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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | January 8, 1995
Two Tony Awards and a Pulitzer Prize later, it's hard to believe that when he had written the first 50 pages of "Angels in America," Tony Kushner felt "it was a piece of dreck, and I was blowing it."He needn't have worried. The two-part epic drama about politics, religion and AIDS is now playing worldwide, touring the United States and being made into a movie. It's also the force behind a new Kushner play that opens Wednesday at Center Stage -- "Slavs! (Thinking About the Longstanding Problems of Virtue and Happiness)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
The production of Caroline, or Change currently running at Center Stage sears the audience's hearts like a hot iron. First, this show pulls and warps the delicate tissue. Then, it leaves a scorch mark. Finally, it burns clean through. And, like all such traumas, there's a slight, delayed reaction before we start to sting. We're so taken by the playfulness of the singing appliances (such as a washing machine, dryer and radio), so entranced by the humor, so swept up by the loveliness of the performers' voices, that we don't notice until the next day, that there is a spot in our hearts that is alive with sensation, and that is tender when pressed.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 24, 1995
The identifications of actors Peter Birkenhead and Robert Sella of "Angels in America" were transposed in a photo caption in yesterday's Today section. Robert Sella is pictured at the top.The Sun regrets the error.At times funny, at times ugly, at times mystical -- always challenging -- "Angels in America" is the most extraordinarily imaginative piece of American theater to surface in years.That such a serious, risky work made it to Broadway is a near miracle; that it is now touring and has come to Baltimore is proof that there are indeed angels in America.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 22, 2006
PRIME-TIME TELEVISION MIGHT SEEM like the last realm in which one would expect to find historical truth. Three decades of network docudramas carelessly mixing fiction and fact on everyone from Thomas Jefferson to the Kennedys of Massachusetts is largely responsible for that. But tonight on the Discovery cable channel comes Munich: The Real Assassins, a British documentary that goes a long way toward setting the record straight on the 1970's Israeli campaign to kill PLO operatives that became the basis for the controversial Steven Spielberg film, Munich.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 14, 1998
Two-thirds of the way through AXIS Theatre's forceful production of Tony Kushner's 1993 Pulitzer Prize-winning "Angels in America: Millennium Approaches," there's a scene depicting the break-up of each of the play's two central couples -- one gay and the other Mormon.The break-ups are staged simultaneously and, as directed by Brian Klaas, the scene begins with the two men who are about to desert their lovers posed side by side. As the couples argue, their words intersect and overlap. The four participants are very specific individuals, and yet seen in this way, the shards of their relationships come together to form one broad kaleidoscopic picture of heartbreak, disappointment, anger and misunderstanding.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 22, 2006
PRIME-TIME TELEVISION MIGHT SEEM like the last realm in which one would expect to find historical truth. Three decades of network docudramas carelessly mixing fiction and fact on everyone from Thomas Jefferson to the Kennedys of Massachusetts is largely responsible for that. But tonight on the Discovery cable channel comes Munich: The Real Assassins, a British documentary that goes a long way toward setting the record straight on the 1970's Israeli campaign to kill PLO operatives that became the basis for the controversial Steven Spielberg film, Munich.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 6, 1993
The competition for best play and best musical in tonight's Tony Awards boils down to a contest between two nominees in each category. Here's a look at the favorites:BEST PLAY"Angels in America: Millennium Approaches"Tony Kushner, playwrightKushner's epic examination of AIDS, religion and politicincludes characters ranging from an angel to McCarthyite lawyer Roy Cohn. It has garnered a record number of nominations (nine) for a non-musical."The Sisters Rosensweig"Wendy Wasserstein, playwrightThis warm, funny, poignant play chronicles the reunion of three Jewish-American middle-aged sisters in London.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 26, 1993
Bigger was better and more was more in theater in 1993.This was the year that two mega-plays, Tony Kushner's "Angels in America" (two parts clocking in at seven hours) and Robert Schenkkan's "The Kentucky Cycle" (two parts clocking in at six hours), made it to Broadway and disproved the common wisdom that attention spans are shrinking."The Kentucky Cycle" re-examined existing myths -- those of the American pioneer. Although the show closed prematurely in New York earlier this month, area audiences got a chance to see it during a pre-Broadway run at Washington's Kennedy Center last fall.
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | June 5, 1996
IT'S ONLY Life magazine, I keep telling myself. But if you're a baby boomer, and chances are good that you are, you may find the current Life cover story more than a little disturbing.What Life has done is compile a list of the 50 most influential boomers -- derived from those 76 million Americans born between 1946 and 1964.The list is frightening. And not just because scare-master Stephen King is ranked No. 30. What's scary is that he's the only novelist on the list. What's scarier still is that it's hard to think of an American novelist currently under the age of 50 who actually belongs on the list.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 20, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- Some people expect him to bark or bite. Others shy away.Jonathan Hadary has never experienced anything like this before. But he takes it as a compliment. After all, the actor is playing Roy Cohn.Sen. Joseph McCarthy's right-hand man during the Communist witch hunts of the 1950s, Cohn is the character Hadary describes as "the devil" in "Angels in America."An imaginative and inspiring two-part, seven-hour epic by Tony Kushner, "Angels" interweaves the stories of two couples: one homosexual and the other Mormon (and ostensibly straight)
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 23, 2005
The best gag in Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park came when the T. rex popped up in the rearview mirror of a speeding Jeep over the words, "Objects in the mirror may be closer than they appear." In their turgid, sermonizing anti-thriller Munich, Spielberg and Tony Kushner (Angels in America) look in history's rearview mirror and aim for the same effect. Their movie is ostensibly about the aftermath to the Palestinian terrorist slaughter of 11 members of the Israeli Olympic squad during the 1972 Summer Games.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 14, 1998
Two-thirds of the way through AXIS Theatre's forceful production of Tony Kushner's 1993 Pulitzer Prize-winning "Angels in America: Millennium Approaches," there's a scene depicting the break-up of each of the play's two central couples -- one gay and the other Mormon.The break-ups are staged simultaneously and, as directed by Brian Klaas, the scene begins with the two men who are about to desert their lovers posed side by side. As the couples argue, their words intersect and overlap. The four participants are very specific individuals, and yet seen in this way, the shards of their relationships come together to form one broad kaleidoscopic picture of heartbreak, disappointment, anger and misunderstanding.
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | June 5, 1996
IT'S ONLY Life magazine, I keep telling myself. But if you're a baby boomer, and chances are good that you are, you may find the current Life cover story more than a little disturbing.What Life has done is compile a list of the 50 most influential boomers -- derived from those 76 million Americans born between 1946 and 1964.The list is frightening. And not just because scare-master Stephen King is ranked No. 30. What's scary is that he's the only novelist on the list. What's scarier still is that it's hard to think of an American novelist currently under the age of 50 who actually belongs on the list.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 24, 1995
The identifications of actors Peter Birkenhead and Robert Sella of "Angels in America" were transposed in a photo caption in yesterday's Today section. Robert Sella is pictured at the top.The Sun regrets the error.At times funny, at times ugly, at times mystical -- always challenging -- "Angels in America" is the most extraordinarily imaginative piece of American theater to surface in years.That such a serious, risky work made it to Broadway is a near miracle; that it is now touring and has come to Baltimore is proof that there are indeed angels in America.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 20, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- Some people expect him to bark or bite. Others shy away.Jonathan Hadary has never experienced anything like this before. But he takes it as a compliment. After all, the actor is playing Roy Cohn.Sen. Joseph McCarthy's right-hand man during the Communist witch hunts of the 1950s, Cohn is the character Hadary describes as "the devil" in "Angels in America."An imaginative and inspiring two-part, seven-hour epic by Tony Kushner, "Angels" interweaves the stories of two couples: one homosexual and the other Mormon (and ostensibly straight)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | January 8, 1995
Two Tony Awards and a Pulitzer Prize later, it's hard to believe that when he had written the first 50 pages of "Angels in America," Tony Kushner felt "it was a piece of dreck, and I was blowing it."He needn't have worried. The two-part epic drama about politics, religion and AIDS is now playing worldwide, touring the United States and being made into a movie. It's also the force behind a new Kushner play that opens Wednesday at Center Stage -- "Slavs! (Thinking About the Longstanding Problems of Virtue and Happiness)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
The production of Caroline, or Change currently running at Center Stage sears the audience's hearts like a hot iron. First, this show pulls and warps the delicate tissue. Then, it leaves a scorch mark. Finally, it burns clean through. And, like all such traumas, there's a slight, delayed reaction before we start to sting. We're so taken by the playfulness of the singing appliances (such as a washing machine, dryer and radio), so entranced by the humor, so swept up by the loveliness of the performers' voices, that we don't notice until the next day, that there is a spot in our hearts that is alive with sensation, and that is tender when pressed.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 23, 2005
The best gag in Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park came when the T. rex popped up in the rearview mirror of a speeding Jeep over the words, "Objects in the mirror may be closer than they appear." In their turgid, sermonizing anti-thriller Munich, Spielberg and Tony Kushner (Angels in America) look in history's rearview mirror and aim for the same effect. Their movie is ostensibly about the aftermath to the Palestinian terrorist slaughter of 11 members of the Israeli Olympic squad during the 1972 Summer Games.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 26, 1993
Bigger was better and more was more in theater in 1993.This was the year that two mega-plays, Tony Kushner's "Angels in America" (two parts clocking in at seven hours) and Robert Schenkkan's "The Kentucky Cycle" (two parts clocking in at six hours), made it to Broadway and disproved the common wisdom that attention spans are shrinking."The Kentucky Cycle" re-examined existing myths -- those of the American pioneer. Although the show closed prematurely in New York earlier this month, area audiences got a chance to see it during a pre-Broadway run at Washington's Kennedy Center last fall.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 6, 1993
The competition for best play and best musical in tonight's Tony Awards boils down to a contest between two nominees in each category. Here's a look at the favorites:BEST PLAY"Angels in America: Millennium Approaches"Tony Kushner, playwrightKushner's epic examination of AIDS, religion and politicincludes characters ranging from an angel to McCarthyite lawyer Roy Cohn. It has garnered a record number of nominations (nine) for a non-musical."The Sisters Rosensweig"Wendy Wasserstein, playwrightThis warm, funny, poignant play chronicles the reunion of three Jewish-American middle-aged sisters in London.
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