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Susan Reimer | February 3, 2014
When the peaches start to come in, you have to get to the Annapolis farmers' market early on Saturday mornings. The lines at the Harris Orchard truck are polite but long, snaking out into the parking lot on Riva Road. And the peaches disappear quickly. The women making the sales and the change can look stressed by the demand, but Tony Evans never did. He'd ask you when you wanted to eat your peaches, today or later in the week? He'd choose just the right firmness for you and then spend a couple more minutes teaching you how to know when a peach is at the peak of flavor.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 3, 2014
When the peaches start to come in, you have to get to the Annapolis farmers' market early on Saturday mornings. The lines at the Harris Orchard truck are polite but long, snaking out into the parking lot on Riva Road. And the peaches disappear quickly. The women making the sales and the change can look stressed by the demand, but Tony Evans never did. He'd ask you when you wanted to eat your peaches, today or later in the week? He'd choose just the right firmness for you and then spend a couple more minutes teaching you how to know when a peach is at the peak of flavor.
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NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2002
Tony Evans, He is the prince of peas, the titan of tomatoes, the duke of cukes. Call Tony Evans, the coordinator of farmers' markets for the state Department of Agriculture, and prepare to hear him sing the praises of Maryland-grown strawberries and wax poetic about wax beans. But on a sweltering summer morning last week, Evans was uncharacteristically quiet. He was worried. With less than an hour to go before the opening of the newly established farmers' market at the Village of Cross Keys, only one farm had arrived to set up. The cabbages from Richardson Farms in White Marsh were deep purple and perfect, their glistening ears of Silver Princess corn had been picked hours earlier.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2002
Tony Evans, He is the prince of peas, the titan of tomatoes, the duke of cukes. Call Tony Evans, the coordinator of farmers' markets for the state Department of Agriculture, and prepare to hear him sing the praises of Maryland-grown strawberries and wax poetic about wax beans. But on a sweltering summer morning last week, Evans was uncharacteristically quiet. He was worried. With less than an hour to go before the opening of the newly established farmers' market at the Village of Cross Keys, only one farm had arrived to set up. The cabbages from Richardson Farms in White Marsh were deep purple and perfect, their glistening ears of Silver Princess corn had been picked hours earlier.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff ytB | October 16, 1991
GOOD NEWS for fruit fanatics: It's a bumper-crop year for apples, despite the early summer drought that threatened to ruin the entire harvest season.Thanks to late summer rain, Maryland farmers are expected to pick 75 million pounds of apples this year. Last year, 33 million pounds were picked.Considering the weather we had, it was a pretty good year," said Tony Evans, spokesman for the state Department of Agriculture.In fact, the drought's a blessing in disguise, giving fruit-eaters smaller yet sweeter yet sweeter apples, he said."
FEATURES
By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,Contributing Writer | June 21, 1995
Most of us are pretty picky about our produce these days.We want fresh fruits and vegetables that are high in taste and nutrition, and many of us would like produce grown with fewer pesticides. If we can't grow it ourselves, the next best alternative may be buying directly from the producer at a local farmers' market.That's becoming easier and more convenient. This year alone, new markets are starting up in Pikesville, Prince George's County, Dunkirk, Leonardtown and Westminster, Abingdon and Aberdeen Proving Ground -- swelling the number of farmers' markets statewide to 64. The increasing demand for fresh produce also means that more markets are opening for two days instead of just one day.In light of the added convenience of extended hours and locations, Tony Evans, a market developer for the Maryland Department of Agriculture, asks: "Why not eat produce at the peak of flavor?"
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1994
Business has been booming at the Jones Station Farmers Market and in a few weeks patrons will have more than fresh fruits and vegetables from which to pick.A seafood vendor will be setting up shop at the market that is open every Saturday from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. on the lot of the MTA park-and-ride station."We expect to have live crabs and soft shell crabs," said Tony Evans of the state Department of Agriculture Market Division, which sponsors the market. "We are getting them from a waterman in Baltimore, and eventually we are going to have enough business to get another waterman."
NEWS
By Brendan Kearney and Brendan Kearney,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2002
The 23rd annual Towson Farmers' Market opens for the season on Thursday, offering fresh fruit, vegetables, flowers and other produce from local farms to area residents and office workers. The market, open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursdays from now until Oct. 30, features items grown by 20 farmers from the surrounding counties and southern Pennsylvania. Each vendor operates a stand on the block of Allegheny Avenue between Washington Avenue and York Road. While the market attracts casual lunchtime traffic, "it's a destination point" for other people, said Tony Evans, farmers' market coordinator for the state Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff Frank D. Roylance contributed to this story | June 18, 1991
A series of slow-moving thunderstorms dumped several inches of rain today on scattered sections of Maryland south and north of Baltimore, causing some road flooding and power outages.The heaviest rains skirted Baltimore-Washington International Airport, where barely 0.13 inches was recorded through 7 a.m. But in Annapolis, about 1.62 inches had fallen. Weather service reporting stations said nearly 3.10 inches of rain fell at College Park, 3.32 inches at Damascus and 2.05 inches at Silver Spring.
NEWS
By Andy Bridges and Andy Bridges,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2003
The Towson Farmers' Market will begin its 24th season tomorrow with sales of fresh fruits, vegetables and flowers. The weekly market, which will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. every Thursday through October, takes place on Allegheny Avenue, between Washington Avenue and the Towson traffic circle. "To celebrate the opening day of the farmers' market, there will be, among other things, a balloon sculptor on hand, making balloon animals for children," said Suzan Doordan, executive director of the Towson Business Association.
NEWS
August 16, 2001
FEARING outbreaks of salmonella, health inspectors have banned the sale of unrefrigerated eggs at Baltimore's popular downtown Farmers' Market. Is this going too far? We don't think so. As new virulent strains of salmonella have appeared, prudence requires that particularly the vulnerable - infants, children and old people - are protected against the preventable dangers of food poisoning. Some patrons and vendors are upset at the crackdown, which has effectively eliminated egg sellers from the Sunday morning market.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2002
Retailers have known for years that coupons bring in customers, but you would be hard-pressed to find farmers issuing "20 percent off" vouchers. Until now. Every public school kindergartner in Howard County -- all 2,875 -- received a booklet of coupons in recent weeks, redeemable at nine local farms and one cafe that buys its ingredients from farmers. The county's Economic Development Authority coordinated the effort to target families most likely to want hands-on time with animals, crops and corn mazes.
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