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By CLARENCE PAGE | September 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Usually when big-shot Washington figures say they're abruptly leaving their job to spend more time with their families, you have good reason to roll your eyes and say, "Yeah. Right." But no eyes rolled in the roomful of reporters when White House Press Secretary Tony Snow said it on his last day on the job. It was the morning after the president's televised speech to announce the first "drawdown" of American forces in Iraq. Mr. Snow met with reporters in a newsmaker breakfast held by The Christian Science Monitor.
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NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | September 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Usually when big-shot Washington figures say they're abruptly leaving their job to spend more time with their families, you have good reason to roll your eyes and say, "Yeah. Right." But no eyes rolled in the roomful of reporters when White House Press Secretary Tony Snow said it on his last day on the job. It was the morning after the president's televised speech to announce the first "drawdown" of American forces in Iraq. Mr. Snow met with reporters in a newsmaker breakfast held by The Christian Science Monitor.
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FEATURES
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | July 25, 2006
WASHINGTON-- --Back when Tony Snow was free to speak his mind, he lambasted the news media and President Bush with almost gleeful abandon. Journalists were elitists who "tend to look on the American public with finicky disdain," Snow wrote in a 2004 Web column. Network news thrived on "snob appeal." Reporters "almost never admit an error," and their use of unnamed sources was "slimy" - a way to "make sloppy reporting easier to commit and harder to detect," he wrote last year. As for Bush, he was "something of an embarrassment," a leader afflicted by the "wimp factor," wrote the man who would soon become the face of Bush's White House.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | November 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A lot of political watchers have been wondering whether an "October surprise" might help to save the Republicans from an anticipated disaster in the midterm elections. It appears to have come from Sen. John Kerry. While discussing the value of education during a campaign event this week at Pasadena City College near Los Angeles, the Massachusetts Democrat said: "You know, education, if you make the most of it, you study hard, you do your homework, you make an effort to be smart, you can do well.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Tony Snow, the Fox News radio and television commentator, has agreed to become the White House press secretary, and could be named to the post as early as today, administration officials said yesterday. Unlike the soft-spoken current White House press secretary, Scott McClellan, who announced his resignation last week, Snow is something of a showman. Snow has even written recent columns critical of Bush, arguing that the White House had lost its verve and direction during his second term.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2006
Tony Snow, the White House press secretary, will campaign for Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele today at a private reception in Potomac that will raise $65,000 for the Republican's Senate bid. Tickets to the soiree were $250 to "mix and mingle" and hear Snow's remarks, or $1,000 for a VIP reception and photo opportunity with President Bush's spokesman, a former TV and radio personality. It's Snow's 17th such event since he began stumping for Republican candidates, becoming the first White House press secretary to take on that role.
FEATURES
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | October 25, 1991
TONY SNOW puts words in the President's mouth. He does this without daily conversation with President Bush. He does this smoothly, behind the scenes. This is no snow job.Tony Snow is President George Bush's head speech writer.He is 36 years old and he has "The Look." The unbuttoned top button on the crisp off-white shirt. The tie, slightly askew. Clear, sharp eyes with a strong jaw. The cover boy for "GQ."And yet, Snow is not a front man. If he does his job well, he says, he will stay behind the scenes.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | November 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A lot of political watchers have been wondering whether an "October surprise" might help to save the Republicans from an anticipated disaster in the midterm elections. It appears to have come from Sen. John Kerry. While discussing the value of education during a campaign event this week at Pasadena City College near Los Angeles, the Massachusetts Democrat said: "You know, education, if you make the most of it, you study hard, you do your homework, you make an effort to be smart, you can do well.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | May 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A lot of naysayers are picking apart President Bush's choice of conservative TV host and commentator Tony Snow to be his press secretary. Depending on whom you read or hear, Mr. Snow is either too conservative, too anti-Bush, too loyal, too independent, outspoken or maybe just too darn good-looking for the job. But I think Mr. Bush's selection is smart public relations. In this era of relentless news cycles, the press secretary is an administration's most visible day-to-day connection with the public.
NEWS
April 27, 2006
Nation Bush's strategy with Snow For a president working to restore his sagging popularity, the addition of a fresh face to the White House team in Tony Snow - not to mention one who is a pundit who has bashed President Bush in recent writings - was a message in itself. pg 1a World 1,000 secret CIA flights reported The CIA has conducted more than 1,000 clandestine flights in Europe since 2001, and some of them secretly took away terror suspects to countries where they could face torture, European Union lawmakers said.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2006
Tony Snow, the White House press secretary, will campaign for Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele today at a private reception in Potomac that will raise $65,000 for the Republican's Senate bid. Tickets to the soiree were $250 to "mix and mingle" and hear Snow's remarks, or $1,000 for a VIP reception and photo opportunity with President Bush's spokesman, a former TV and radio personality. It's Snow's 17th such event since he began stumping for Republican candidates, becoming the first White House press secretary to take on that role.
FEATURES
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | July 25, 2006
WASHINGTON-- --Back when Tony Snow was free to speak his mind, he lambasted the news media and President Bush with almost gleeful abandon. Journalists were elitists who "tend to look on the American public with finicky disdain," Snow wrote in a 2004 Web column. Network news thrived on "snob appeal." Reporters "almost never admit an error," and their use of unnamed sources was "slimy" - a way to "make sloppy reporting easier to commit and harder to detect," he wrote last year. As for Bush, he was "something of an embarrassment," a leader afflicted by the "wimp factor," wrote the man who would soon become the face of Bush's White House.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | May 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A lot of naysayers are picking apart President Bush's choice of conservative TV host and commentator Tony Snow to be his press secretary. Depending on whom you read or hear, Mr. Snow is either too conservative, too anti-Bush, too loyal, too independent, outspoken or maybe just too darn good-looking for the job. But I think Mr. Bush's selection is smart public relations. In this era of relentless news cycles, the press secretary is an administration's most visible day-to-day connection with the public.
NEWS
April 27, 2006
Nation Bush's strategy with Snow For a president working to restore his sagging popularity, the addition of a fresh face to the White House team in Tony Snow - not to mention one who is a pundit who has bashed President Bush in recent writings - was a message in itself. pg 1a World 1,000 secret CIA flights reported The CIA has conducted more than 1,000 clandestine flights in Europe since 2001, and some of them secretly took away terror suspects to countries where they could face torture, European Union lawmakers said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Tony Snow, the Fox News radio and television commentator, has agreed to become the White House press secretary, and could be named to the post as early as today, administration officials said yesterday. Unlike the soft-spoken current White House press secretary, Scott McClellan, who announced his resignation last week, Snow is something of a showman. Snow has even written recent columns critical of Bush, arguing that the White House had lost its verve and direction during his second term.
FEATURES
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | October 25, 1991
TONY SNOW puts words in the President's mouth. He does this without daily conversation with President Bush. He does this smoothly, behind the scenes. This is no snow job.Tony Snow is President George Bush's head speech writer.He is 36 years old and he has "The Look." The unbuttoned top button on the crisp off-white shirt. The tie, slightly askew. Clear, sharp eyes with a strong jaw. The cover boy for "GQ."And yet, Snow is not a front man. If he does his job well, he says, he will stay behind the scenes.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 24, 2007
WASHINGTON -- White House press secretary Tony Snow, who underwent surgery in 2005 for colon cancer, said yesterday that a series of medical scans had turned up a small growth in his lower abdomen and that he would have it surgically removed on Monday. He said at least one set of scans was negative, as were blood tests looking for a return of the cancer. "But out of an aggressive sense of caution," he said, he would undergo the surgery.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The White House stepped up its pressure yesterday on senators engaging in direct talks with Syrian leaders, saying their trips to Damascus risk undermining U.S. efforts to encourage democracy in the Middle East. The visits come at a particularly difficult time for the Bush administration, which has largely rejected the recommendation of the bipartisan Iraq Study Group that the United States engage with Syria and Iran to bring the sectarian violence in Iraq under control. The administration's relations with Damascus are in a deep freeze in response to, among other things, suspicions that Syria has been involved in at least two high-profile political assassinations in Lebanon and has blocked international attempts to investigate the killings.
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