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Tony Fulton

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NEWS
January 28, 1999
THE General Assembly's ethics committee wasted little time Tuesday whitewashing what seems like a clear breach of legislative behavior. The members found nothing wrong in a delegate pocketing a $9,000 real-estate fee thrown his way by two lobbyists. There wasn't even a cursory investigation.No one was interviewed, not Del. Tony E. Fulton or the two lobbyists who steered the lucrative fee to him. Indeed, the group simply accepted Mr. Fulton's written explanation that the deal met the letter of the law. Then, to cover themselves, panel members agreed to warn Mr. Fulton about "an appearance of impropriety."
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 2, 2005
Returning to Baltimore City College for the first time in decades, Bob Terpening couldn't remember the day that Art Thompson bit Tony Fulton in wrestling practice. "I guess I reacted calmly," Terpening said, flashing a smile that appeared just a little mischievous. Terpening - who coached football, wrestling and track for City College from the mid-1960s until the early 1970s and who was inducted into the school's Hall of Fame on Friday - knew he had just made an inside joke only his former charges in those several sports would understand.
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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | May 7, 1992
Del. Tony E. Fulton -- accused of misconduct and pocketing $3,000 in campaign funds -- has told a Baltimore Circuit Court jury that he did not steal campaign money during his 1990 re-election bid.The case has begun to turn somewhat in the delegate's favor, with three of the six charges against him now dismissed and several of his campaign workers taking the stand to corroborate his story."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 25, 2005
KEEP LOW," Tony urged. "You've got to keep low." Tony Fulton hunched over and bent his torso forward until it was almost parallel with the floor. We were in a locker room at City College sometime during the 1966-1967 wrestling season. Fulton was a strapping 180-pounder. I was a skinny 129-pound geekling trying to master the wrestling learning curve. It was a curve that I never quite got around. But it was Fulton, without any encouragement from coaches or other teammates, who decided to try and help this kid navigate his way through his first year of the toughest sport there is. Before we joined City College's junior varsity wrestling team, I didn't know Tony Fulton from Tony the Tiger.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 25, 2005
KEEP LOW," Tony urged. "You've got to keep low." Tony Fulton hunched over and bent his torso forward until it was almost parallel with the floor. We were in a locker room at City College sometime during the 1966-1967 wrestling season. Fulton was a strapping 180-pounder. I was a skinny 129-pound geekling trying to master the wrestling learning curve. It was a curve that I never quite got around. But it was Fulton, without any encouragement from coaches or other teammates, who decided to try and help this kid navigate his way through his first year of the toughest sport there is. Before we joined City College's junior varsity wrestling team, I didn't know Tony Fulton from Tony the Tiger.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 15, 1999
CLINTON BASHERS -- and a lot of supporters -- blame the president for dissing his office. The public's respect for Congress could fall off the charts with Clinton's trial in the Senate. Opinion polls and voter turnout indicate lousy attitudes toward the political system. But remember what Tip O'Neill said: All politics is local. A local politician who scuffs up his office contributes as much to the public's low opinions as all that nasty partisanship in Washington does.So now we have the matter of Tony Fulton, state delegate from West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | August 12, 1999
SOME PEOPLE get it. Carl Stokes, for example, and Martin O'Malley, too. And legislators such as Clarence Blount and Jim Campbell and Tony Fulton who stand on one side of the street, and those such as Pete Rawlings and Joan Carter Conway standing on the other, but not so far away that they can't hear echoes of each other's heartbeats in the midst of political struggle.And some people don't get it. Julius Henson, for example, and Nathaniel McFadden, too. Henson tried to turn this mayoral campaign into the slummy revival of 1995.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 3, 2004
THE SON WAS angry much of the time, and is angry still. But the anger has a different target now. The son went to public school and the father went away on the railroad, and this was supposed to change the whole country. But the son stands there in the old Camden Yards train station and remembers his father's struggle, while a few blocks away, at the federal courthouse, school officials prepare to defend themselves today, and to explain all of the lost years. The son is Del. Tony Fulton.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 2, 2005
Returning to Baltimore City College for the first time in decades, Bob Terpening couldn't remember the day that Art Thompson bit Tony Fulton in wrestling practice. "I guess I reacted calmly," Terpening said, flashing a smile that appeared just a little mischievous. Terpening - who coached football, wrestling and track for City College from the mid-1960s until the early 1970s and who was inducted into the school's Hall of Fame on Friday - knew he had just made an inside joke only his former charges in those several sports would understand.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | December 13, 1998
Mission: To provide instruction in the visual and performing arts, including dance, voice, piano, theater, and arts and crafts; to provide space for local and traveling exhibits that are of interest to the community; to serve as the home of the Eubie Blake Museum - a repository of memorabilia of the ragtime and musical theater composer and other jazz greats born in Baltimore, including Billie Holiday, Cab Calloway, Chick Webb and Avon Long; and to preserve...
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Phillip McGowan and Ivan Penn and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
Del. Tony E. Fulton, an 18-year veteran of the Maryland General Assembly who was known for taking on the political establishment and for tactics that at times raised ethical concerns, died Friday night of a cancer-related illness at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 53. His wife of 29 years, Jacqueline Fulton, said that she, his two daughters, his brother and friends were at Mr. Fulton's side when he died at 10:30 p.m. A lifelong Democrat, Mr. Fulton frequently criticized his party for failing to deal effectively with drugs, crime and troubled schools in his native Baltimore.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 3, 2004
THE SON WAS angry much of the time, and is angry still. But the anger has a different target now. The son went to public school and the father went away on the railroad, and this was supposed to change the whole country. But the son stands there in the old Camden Yards train station and remembers his father's struggle, while a few blocks away, at the federal courthouse, school officials prepare to defend themselves today, and to explain all of the lost years. The son is Del. Tony Fulton.
NEWS
November 28, 1999
Belair-Edison area was ill-served by Sun's recent articleHaving lived in Belair-Edison for almost 50 years and been connected with the community organization for most of that time, I feel not only qualified but obligated to comment on The Sun's recent article about the neighborhood ("Rebuilding, block by block," Nov. 17)The article, while promoting efforts to improve the area, over-emphasized what is wrong with it, sometimes erroneously.The article suggested that the neighborhood has a reputation for rising crime.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | August 12, 1999
SOME PEOPLE get it. Carl Stokes, for example, and Martin O'Malley, too. And legislators such as Clarence Blount and Jim Campbell and Tony Fulton who stand on one side of the street, and those such as Pete Rawlings and Joan Carter Conway standing on the other, but not so far away that they can't hear echoes of each other's heartbeats in the midst of political struggle.And some people don't get it. Julius Henson, for example, and Nathaniel McFadden, too. Henson tried to turn this mayoral campaign into the slummy revival of 1995.
NEWS
January 28, 1999
THE General Assembly's ethics committee wasted little time Tuesday whitewashing what seems like a clear breach of legislative behavior. The members found nothing wrong in a delegate pocketing a $9,000 real-estate fee thrown his way by two lobbyists. There wasn't even a cursory investigation.No one was interviewed, not Del. Tony E. Fulton or the two lobbyists who steered the lucrative fee to him. Indeed, the group simply accepted Mr. Fulton's written explanation that the deal met the letter of the law. Then, to cover themselves, panel members agreed to warn Mr. Fulton about "an appearance of impropriety."
NEWS
January 15, 1999
WHEN two of the biggest lobbyists in Annapolis throw a $9,000 real estate commission to a state delegate, what do you call it? Legalized bribery? An innocent business arrangement?Try a black mark on the Maryland General Assembly.Lobbyists Gerard E. Evans and John R. Stierhoff knew that steering a lucrative office-building sale to Baltimore Del. Tony E. Fulton would earn brownie points with the legislator. When Mr. Fulton votes on hundreds of bills affecting Evans-Stierhoff clients, he'll remember this windfall.
NEWS
November 28, 1999
Belair-Edison area was ill-served by Sun's recent articleHaving lived in Belair-Edison for almost 50 years and been connected with the community organization for most of that time, I feel not only qualified but obligated to comment on The Sun's recent article about the neighborhood ("Rebuilding, block by block," Nov. 17)The article, while promoting efforts to improve the area, over-emphasized what is wrong with it, sometimes erroneously.The article suggested that the neighborhood has a reputation for rising crime.
NEWS
January 15, 1999
WHEN two of the biggest lobbyists in Annapolis throw a $9,000 real estate commission to a state delegate, what do you call it? Legalized bribery? An innocent business arrangement?Try a black mark on the Maryland General Assembly.Lobbyists Gerard E. Evans and John R. Stierhoff knew that steering a lucrative office-building sale to Baltimore Del. Tony E. Fulton would earn brownie points with the legislator. When Mr. Fulton votes on hundreds of bills affecting Evans-Stierhoff clients, he'll remember this windfall.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 15, 1999
CLINTON BASHERS -- and a lot of supporters -- blame the president for dissing his office. The public's respect for Congress could fall off the charts with Clinton's trial in the Senate. Opinion polls and voter turnout indicate lousy attitudes toward the political system. But remember what Tip O'Neill said: All politics is local. A local politician who scuffs up his office contributes as much to the public's low opinions as all that nasty partisanship in Washington does.So now we have the matter of Tony Fulton, state delegate from West Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | December 13, 1998
Mission: To provide instruction in the visual and performing arts, including dance, voice, piano, theater, and arts and crafts; to provide space for local and traveling exhibits that are of interest to the community; to serve as the home of the Eubie Blake Museum - a repository of memorabilia of the ragtime and musical theater composer and other jazz greats born in Baltimore, including Billie Holiday, Cab Calloway, Chick Webb and Avon Long; and to preserve...
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