Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTony Awards
IN THE NEWS

Tony Awards

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 7, 2004
Hoping to attract a larger and more diverse audience, the 58th annual Tony Awards last night tried to go Hollywood. The result was a telecast that looked more like an uninspired 1960s television variety show than a spirited celebration of Broadway's best. CBS hoped that celebrity presenters like movie star Nicole Kidman and comedian Jimmy Fallon would boost ratings on a night when the telecast would be up against the season finale of The Sopranos and the National Basketball Association championship series.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
In an age when no cinematic product seems safe from being targeted for a theatrical make-over, and when so few of these movies-turned-musicals end up having much substance to offer, "Once" impresses all the more. This modest-scaled work, now getting its Baltimore debut at the Hippodrome, manages to preserve the essence of the hit indie film from 2007 written and directed by John Carney, while creating some unusual and genuine magic of its own. The screen version of "Once" introduced two engaging characters identified, in Everyman fashion, as Guy, a frustrated street musician in Dublin; and Girl, a Czech immigrant who happens upon him and finds herself riveted by his songs.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 5, 1995
"Sunset Boulevard," a $13 million musical extravaganza, and "Love! Valour! Compassion!" a $750,000 bargain play produced under a cost-cutting plan, took top honors at the 49th annual Tony Awards last night."Sunset Boulevard's" win was as predictable as the sunrise since it was the only full-fledged new musical to open on Broadway this season. The Andrew Lloyd Webber musical adaptation of Billy Wilder's classic 1950 movie won more Tonys than any other show -- seven, including one for leading lady Glenn Close's portrayal of silent movie diva Norma Desmond.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
A down-to-earth guy from a working-class city is determined to succeed in a tough business. Punching above his weight, he beats the odds and makes it into the ring, cheered on by a crowd that includes a woman who shares his modest roots and encourages his big dreams. That's not just the scenario of the wildly popular 1976 film "Rocky. " It also works as the art-imitating-art story line for the two Baltimore-area actors starring in the new musical version of "Rocky" that opens this week on Broadway.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2003
Hairspray put the final rhinestones in its tiara last night when it swept the 57th annual Tony Awards with eight of the little silver trophies, including the top prize, for Best Musical. A radiant Margo Lion, the show's Baltimore-born producer, shepherded choreographer Jerry Mitchell, filmmaker John Waters, a score of co-producers, the entire creative team and some of the cast onstage before accepting her trophy. "That's how many people it takes, and more, to make a musical. I'm not interested in standing up there by myself," she explained later.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | June 7, 2009
It's unlikely that you'll see the Lincoln Memorial when the 63rd annual Tony Awards are broadcast tonight. Chances are, the Supreme Court will be nowhere in sight. But Washington is nonetheless going to Broadway's annual celebration of live theater in a big way. Three shows that were born or took shape in the nation's capital are contending for little golden statuettes. Next to Normal, which is nominated for best musical, and 33 Variations, which is up for best play, both were shaped at Arena Stage.
FEATURES
By Jesse McKinley and Jesse McKinley,N.Y. TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 9, 2003
The piano perched on a platform above Duffy Square yesterday morning should have been the first sign that producers of this year's Tony Awards ceremony were serious about breaking their show's extended ratings slump. Billy Joel used the piano - a Kurzweil - to welcome audiences, live in Times Square and on television, to an entertainment-packed broadcast. Producers promised that this year's event - at Radio City Music Hall and broadcast on CBS - would be both an awards ceremony and an entertainment show.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 5, 2000
It wasn't just "another opening, another show" for "Kiss Me, Kate." The lavish revival won the largest number of prizes at last night's Tony Awards ceremony in New York. The Cole Porter musical, which is set at Baltimore's former Ford's Theatre during the out-of- town tryout of a musical version of "Taming of the Shrew," won five Tonys including best musical revival. The original production also won five Tony Awards in 1949. "Contact," a controversial musical with no original score or live music, was named best new musical.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 7, 1999
It was Miller time at last night's Tony Awards ceremony in New York as a 50-year-old play -- Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman" -- took home more awards than any other show."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 11, 2006
New York - Sixties' doo-wop, Roaring '20s syncopation, '80s disco and Great Depression blues. Song titles like "Big Girls Don't Cry" "Fancy Dress," "Saturday Night in the City" and "What About Love?" These musical styles and songs belong to the four shows competing for best new musical at tonight's Tony Awards ceremony (8-11 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13). The shows might not appear to have much in common: They take place in separate eras; they look and sound dissimilar; they have disparate plots; and their characters have different goals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
"The Book of Mormon" has to be the most subversive Broadway musical in history. All those other supposedly radical shows, the ones with nudity or such tough subjects as mental illness, just can't hold a candle to this insanely brilliant concoction about peppy, preachy young men from the Church of Latter-day Saints. The mucho-Tony-Award-grabbing "Mormon," now at the Kennedy Center and due to hit the Hippodrome next season, comes from the creative team of Trey Parker, Robert Lopez and Matt Stone, who also helped unleash "South Park" on an unsuspecting world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
We have all seen adults acting - to borrow a song lyric - more like children than children. But, if you're lucky, you've never met anyone quite like the people who spout, spar and spew in “God of Carnage,” the Tony Award-winning Yasmina Reza play currently getting an effective workout at Everyman Theatre. Meet the Novaks, Michael and Veronica, well-to-do parents of a boy who has lost some teeth and a whole lot of playground cred after being clobbered by the son of the likewise well-off Raleighs, Alan and Annette.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2012
In 2000, the British film "Billy Elliot" generated a flurry of admiration on both sides of the Atlantic. Something about this story of an 11-year-old boy, who decides to study ballet even as it makes him a major oddity in his northern England mining town, touched a nerve. Five years later, transformed into a musical with a score by Elton John, "Billy Elliot" became a runaway hit in London's West End. It went on to win a slew of Tony Awards, including Best Musical, after its 2008 Broadway premiere.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
Live Arts Maryland's season-closing production of "The Music Man" at Maryland Hall brought a pre-World War I small town to life with skilled musical direction and several memorable vocal performances. Music director J. Ernest Green led the Annapolis Chorale, Annapolis Chamber Orchestra and cast members in the April 29-30 weekend performances of the musical, set in 1912, which sees a traveling salesman/con man change his ways. Composer-lyricist Meredith Willson's musical tale won the 1958 Tony Award for best musical, somehow besting Leonard Bernstein's "West Side Story" that year to place Willson at the top of Broadway composers.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | June 7, 2009
It's unlikely that you'll see the Lincoln Memorial when the 63rd annual Tony Awards are broadcast tonight. Chances are, the Supreme Court will be nowhere in sight. But Washington is nonetheless going to Broadway's annual celebration of live theater in a big way. Three shows that were born or took shape in the nation's capital are contending for little golden statuettes. Next to Normal, which is nominated for best musical, and 33 Variations, which is up for best play, both were shaped at Arena Stage.
NEWS
By From Baltimore Sun news services | September 12, 2008
Rapper Kanye West arrested after dust-up with photographer at LAX Police say they have arrested Kanye West at Los Angeles International Airport on suspicion of vandalism after an altercation with a photographer. An airport spokesman says police also arrested West's bodyguard shortly before 8 a.m. yesterday. Airport spokesman Marshall Lowe says early reports are that West got into an altercation with a commercial photographer, and a camera valued at more than $10,000 was broken. The incident happened before West and his bodyguard, who was not identified, went into a security checkpoint at the airport.
NEWS
June 8, 1998
The last line of an article on the Tony Awards was inadvertently omitted in yesterday's Arts & Society section. The final paragraph should have read:Twenty years from now, when your neighborhood dinner theater, community theater or high school stages "Ragtime," it will still be a great musical. But when -- or if -- they stage "The Lion King," it will still be a cartoon.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 6/08/98
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | April 25, 2008
Opportunity knocked last night at the door of the Marquis Theatre, where Cry-Baby is making its Broadway debut. But nobody answered. Like Hairspray, this new musical is set in the Baltimore of John Waters' imagination. But Cry-Baby lacks the quirky lead characters who won its sassy sibling near-universal acclaim - not to mention the double fistfuls of Tony Awards. If you go Cry-Baby is playing at the Marquis Theatre, 1535 Broadway, New York, through Sept. 14. Tickets are $35-$250. Call 800-755-4000 or go to crybabyonbroadway.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | April 25, 2008
Opportunity knocked last night at the door of the Marquis Theatre, where Cry-Baby is making its Broadway debut. But nobody answered. Like Hairspray, this new musical is set in the Baltimore of John Waters' imagination. But Cry-Baby lacks the quirky lead characters who won its sassy sibling near-universal acclaim - not to mention the double fistfuls of Tony Awards. If you go Cry-Baby is playing at the Marquis Theatre, 1535 Broadway, New York, through Sept. 14. Tickets are $35-$250. Call 800-755-4000 or go to crybabyonbroadway.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | December 12, 2006
Here's a riddle: You need it to see, but "nobody notices it," says Christopher Akerlind. He is talking about light. Unlike everybody else, Akerlind, 44, notices it constantly. He feels "giddy" when the sun breaks over a building and throws a shadow precisely in the seam of a sidewalk. The Light in the Piazza Tuesday-Jan. 7 at the Kennedy Center, Washington. $25-$94. 800-444-1324 or kennedy-center.org
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.