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By Los Angeles Times | November 28, 1991
New York -- It was the first public performance of the National Actors Theatre. Martin Sheen was ready. Michael York was ready. But Fritz Weaver had laryngitis and couldn't go on.Just before "The Crucible" was to begin last week, Tony Randall went onstage to tell the packed Belasco Theatre audience about Mr. Weaver's unexpected illness. And when Deputy Governor Danforth made his appearance in the second act, Mr. Randall was playing Mr. Weaver's part.So what if Mr. Randall was reading from a script?
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By KEVIN COWHERD | October 11, 2004
I SEE WHERE Billy Joel, the Piano Man himself, just got married for the third time in a traditional ceremony at his sprawling Long Island estate -- well, traditional in the sense that everyone spent the entire time ducking the paparazzi. Big deal, you say. Celebrities like Billy Joel are always getting married for the third time. These people go through marriages the way the rest of us go through socks. OK, fine. But this time, Joel, who's 55, married a 23-year-old named Katie Lee. Which means she's only five years older than his daughter, Alexa Ray. Talk about robbing the cradle -- that's robbing the incubator.
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NEWS
August 7, 2004
On July 26, 2004, KENNETH FREDERICK ROLOSON, 87, of Englewood, FL, Mr. Roloson was born February 19, 1917 in Bronx, NY to Augustus F., and Minnie E. (Seitz) Roloson. He was raised in Baltimore, MD, and graduated from Baltimore City College in 1935. Kenneth was employed with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad for over 40 years, retiring in 1976 at Dayton, OH, as Division Sales Manager of freight and moved to Englewood, FL, that year. He was a member of Masonic Lodge #706 F& A.M. in Lima, OH, Scottish Rite- Valley of Dayton, OH, Charter Member and one of the original Greeters of Sahib Temple Shrine, Sarasota, FL, Court 189 Royal Order of Jesters, Sarasota, FL, Venice Shrine Club, Venice, FL, and a member of the National Railway Historic Society.
NEWS
August 7, 2004
On July 26, 2004, KENNETH FREDERICK ROLOSON, 87, of Englewood, FL, Mr. Roloson was born February 19, 1917 in Bronx, NY to Augustus F., and Minnie E. (Seitz) Roloson. He was raised in Baltimore, MD, and graduated from Baltimore City College in 1935. Kenneth was employed with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad for over 40 years, retiring in 1976 at Dayton, OH, as Division Sales Manager of freight and moved to Englewood, FL, that year. He was a member of Masonic Lodge #706 F& A.M. in Lima, OH, Scottish Rite- Valley of Dayton, OH, Charter Member and one of the original Greeters of Sahib Temple Shrine, Sarasota, FL, Court 189 Royal Order of Jesters, Sarasota, FL, Venice Shrine Club, Venice, FL, and a member of the National Railway Historic Society.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1997
"Casablanca" as a TV series?Been done already -- with David Soul ("Starsky and Hutch") filling in for Humphrey Bogart.That horrific little piece of TV trivia is one of many that TCM viewers will be reminded of this week, as the folks at Turner pay tribute to movies that were later turned into television series.But don't fret. No one's asking you to sit through TV's version of Rick's Cafe (either the 1983 version, with Soul, or the 1955 version, starring Charles McGraw).No, that would be cruel.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 19, 2004
While a 1970s sitcom role as an obsessive-compulsive photographer sharing an apartment with a slob of a sportswriter came to define Tony Randall's persona in the public mind, it was only the second act in a life that seemed to be lived as an intelligently crafted three-act play. His was a reputation built in the movies, refined in prime-time television and then fulfilled on the stage. Along the way, while he was never a leading man, Randall, through this persona, did as much as any actor of his generation to shape and question the very notion of masculinity.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | December 24, 1990
TEN YEARS ago Philip Anglim appeared at the Mechanic Theatre in a lauded production of "The Elephant Man." For his interpretation on Broadway of the tragically misshapen John Merrick, Anglim garnered the prestigious Tony Award.Now the actor is back at the Mechanic, starring with A. Mappa through Dec. 30 in David Henry Hwang's bizarre but brilliant work, "M. Butterfly," the winner of the 1988 Tony as Best Play.Hwang's play attempts to dispel the stereotypes associated with Eastern and Western cultural and sexual mores.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 11, 2004
I SEE WHERE Billy Joel, the Piano Man himself, just got married for the third time in a traditional ceremony at his sprawling Long Island estate -- well, traditional in the sense that everyone spent the entire time ducking the paparazzi. Big deal, you say. Celebrities like Billy Joel are always getting married for the third time. These people go through marriages the way the rest of us go through socks. OK, fine. But this time, Joel, who's 55, married a 23-year-old named Katie Lee. Which means she's only five years older than his daughter, Alexa Ray. Talk about robbing the cradle -- that's robbing the incubator.
NEWS
August 6, 2007
WILLIAM J. TUTTLE, 95 Movie makeup artist Movie makeup artist William J. Tuttle, who created the shaggy Morlocks of The Time Machine, the monster's mug for Young Frankenstein and turned Tony Randall into a circus full of legends for 7 Faces of Dr. Lao, died July 30 of complications related to old age at his home in Pacific Palisades, Calif. Mr. Tuttle influenced generations of makeup artists and worked on hundreds of movies from the 1930s until his final film, Zorro, the Gay Blade, in 1981.
NEWS
May 19, 2004
NATIONAL 9/11 hearings move to N.Y. The latest round of public hearings held by the 9/11 Commission brought members to Lower Manhattan, just one mile from Ground Zero, and shifted the subject of the investigation from the federal government's alleged intelligence failures to possible deficiencies in New York City's emergency response procedures. [Page 1a] Abuse suspects use single defense Most of the lawyers for the U.S. soldiers accused of abusing Iraqi prisoners have lined up behind a single defense strategy: the notion that their clients were simply following orders to soften up detainees for interrogators.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 19, 2004
While a 1970s sitcom role as an obsessive-compulsive photographer sharing an apartment with a slob of a sportswriter came to define Tony Randall's persona in the public mind, it was only the second act in a life that seemed to be lived as an intelligently crafted three-act play. His was a reputation built in the movies, refined in prime-time television and then fulfilled on the stage. Along the way, while he was never a leading man, Randall, through this persona, did as much as any actor of his generation to shape and question the very notion of masculinity.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1997
"Casablanca" as a TV series?Been done already -- with David Soul ("Starsky and Hutch") filling in for Humphrey Bogart.That horrific little piece of TV trivia is one of many that TCM viewers will be reminded of this week, as the folks at Turner pay tribute to movies that were later turned into television series.But don't fret. No one's asking you to sit through TV's version of Rick's Cafe (either the 1983 version, with Soul, or the 1955 version, starring Charles McGraw).No, that would be cruel.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 28, 1991
New York -- It was the first public performance of the National Actors Theatre. Martin Sheen was ready. Michael York was ready. But Fritz Weaver had laryngitis and couldn't go on.Just before "The Crucible" was to begin last week, Tony Randall went onstage to tell the packed Belasco Theatre audience about Mr. Weaver's unexpected illness. And when Deputy Governor Danforth made his appearance in the second act, Mr. Randall was playing Mr. Weaver's part.So what if Mr. Randall was reading from a script?
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | December 24, 1990
TEN YEARS ago Philip Anglim appeared at the Mechanic Theatre in a lauded production of "The Elephant Man." For his interpretation on Broadway of the tragically misshapen John Merrick, Anglim garnered the prestigious Tony Award.Now the actor is back at the Mechanic, starring with A. Mappa through Dec. 30 in David Henry Hwang's bizarre but brilliant work, "M. Butterfly," the winner of the 1988 Tony as Best Play.Hwang's play attempts to dispel the stereotypes associated with Eastern and Western cultural and sexual mores.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 20, 2000
The latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program celebrates pianos, pianists and composers who were great pianists. For good measure, it throws in a whimsical poet and a veteran of stage and screen who knows how to milk a good verse. It's quite an evening, without a dull minute in it. Last night at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the electricity gained in intensity as the number of keyboards in use declined -- Mozart's Concerto for Three Pianos, to Saint-Saens' "Carnival of the Animals" for two pianos and orchestra, to Rachmaninoff's powerhouse D minor Piano Concerto.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Sun Reporter | September 17, 2006
Justin Nicholson outleaped one defender and eluded three others en route to an 84-yard, fourth-quarter touchdown on a halfback option pass, and the New Town defense made it stand for yesterday's critical, 6-3 Baltimore County 2A-1A League victory over visiting Eastern Tech on a muddy field. The win was the first over a program with a winning record by the Titans (2-0 overall, 2-0 league), a third-year varsity program under Rich Stichel Jr. "We've had six shutouts in our last seven victories, so there's no shame in giving up three points against Eastern Tech," said Stichel, 28, a 1995 graduate of Eastern Tech who credited Chad Briscoe (13 tackles)
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