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NEWS
June 10, 2007
Tony Soprano, who for eight long years has balanced his vocation as a New Jersey mob boss with a suburban lifestyle, made that absurd self-assessment recently to his psychiatrist, Dr. Melfi. Now, the doctor has dumped him and Tony, played by actor James Gandolfini on the HBO series, is on the run. One way or the other, it will all end tonight. ?I'm a good guy, basically. I love my family. There's a balance, there's a ying and a yang.? Tony Soprano
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
James Gandolfini, whose remarkable performance as mob boss Tony Soprano in HBO's "The Sopranos" re-imagined the anti-hero for American television, is dead at 51 years of age. The actor, who is believed to have died of a heart attack, was traveling in Italy at the time of his death Wednesday. HBO confirmed his death. "We're all in shock and feeling immeasurable sadness at the loss of a beloved member of our family," an HBO statement said. "He was special man, a great talent, but more importantly a gentle and loving person who treated everyone no matter their title or position with equal respect.
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NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 12, 2006
It's late at night, and a worried-looking, middle-aged businessman is standing alone at the edge of his suburban, backyard swimming pool lost in thought. It has been a day of mounting business debts, as well as threats on his life from a menacing rival. And now, as an anxious wife waits upstairs, he holds a little, blue Viagra pill in the palm of his hand. No, it's not Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), of The Sopranos. It's Bill Henrickson (Bill Paxton), of Big Love, an intriguing new series about a Utah polygamist with three wives and three families all living in the same cul-de-sac.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 10, 2009
U2's Bono to write column for The New York Times Bono - lead singer for U2 and an advocate in the fight against poverty in Africa and AIDS - will write an Op-Ed column for The New York Times. The paper announced that his first column will appear tomorrow, for which he will also do a podcast. His column will appear occasionally. Bono, 48, called the gig "an honor," and joked that he's "never been great with the full stops or commas." The Times said the column will cover a broad range of topics.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 26, 2007
One of the most unforgettable moments in the past decade of TV crime drama was the dismemberment by gangster Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) of Ralph Cifaretto (Joe Pantoliano), one of his mob soldiers, in season four of HBO's The Sopranos. (Remember the bowling ball bag Tony used to carry Cifaretto's head?) Well, there is a sequence every bit as intense, gruesome and darkly comic in the highly anticipated NBC series The Black Donnellys, from Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco, the Academy Award-winning writers of the film Crash.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 26, 2003
Mobsters and Gangsters: Organized Crime in America from Al Capone to Tony Soprano, edited by Life Magazine, 128 pages, $19.95. The remnants of the legendary Life magazine are now an occasional book publishing imprint, and its latest production is this gallivant through its title subject. The pictures are the heart of it, of course, and they are splendid, if you like the looks of gangsters, dead or alive. Among the earliest are the Daltons, all four of them shot down in 1892, as the gang "poses posthumously."
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | May 13, 2001
The new face of men's fashion, some say, is soft, pudgy and just a tad lumpen. The eyes are beady, the lips are menacingly curled, the hairline has long crept past the halfway mark of the head. And the belly is recognizable for its unabashedly comfortable droop over the belt. Sure, these are highly unusual elements of a male icon in the fashion world, where those anointed for deification tend to possess the dimensions of an Adonis. But when you're Tony Soprano, a likable mob boss on one of the most popular shows on television -- well, the rules of fashion can be altered.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Boston Globe | May 13, 2001
NEW YORK -- Oprah Winfrey's Book Club has some competition. The unlikely source: Tony Soprano. On the April 15 episode of "The Sopranos," the HBO hit show about a Mafia family, Tony said he had been reading Sun-tzu's "The Art of War," and finding it useful. He repeated the author's name April 22. Almost instantly, the book -- a 2,500-year-old treatise on military strategy by a semi-mythical Chinese warrior -- started selling like gangbusters. Oxford University Press, which has been publishing the book since 1963, normally sells a few hundred copies a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 7, 2004
On the eve of the fifth season of The Sopranos, David Chase, its creator and executive producer, offered a few thoughts on the show's meaning, his future, and the horror of network television. How is The Sopranos different from the rest of television? The function of an hour drama is to reassure the American people that it's OK to go out and buy stuff. It's all about flattering the audience, making them feel as if all the authority figures have our best interests at heart. Doctors, lawyers, psychiatrists: Sure, they have their little foibles, some of them are grouchy, but by God, they care.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 6, 2006
OK, anyone who remembers anything about the last episode of The Sopranos raise your hand. Me, I dimly remember two things. I remember Tony Soprano whacking his cousin, Tony B., as he returned home from grocery shopping and thinking: "Uh-oh, someone picked up the wrong kind of prosciutto." And I remember the feds raiding mobster Johnny Sack's house and a terrified Tony fleeing through the woods like he'd just spotted a Dick Cheney hunting party. But after that it's all kind of hazy. And no wonder.
NEWS
June 10, 2007
Tony Soprano, who for eight long years has balanced his vocation as a New Jersey mob boss with a suburban lifestyle, made that absurd self-assessment recently to his psychiatrist, Dr. Melfi. Now, the doctor has dumped him and Tony, played by actor James Gandolfini on the HBO series, is on the run. One way or the other, it will all end tonight. ?I'm a good guy, basically. I love my family. There's a balance, there's a ying and a yang.? Tony Soprano
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,Sun Reporter | May 17, 2007
If the dog is truly man's best friend, then where does that leave the horse? Without the horse, after all, it's hard to imagine what this country would look like, and that's not even taking into account the often-overlooked comedic brilliance of the talking-horse flick Hot to Trot, starring - using the most liberal definition of the word star - Bobcat Gold- thwait. Horses have, quite literally, done some of the heaviest lifting in this country's history, from pulling Conestoga wagons across the prairie to delivering our mail via the Pony Express.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | April 9, 2007
If you watched the return of The Sopranos on HBO last night, you know the notorious New Jersey crime family has sunk to a new low. Forget the whackings and beatings and witness intimidation. Forget the drug dealing, loan sharking and extortion. No, this is truly unforgivable. Now they're into karaoke. OK, was that painful to watch or what? Carmela with a snootful of wine swaying in front of the teleprompter and screeching the lyrics to "Love Hurts"? Look, if we have to put up with any more of that in the next eight episodes, it's going to be a long, long season.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | March 22, 2007
Please excuse me for thinkin' and talkin' this way - droppin' my g's and all - but whenever I read juicy [expletive] transcripts from [expletive] FBI wiretaps, life sounds like one big Sopranos script, if you know what I mean. Not that Tommy "Big Mouth" Bromwell, the former big-shot Baltimore County state senator, is like Tony Soprano. I would never [expletive] say that. (And besides, Tony Soprano would never drink Crown Royal on the rocks with a splash of cherry juice, like the FBI accuses Tommy of doing in one of the transcripts.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 26, 2007
One of the most unforgettable moments in the past decade of TV crime drama was the dismemberment by gangster Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) of Ralph Cifaretto (Joe Pantoliano), one of his mob soldiers, in season four of HBO's The Sopranos. (Remember the bowling ball bag Tony used to carry Cifaretto's head?) Well, there is a sequence every bit as intense, gruesome and darkly comic in the highly anticipated NBC series The Black Donnellys, from Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco, the Academy Award-winning writers of the film Crash.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 12, 2006
It's late at night, and a worried-looking, middle-aged businessman is standing alone at the edge of his suburban, backyard swimming pool lost in thought. It has been a day of mounting business debts, as well as threats on his life from a menacing rival. And now, as an anxious wife waits upstairs, he holds a little, blue Viagra pill in the palm of his hand. No, it's not Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), of The Sopranos. It's Bill Henrickson (Bill Paxton), of Big Love, an intriguing new series about a Utah polygamist with three wives and three families all living in the same cul-de-sac.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | September 12, 2002
LIKE MILLIONS of Americans, I'm pumped for the new season. Who wouldn't be? The scouting report promises another year of murder and betrayal, of greed and retribution, of lust and larceny, and of course all this makes me warm and tingly inside. That's right, The Sopranos, HBO's mega-hit series about the Jersey wise-guy life, returns Sunday after a 16-month hiatus, and if that isn't a reason to grab the remote and tear open the Doritos, I don't know what is. There's a school of thought that says what makes The Sopranos so compelling is that it deals with the ups and downs of ordinary life, portraying Tony Soprano as a sort of suburban Everyman, minus the Craftsman riding mower.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 16, 2005
Doing audio commentary requires a real knack, and more often than not directors, writers, producers and even actors seem at a loss for words when they are called upon to discuss the film or TV series in question. But that certainly isn't the case with the commentaries on The Sopranos - The Complete Fifth Season (HBO, $100). The three-disc set features four superlative and diverse commentaries from the directors of the Emmy Award-winning mob series and a fifth with actress Drea de Matteo, who talks about the episode in which her character, Adriana, meets her maker.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 6, 2006
OK, anyone who remembers anything about the last episode of The Sopranos raise your hand. Me, I dimly remember two things. I remember Tony Soprano whacking his cousin, Tony B., as he returned home from grocery shopping and thinking: "Uh-oh, someone picked up the wrong kind of prosciutto." And I remember the feds raiding mobster Johnny Sack's house and a terrified Tony fleeing through the woods like he'd just spotted a Dick Cheney hunting party. But after that it's all kind of hazy. And no wonder.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 16, 2005
Doing audio commentary requires a real knack, and more often than not directors, writers, producers and even actors seem at a loss for words when they are called upon to discuss the film or TV series in question. But that certainly isn't the case with the commentaries on The Sopranos - The Complete Fifth Season (HBO, $100). The three-disc set features four superlative and diverse commentaries from the directors of the Emmy Award-winning mob series and a fifth with actress Drea de Matteo, who talks about the episode in which her character, Adriana, meets her maker.
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