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Tony Shore

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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 14, 2007
A Baltimore artist whose portraits of family and friends painted on black velvet capture the poignant and gritty flavor of working class life in the city was named the winner yesterday of this year's Janet and Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize. Tony Shore, 35, accepted the $25,000 award from Mayor Sheila Dixon amid tears of joy and gratitude before a crowd of several hundred assembled at the Baltimore Museum of Art, where the work of the finalists is on display. The award is named after the longtime Baltimore civic leader and his wife.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
The 4-inch-tall vinyl doll with the aquarium for a head contains two chubby, bug-eyed puffer fish floating in shellac sea. In one corner of the tank is a tiny wire and nylon fishing net. Below the neck, the doll resembles a Japanese chef. One hand grasps a fillet knife. Parkville artists Jim Lasher and Ayumi Yasuda are trying to replicate a typical puffer fish restaurant in miniature, so a second vinyl doll has been transformed into a beer vending machine. Inside the case are cans about the size of a shirt button, adorned with the labels of common Asian brands.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,Sun Staff | September 30, 2001
When Baltimore artist Tony Shore found himself needing to respond to the tragedies of Sept. 11, he looked no farther than his old Morrell Park neighborhood, and an existing work of art that needed repair. Shore, a Yale-trained fine artist best-known for his large works on black velvet, had created one of the 180 Fish Out of Water sculptures dotting the Baltimore landscape this summer: Oktavec Fish, celebrating the city's screen-painting heritage and its pioneer, William Oktavec. But just three weeks after taking its place in the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood, Shore's fish was vandalized.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 10, 2008
We asked painter Tony Shore, whose gritty new images of gang violence and street crime are on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery, whether he'd been watching too much TV lately - specifically, The Wire, HBO's police drama about gang violence and street crime in Baltimore. Not at all, Shore replied. Over the past few months he's been far too busy making his signature acrylic-on-black-velvet paintings to watch TV. Still, since winning the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts' $25,000 Sondheim Artscape Prize last summer, Shore has taken his painting in an unexpected direction.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2001
After a day of painting a street mural on a deserted block in Pigtown, a juvenile confided in artist Tony Shore that he hadn't gotten high in four days. "Well, Mr. Tony, that's another day you kept me out of trouble," said the budding artist. Moments like that, Shore said, motivate him to help kids in two of the city's most run-down areas paint swaths of their neighborhoods. You can see their work in Pigtown and Morrell Park, on walls, boarded-up houses, portable classrooms, a police station, a truck and fish sculptures.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | July 16, 2007
As a guy who painted portraits of his family on black velvet, Tony Shore had to have a lot of nerve to even think that what he was doing was art. People said it was too lowbrow to ever be taken seriously, that it was kitsch, or worse. Shore didn't pay them any mind when they told him that at the Maryland Institute College of Art or at Yale University's graduate school, or in New York, where he worked for years as an assistant to abstract painter David Reed. In New York, the world capital of sophisticated taste, Shore covered the walls of his tiny studio with black velvet paintings of Baltimore and the people he'd left behind.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 1, 2000
Realism in modern art was kicked off more than a century ago when Charles Baudelaire called for pictures that depicted "the heroism of modern life." One wonders what the poet would have made of the paintings of Tony Shore, whose acrylic-on-black-velvet images of family and friends in inner-city Baltimore are on display at Gomez Gallery through Aug. 27. Shore is a storyteller and heir to a long tradition of naturalistic painting about the lives of ordinary...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2000
On South Stricker Street, where outsiders are unwelcome unless they have drugs or money to share, Tony Shore has neither. He pulls up in his teal Ford Escort and, like a traveling street vendor, pulls a few unframed paintings from the trunk and props them against the car. His casually hip clothes and Yale sticker in the car window go little noticed by the people who spend every sweltering afternoon on these streets like it's their living room. They have known him all 28 years of his life, since before his clothes were cool, before he could hold a paint brush.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 10, 2008
We asked painter Tony Shore, whose gritty new images of gang violence and street crime are on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery, whether he'd been watching too much TV lately - specifically, The Wire, HBO's police drama about gang violence and street crime in Baltimore. Not at all, Shore replied. Over the past few months he's been far too busy making his signature acrylic-on-black-velvet paintings to watch TV. Still, since winning the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts' $25,000 Sondheim Artscape Prize last summer, Shore has taken his painting in an unexpected direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | July 23, 2000
Is there a Baltimore style of art-making? That's a question that gets asked and asked again, yet produces no definitive answers. The latest essay on the subject is the upcoming show by painter Tony Shore, which opens at Gomez Gallery Saturday. Shore grew up in Baltimore's Pigtown neighborhood, but a talent for drawing allowed him to leave the mean streets there, first for the Maryland Institute, College of Art, where he earned a fine arts degree, and later for Yale University, where he got his M.F.A.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 6, 2008
After seeing Violence and Tranquility, Tony Shore's unexpectedly dark vision of his hometown at C. Grimaldis Gallery, I couldn't help thinking the prize-winning Baltimore painter has been watching The Wire, HBO's award-winning dark drama about crime and corruption in Baltimore. The Wire is classic American film noir for the small screen. Shore's unsparing images of gang warfare and violent crime bring the same moral ambivalence, alienation and gratuitous cruelty to the gallery scene. There's something shocking about this subject matter, though perhaps we shouldn't be surprised that Shore has begun using such imagery recently.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | July 16, 2007
As a guy who painted portraits of his family on black velvet, Tony Shore had to have a lot of nerve to even think that what he was doing was art. People said it was too lowbrow to ever be taken seriously, that it was kitsch, or worse. Shore didn't pay them any mind when they told him that at the Maryland Institute College of Art or at Yale University's graduate school, or in New York, where he worked for years as an assistant to abstract painter David Reed. In New York, the world capital of sophisticated taste, Shore covered the walls of his tiny studio with black velvet paintings of Baltimore and the people he'd left behind.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 14, 2007
A Baltimore artist whose portraits of family and friends painted on black velvet capture the poignant and gritty flavor of working class life in the city was named the winner yesterday of this year's Janet and Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize. Tony Shore, 35, accepted the $25,000 award from Mayor Sheila Dixon amid tears of joy and gratitude before a crowd of several hundred assembled at the Baltimore Museum of Art, where the work of the finalists is on display. The award is named after the longtime Baltimore civic leader and his wife.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2001
After a day of painting a street mural on a deserted block in Pigtown, a juvenile confided in artist Tony Shore that he hadn't gotten high in four days. "Well, Mr. Tony, that's another day you kept me out of trouble," said the budding artist. Moments like that, Shore said, motivate him to help kids in two of the city's most run-down areas paint swaths of their neighborhoods. You can see their work in Pigtown and Morrell Park, on walls, boarded-up houses, portable classrooms, a police station, a truck and fish sculptures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,Sun Staff | September 30, 2001
When Baltimore artist Tony Shore found himself needing to respond to the tragedies of Sept. 11, he looked no farther than his old Morrell Park neighborhood, and an existing work of art that needed repair. Shore, a Yale-trained fine artist best-known for his large works on black velvet, had created one of the 180 Fish Out of Water sculptures dotting the Baltimore landscape this summer: Oktavec Fish, celebrating the city's screen-painting heritage and its pioneer, William Oktavec. But just three weeks after taking its place in the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood, Shore's fish was vandalized.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2000
On South Stricker Street, where outsiders are unwelcome unless they have drugs or money to share, Tony Shore has neither. He pulls up in his teal Ford Escort and, like a traveling street vendor, pulls a few unframed paintings from the trunk and props them against the car. His casually hip clothes and Yale sticker in the car window go little noticed by the people who spend every sweltering afternoon on these streets like it's their living room. They have known him all 28 years of his life, since before his clothes were cool, before he could hold a paint brush.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 6, 2008
After seeing Violence and Tranquility, Tony Shore's unexpectedly dark vision of his hometown at C. Grimaldis Gallery, I couldn't help thinking the prize-winning Baltimore painter has been watching The Wire, HBO's award-winning dark drama about crime and corruption in Baltimore. The Wire is classic American film noir for the small screen. Shore's unsparing images of gang warfare and violent crime bring the same moral ambivalence, alienation and gratuitous cruelty to the gallery scene. There's something shocking about this subject matter, though perhaps we shouldn't be surprised that Shore has begun using such imagery recently.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
The 4-inch-tall vinyl doll with the aquarium for a head contains two chubby, bug-eyed puffer fish floating in shellac sea. In one corner of the tank is a tiny wire and nylon fishing net. Below the neck, the doll resembles a Japanese chef. One hand grasps a fillet knife. Parkville artists Jim Lasher and Ayumi Yasuda are trying to replicate a typical puffer fish restaurant in miniature, so a second vinyl doll has been transformed into a beer vending machine. Inside the case are cans about the size of a shirt button, adorned with the labels of common Asian brands.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 1, 2000
Realism in modern art was kicked off more than a century ago when Charles Baudelaire called for pictures that depicted "the heroism of modern life." One wonders what the poet would have made of the paintings of Tony Shore, whose acrylic-on-black-velvet images of family and friends in inner-city Baltimore are on display at Gomez Gallery through Aug. 27. Shore is a storyteller and heir to a long tradition of naturalistic painting about the lives of ordinary...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | July 23, 2000
Is there a Baltimore style of art-making? That's a question that gets asked and asked again, yet produces no definitive answers. The latest essay on the subject is the upcoming show by painter Tony Shore, which opens at Gomez Gallery Saturday. Shore grew up in Baltimore's Pigtown neighborhood, but a talent for drawing allowed him to leave the mean streets there, first for the Maryland Institute, College of Art, where he earned a fine arts degree, and later for Yale University, where he got his M.F.A.
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