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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
Heading to a crab house for a feast is fun, but nothing beats an afternoon of crabs in the backyard. Here are some tips for planning a feast of your own: Dress the part: Crab feasts are a dirty business; expect to get messy. Jen Harris, an upstate New York native who moved to Baltimore in 2010, learned this the hard way at her first crab feast. "Do not wear a dry clean-only blouse with white jeans," she warns. "Wear clothing you don't care about. " Set the table: Long, outdoor tables are ideal for crab feasting, but any table covered in newspaper or brown paper will do. Set mallets, knives and rolls of paper towels within easy grabbing distance of pickers (experienced pickers will appreciate bowls of water for hand-rinsing, too)
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NEWS
For The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2013
Third in a three-part series. There's no denying that soft-shell crabs are a little weird. They're slimy and slippery when raw. Cooked in a sandwich, their spindly legs and grabby claws poke out from the slices of bread and make some people wonder, "Do you seriously think I'm going to eat that?" And although even some lifelong crab-loving Marylanders believe soft-shell crabs to be a different species than the well-known blue crab, they are in fact the same creature. Soft crabs are simply blue crabs that have recently molted, shedding their hard shells to reveal a paper-thin exoskeleton that hardens within hours.
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
Buying crabs is a fairly straightforward proposition - if you know what you want. Below are a few tips about what to expect and what to look for when buying crabs: • Specify gender: Crab gender is easy to distinguish: male crabs (or "jimmies") have a narrow, T-shaped "apron" on the back of their shell, while female crabs ("sooks") have a wide apron. In addition, live females have red-tipped claws, while male claws are blue. While both can be eaten, limits have been set this year on the number of females crabbers can catch.
FEATURES

By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
First in a three-part series on crabs. For Marylanders, crabs are more than a menu item. They're a way of life. Generations of Marylanders have relied on blue crabs, culled from the Chesapeake Bay, as sustenance and - in the case of watermen - for their livelihoods. Today, crabs are as much a social treat as they are a source of protein. The crab feast involves crabs, beer and lots of paper towels, and is a messy Maryland rite of passage. "Crabs are a Maryland tradition.
FEATURES

By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
First in a three-part series on crabs. For Marylanders, crabs are more than a menu item. They're a way of life. Generations of Marylanders have relied on blue crabs, culled from the Chesapeake Bay, as sustenance and - in the case of watermen - for their livelihoods. Today, crabs are as much a social treat as they are a source of protein. The crab feast involves crabs, beer and lots of paper towels, and is a messy Maryland rite of passage. "Crabs are a Maryland tradition.
NEWS
For The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2013
Third in a three-part series. There's no denying that soft-shell crabs are a little weird. They're slimy and slippery when raw. Cooked in a sandwich, their spindly legs and grabby claws poke out from the slices of bread and make some people wonder, "Do you seriously think I'm going to eat that?" And although even some lifelong crab-loving Marylanders believe soft-shell crabs to be a different species than the well-known blue crab, they are in fact the same creature. Soft crabs are simply blue crabs that have recently molted, shedding their hard shells to reveal a paper-thin exoskeleton that hardens within hours.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr | September 8, 1991
It took the Perry Hall Gators nearly three quarters to score their first touchdown against host Calvert Hall yesterday. But just when it looked like the Gators had climbed back into the game, the Cardinals pulled away.Yesterday's first meeting between the two schools was an example of how quickly momentum can change in a game. After the Gators' Wes Wedmore caught a 44-yard pass to the 1-yard line, setting up a Mike Stefanoni plunge into the end zone and bringing Perry to within a point of the lead, Calvert Hall's Tony Conrad returned the ensuing kickoff 90 yards for the game-breaking touchdown in Calvert Hall's 23-14 win."
SPORTS
By Marc Bouchard and Marc Bouchard,Contributing Writer | November 27, 1992
As if yesterday's 21-0 loss to Loyola wasn't troubling enough for Calvert Hall, there's more bad news: Loyola's Reggie Boyce is only a sophomore.Boyce, a 5-foot-10, 175-pound halfback, set the tone on the game's first play from scrimmage, taking a handoff and going 72 yards for a touchdown. George Perdikakis' extra point gave Loyola a 7-0 lead 44 seconds into the first quarter.Boyce finished with 132 yards on 12 carries. He also threw Loyola's only completed pass, an 8-yarder to quarterback Kevin Kaiser on a halfback option, and intercepted a Calvert Hall pass in the third quarter.
SPORTS
By Kevin Eck | September 16, 1991
Ward, Wrenn, Borland reach 100 victoriesOverlea's Terry Ward thought it might never happen. Roger Wrenn of Patterson was reflective. And Severna Park's Andy Borland, who apparently had done it before, downplayed it.Each coach had a different reaction to recording his 100th career victory over the weekend."
NEWS
February 21, 2007
You walk up to the display case, where you examine all sorts of fresh fish and seafood. You make your pick. You choose how you'd like it cooked - broiled, fried or grilled - and, perhaps, what kind of sauce you'd like with it. You choose two side dishes. Ten minutes later, your meal is delivered to you. Are you at one of Baltimore's finest seafood restaurants? You could be. But you could also be at Parkville's newest seafood place, Conrad's Crabs & Seafood Market. Obviously, not your usual seafood market.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
Buying crabs is a fairly straightforward proposition - if you know what you want. Below are a few tips about what to expect and what to look for when buying crabs: • Specify gender: Crab gender is easy to distinguish: male crabs (or "jimmies") have a narrow, T-shaped "apron" on the back of their shell, while female crabs ("sooks") have a wide apron. In addition, live females have red-tipped claws, while male claws are blue. While both can be eaten, limits have been set this year on the number of females crabbers can catch.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
Heading to a crab house for a feast is fun, but nothing beats an afternoon of crabs in the backyard. Here are some tips for planning a feast of your own: Dress the part: Crab feasts are a dirty business; expect to get messy. Jen Harris, an upstate New York native who moved to Baltimore in 2010, learned this the hard way at her first crab feast. "Do not wear a dry clean-only blouse with white jeans," she warns. "Wear clothing you don't care about. " Set the table: Long, outdoor tables are ideal for crab feasting, but any table covered in newspaper or brown paper will do. Set mallets, knives and rolls of paper towels within easy grabbing distance of pickers (experienced pickers will appreciate bowls of water for hand-rinsing, too)
SPORTS
By Kevin Eck | September 9, 1991
Comeback begins for Centennial kickerJust walking onto the field on Friday was a victory for Centennial's Brian Reid.Reid, the Eagles' kicker/punter, saw his season cut short last October by injuries he sustained in an automobile accident.He suffered intestinal damage and needed surgery to repair his ruptured spleen and a ruptured quadriceps in his right leg. Reid, who was hospitalized for 10 days and spent three days in Maryland Shock Trauma Center, also required plastic surgery to repair a gash above his right eye.Reid, who was a senior, fell behind in his schoolwork, and he opted to repeat his senior year.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Independence Day means steamed crabs for many Marylanders, but the outlook for celebrating the nation's birthday with a heaping tableful of locally caught crustaceans is as iffy as the weather of late. Despite a bumper crop of crabs tallied in the Chesapeake Bay during last winter's survey, that bounty has yet to show up at local docks or seafood outlets, watermen and dealers report. The big crab houses and restaurants always stock their coolers with crabs shipped up from Louisiana or Texas, and some seafood businesses have augmented the local catch with crabs trucked in from down the bay or North Carolina.
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