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NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 22, 1999
If we would just loosen the residency requirement a little, Tony Williams could be mayor of both Deecee and Bawlamer at the same time.Using the surplus to pay off the debt is so obvious Congress will never do it.Investing Social Security funds in the stock market is a neat idea as long as the market goes up.First ballroom dancing. Now bribery is an Olympic sport.Pub Date: 1/22/99
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NEWS
October 17, 2011
This weekend, NBC will devote four hours of coverage to the World Gymnastics Championships in Tokyo, yet The Sun couldn't manage four lines in the sports section to highlight a Baltimore-area athlete who competed at this precursor to the Olympic. You won't see Toni-Ann Williams on television, as she peeled off the bars in her second rotation and couldn't finish the routine because she literally ripped her palm off. But undaunted and bandaged, she went on to wow the arena by sticking her double front off beam and performing world class tumbling on the floor exercise.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 14, 1994
ACID EATERSRamones (Radioactive 10913) It's easy enough to appreciate the concept behind the Ramones' "Acid Eaters" -- a dozen psychedelic oldies revved up and remade by America's most enduring punk band. Too bad the execution tends more to bad trips than transcendental experiences. Funny as it is to hear the band rip through a breakneck "My Back Pages" or hot-rod "Somebody to Love" with Traci Lords on harmony, the band's remake of "Journey to the Center of the Earth" pales in comparison to the original, while Pete Townshend's harmony vocals on "Substitute" only underscore how weak Joey Ramone's lead is. Turn off, tune out, drop this.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2010
Maryland's highest court threw out Wednesday the murder conviction of a man accused of shooting his fiancee in the head more than a dozen years ago, the second time appellate judges have vacated a guilty verdict in the case, citing errors by prosecutors and the judge. At Tony Williams' first trial in 1999, the state's attorney's office failed to disclose that a witness to whom the suspect confessed was a police informant, and the Court of Appeals ordered a new trial. At the suspect's second trial in 2007, the appeals court has now ruled that the judge mistakenly allowed videotaped testimony from another witness who died before the second trial, after a detective disclosed that the woman was legally blind and might not have been able to see the shooting, as she had claimed in court.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 22, 1998
When Samantha "Sam" Porter walked down the aisle on her wedding day, she was escorted by the most important person in her life: her 9-year-old son, Brandon.Brandon now shares top billing in his mother's heart with her new husband, David Williams. But that suits both of her "men" just fine, Sam says. In fact, Brandon and David get along so well that sometimes, Sam says with a laugh, she feels outnumbered.Sam, an anesthesia specialist who grew up in South Baltimore, took a circuitous route to the altar.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2010
Maryland's highest court threw out Wednesday the murder conviction of a man accused of shooting his fiancee in the head more than a dozen years ago, the second time appellate judges have vacated a guilty verdict in the case, citing errors by prosecutors and the judge. At Tony Williams' first trial in 1999, the state's attorney's office failed to disclose that a witness to whom the suspect confessed was a police informant, and the Court of Appeals ordered a new trial. At the suspect's second trial in 2007, the appeals court has now ruled that the judge mistakenly allowed videotaped testimony from another witness who died before the second trial, after a detective disclosed that the woman was legally blind and might not have been able to see the shooting, as she had claimed in court.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2004
What goes around almost always comes around in the NFL. That's to say, the Denver Broncos, the league's foremost practitioners of the cut block, better keep their eyes wide open when they tackle the Atlanta Falcons today. There likely will be more infighting than usual when these two division leaders meet. Alex Gibbs, the man who made the cut block a nasty phrase in Denver, has taken the blocking technique to Atlanta, where the Falcons are learning to run the ball like the Broncos. When Gibbs was their line coach, the Broncos cultivated a reputation for a relentless running game and, less flattering, for employing the cut and chop blocks.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 11, 2000
When the Miles Davis box set "Quintet 1965-1968" was released in 1998, critics referred to that group -- Davis on trumpet, saxophonist Wayne Shorter, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Tony Williams -- as the second great Davis Quintet. The first, as the scribes pointed out, was the band Davis formed in late 1955, featuring tenor saxophonist John Coltrane, pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones. That was the group that defined the sound of late '50s hard bop, thanks to such classic recordings as "Milestones," "On Green Dolphin Street" and the immortal "Round Midnight."
NEWS
October 17, 2011
This weekend, NBC will devote four hours of coverage to the World Gymnastics Championships in Tokyo, yet The Sun couldn't manage four lines in the sports section to highlight a Baltimore-area athlete who competed at this precursor to the Olympic. You won't see Toni-Ann Williams on television, as she peeled off the bars in her second rotation and couldn't finish the routine because she literally ripped her palm off. But undaunted and bandaged, she went on to wow the arena by sticking her double front off beam and performing world class tumbling on the floor exercise.
NEWS
August 17, 1992
Tony Williams, 64, the original lead singer of The Platters whose renditions of "Only You" and "The Great Pretender" propelled the rhythm and blues group to stardom in the 1950s, died Friday in his Manhattan apartment. He had diabetes and emphysema. Born in Elizabeth, N.J., he was a parking lot attendant in Los Angeles in 1953 when he was recruited by songwriter Buck Ram to front the new group. Before Mr. Williams left the group in 1960, The Platters had four No. 1 hits and 16 gold records.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2004
What goes around almost always comes around in the NFL. That's to say, the Denver Broncos, the league's foremost practitioners of the cut block, better keep their eyes wide open when they tackle the Atlanta Falcons today. There likely will be more infighting than usual when these two division leaders meet. Alex Gibbs, the man who made the cut block a nasty phrase in Denver, has taken the blocking technique to Atlanta, where the Falcons are learning to run the ball like the Broncos. When Gibbs was their line coach, the Broncos cultivated a reputation for a relentless running game and, less flattering, for employing the cut and chop blocks.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 11, 2000
When the Miles Davis box set "Quintet 1965-1968" was released in 1998, critics referred to that group -- Davis on trumpet, saxophonist Wayne Shorter, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Tony Williams -- as the second great Davis Quintet. The first, as the scribes pointed out, was the band Davis formed in late 1955, featuring tenor saxophonist John Coltrane, pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones. That was the group that defined the sound of late '50s hard bop, thanks to such classic recordings as "Milestones," "On Green Dolphin Street" and the immortal "Round Midnight."
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 22, 1999
If we would just loosen the residency requirement a little, Tony Williams could be mayor of both Deecee and Bawlamer at the same time.Using the surplus to pay off the debt is so obvious Congress will never do it.Investing Social Security funds in the stock market is a neat idea as long as the market goes up.First ballroom dancing. Now bribery is an Olympic sport.Pub Date: 1/22/99
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 22, 1998
When Samantha "Sam" Porter walked down the aisle on her wedding day, she was escorted by the most important person in her life: her 9-year-old son, Brandon.Brandon now shares top billing in his mother's heart with her new husband, David Williams. But that suits both of her "men" just fine, Sam says. In fact, Brandon and David get along so well that sometimes, Sam says with a laugh, she feels outnumbered.Sam, an anesthesia specialist who grew up in South Baltimore, took a circuitous route to the altar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 14, 1994
ACID EATERSRamones (Radioactive 10913) It's easy enough to appreciate the concept behind the Ramones' "Acid Eaters" -- a dozen psychedelic oldies revved up and remade by America's most enduring punk band. Too bad the execution tends more to bad trips than transcendental experiences. Funny as it is to hear the band rip through a breakneck "My Back Pages" or hot-rod "Somebody to Love" with Traci Lords on harmony, the band's remake of "Journey to the Center of the Earth" pales in comparison to the original, while Pete Townshend's harmony vocals on "Substitute" only underscore how weak Joey Ramone's lead is. Turn off, tune out, drop this.
SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN | September 19, 2000
Did Australia deport all of its grumpy people for the Olympics, or does the climate and geography simply make everyone cheery? From the hotel chambermaid to the honcho who handles media access at the International Aquatic Centre, everyone in Sydney is accommodating and good-natured. Need transport? No worries. Need a sandwich at 2:30 a.m.? Coming up. There are 60,000 volunteers working the Games, and their demeanor makes the employees at Disney World seem more like Scrooge McDuck. "I suppose people who volunteer tend to be people who are into people," said one, who did not look like Barbra Streisand.
SPORTS
October 9, 2000
Tampa Bay (3-2) at Minnesota (4-0) Time: 9 p.m., chs. 2, 7. Line: Vikings by 1 Vs. spread: Bucs 3-2; Vikings 3-1. Series: Vikings lead 29-15 Last meeting: Bucs won, 24-17, on Dec. 6, 1999, at Tampa Bay. Outlook: These teams have split their series in each of the past seven years and the home team has won 10 of the past 14. The game in part will be decided by big passing plays. Minnesota has a deep-strike vertical attack; Tampa Bay does not. Randy Moss has reached 3,000 receiving yards faster than any player (36 games)
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