say the tool will make it easier for people with disabilities to cast ballots without relying on another person. "The court today has protected the fundamental rights of voters with disabilities, including the rights to equal access and to a secret ballot," said Mark Riccobono, president of the federation.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
Stanley Black & Decker announced Thursday that it had acquired CRC-Evans International, a supplier of specialized tools, equipment and services for the construction of oil and natural gas transmission pipelines, in a $445 million cash deal. The Connecticut-based company bought CRC from a group of investors led by private equity firm Natural Gas Partners. Houston-based CRC, with fiscal revenue of about $250 million, will allow Stanley to immediately capitalize on favorable trends in the oil and gas infrastructure arena, Stanley said in a statement.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Tim Wheeler 's article, "Senators seek to stall pollution regulations" (March 10) misses one critical point: The proposed delays are being driven by re-election priorities, not environmental responsibilities. For decades, scientists and policy makers have been aware that manure runoff is a major cause of pollution to the Chesapeake Bay. Or to be more explicit, this is about how to deal with excessive amounts of chicken poop. The O'Malley administration created the phosphorus management tool as a way to reduce manure application in places where the soil is already saturated.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
A federal judge in Baltimore ordered Maryland elections officials to adopt an online absentee voting tool in time for this year's general election, despite warnings from computer security experts that the system could lead to voter fraud. The ruling was sought by a group of disabled voters and the National Federation of the Blind, who say the tool will make it easier for people with disabilities to cast ballots without relying on another person. "The court today has protected the fundamental rights of voters with disabilities, including the rights to equal access and to a secret ballot," said Mark Riccobono, president of the federation.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
A tool that contains a small amount of radioactive material, used to measure concentrations of lead in paint, was stolen in Baltimore Monday afternoon, the Maryland Department of the Environment said in an alert. The department said the tool, a Dynasil RMD LPA-1 analyzer, stolen after a property inspection in the 2600 block of E. Monument St., poses "no imminent public health risk. " The radioactive material inside the three-pound device is sealed and housed in a tungsten shield, with locks to prevent its shutter from being opened, the department said.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1998
Anthony "Tony" Baikauskas, a retired Martin Marietta Corp. tool and pattern maker who designed parts for the Gemini 2 spacecraft and found a unique way to experience the world after two paralyzing strokes, died Thursday of congestive heart failure and pneumonia at Fallston General Hospital. He was 91.At Martin Marietta, where he worked from 1942 until his retirement as a tool and pattern supervisor in 1972, Mr. Baikauskas designed aircraft parts that had to be accurate to the millimeter. He received many certificates of excellence for his superior work.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | October 8, 2006
The folks at Wenger, maker of Swiss Army stuff, call their newest little gizmo a personal manicure tool. Shows you what they know. Any angler - especially a fly guy or gal - will take one look at this fancy nail clipper and say, "What a neat fishing tool to clip to my vest." The Clipper comes two ways: one with a tiny knife blade and the other with a screwdriver, which makes it OK for air travel. The other tools are a clipper (good for nails or fishing line), a pair of scissors, a nail file (I've removed hook barbs with it)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
William Smith's disease has grim milestones. At 2, the Gambrills triplet known as Mick couldn't walk or talk as well as his siblings. In kindergarten, he started losing language and motor skills. At 12, he needed a wheelchair and a feeding tube. Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital dedicated to treating his symptoms said he had an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. But a new test may provide something the family has long sought: a name. "The idea that there is something out there that can tell you [what's wrong]
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Big Brother is watching you — through your smart meter? One complaint about the technology, as electric and gas utilities roll it out here and across the country, is that it offers another way for government agencies — or hackers — to snoop on us. The American Civil Liberties Union notes that at least some utilities have turned over customer data after legal demands. San Diego Gas & Electric, required by California regulators to report annually on privacy issues, said it disclosed 3,056 customers' records last year, some of which could have included "energy usage data of varying granularities.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
More people in Baltimore than any city in the country search Google for information on getting criminal records expunged, but activists found the the results offering advice on how to wipe clean old arrests pretty unhelpful. So, they decided to launch their own app to walk people through the process in the hopes that simplifying how expungement works could help people with arrest records get jobs. A beta version of the app, Expunge Maryland,  went live this week . Users of the app can either pull their records from the judiciary's case search system, or follow instructions on how to get their complete rap sheet from the state.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman | June 17, 2014
Howard County's Office of Consumer Affairs unveiled an online tool for residents to learn about scams. A new webpage, Scam Alert, includes a list of recent scams, tips for identifying scams, and a tool for reporting scams to county officials. The site is howardcountymd.gov/scamalert.htm. Officials said county residents have been the victims of several scams this year, including one in which a caller claims to be from Microsoft and asks for access to residents' computers to conduct a security scan.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Before the start of the next school year, Baltimore City youths will need to abide by a new curfew that calls for them to be off the street as early as 9 p.m. under legislation the City Council approved Monday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who pledged to sign the bill into law, said the measure will keep the city's children and teens safe and identify families in need of intervention. The law won't take effect until about mid-August, a delay that's expected to give the administration time to open a year-round curfew center.
NEWS
April 10, 2014
This week, America learned what the folks over on Security Boulevard already knew — there's a lot to be learned from Medicare accounting. Medicare paid out $77 billion to health care providers in 2012, according to the long-awaited data coming from the Baltimore-based Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, but some providers received a lot more than others. Not surprisingly, this small exercise in transparency was blasted by some of the high earners who fret that the information can be misleading and unfair.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer | April 19, 1994
Working as a librarian has taught former blacksmith and Vietnam veteran Walter Rave that the public often acts like a spoiled brat and that real librarians are servants possessed of virtue and valor.In a field that typically demands a master's degree, Mr. Rave has never taken a course in library science. And, though the public library he runs in Takoma Park has more than a few books, it really exists to lend tools -- belt sanders, drain snakes, lawn mowers, electric drills and long-handled spades.
NEWS
November 19, 1993
A 23-year-old man and 20-year-old woman have been charged with theft and burglary in connection with a burglaries of at least 70 backyard tool sheds in the Pasadena area between June and this month, county police said.Roland Edwin Cross, of the first block of Nicholson Drive, Pasadena, was charged with 14 counts of theft and burglary. His girlfriend, Heather Lea Bussick, of the 8400 block of Forest Drive, Pasadena, was charged with theft and burglary.Police said they learned from pawn shops in Anne Arundel and Howard counties and Baltimore that Ms. Bussick, accompanied by Mr. Cross, had been selling items reported stolen from the sheds.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
The educators at Marley Elementary School near Glen Burnie are a little worried about what may happen when their students receive the next generation of tests. These new assessments have been billed as more challenging, but a room of fourth-graders practicing the test on computers Thursday morning seemed unfazed. "The questions were more simple," said Elena Waller, 9, who will be one of the 65,000 students across the state to take a field test of the new PARCC assessments next week.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Tim Wheeler 's article, "Senators seek to stall pollution regulations" (March 10) misses one critical point: The proposed delays are being driven by re-election priorities, not environmental responsibilities. For decades, scientists and policy makers have been aware that manure runoff is a major cause of pollution to the Chesapeake Bay. Or to be more explicit, this is about how to deal with excessive amounts of chicken poop. The O'Malley administration created the phosphorus management tool as a way to reduce manure application in places where the soil is already saturated.
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