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NEWS
June 26, 2003
On June 17, 2003, ANTHONY P. "TONY" SNOWDEN. A Memorial Service will be held on July 1, 2003, 6 P.M., at Christian Unity Temple, 3900 Groveland Ave.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Big-bucks movies -- "Sister Act," "Ghost," "Flashdance," "Dirty Dancing," to name a few -- get turned into stage musicals with some frequency. Indie films form a smaller screen-to-boards subset. Of these, "Once," based on the minuscule-budget, shot-in-17-days Irish film written and directed by John Carney, may be the most distinctive. With its eight Tony Awards in 2012, including best music, "Once" continues to win fans and strong reviews on the road. The national touring production, which arrives Tuesday to open the Hippodrome Theatre 's Broadway Across America season, launched a year ago and will keep traveling at least through next summer.
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FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | June 16, 2008
Lin-Manuel Miranda might have grown up In the Heights, but his current address is on top of the world. Last night, the theatrical love song that Miranda penned to his childhood stomping grounds of Washington Heights won the 2008 Tony Award for best new musical. Miranda first began to work on his tale of the close-knit Manhattan neighborhood in 1999, when he was a sophomore at Wesleyan University. When the top Tony was announced, he was hoisted atop the shoulders of the members of the cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
I have to admit I was not overjoyed at the thought of spending the Ravens' season opener with the fourth-string CBS broadcasting team of Spero Dedes and Solomon Wilcots. But I only wish now that the Ravens had done as well Sunday as Wilcots, Dedes and CBS Sports did. While the Ravens lost 23-16 to the Cincinnati Bengals thanks to too many mistakes to even keep track of, CBS Sports had a solid opener from its revamped pre-game show with Bart Scott and Tony Gonzalez to the game coverage from M&T Bank Stadium.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1997
From 1959 to 1963, a flat-out handsome, pinball-playing perfectionist named Jay Anthony Lukas brought front-page ideas to The Sun's back page -- home then for local news, home then for a future, two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist.Tony Lukas, so long gone from Baltimore, is freshly remembered today by a host of men and women of a certain age, of a certain time, who heard the news Saturday about their old friend and colleague.Lukas, 64, committed suicide in his Manhattan apartment Friday.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 2, 1997
The musical "Titanic" sailed smoothly to victory at last night's Tony Awards ceremony in New York.In addition to being named best musical, the 42-character epic won every award for which it was nominated -- a clean sweep for the costliest show of the Broadway season (though its $10 million budget is dwarfed by that of the coming film on the same subject, reported at $200 million).In an evening filled with close races, the hit revival of John Kander and Fred Ebb's 1975 musical, "Chicago," proved true to the prediction that it was one of the few sure things, winning more Tonys than any other show.
FEATURES
By From Ladies' Home Journal Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 5, 1995
"Now that Tony has everything he ever wanted -- a well-paying job at the bank, a whole new set of fancy friends -- he doesn't need or love me anymore," says Carla, a slightly overweight woman of 33 who works in the records department of large hospital."I know he's furious at me for not going to his company party, but I just couldn't. I feel so out of place with those people."Carla can't help wishing they were poor again."Back then, it was Tony and me against the world," she says wistfully.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Back from Tribal Council, Tony is feeling secure, so he's spouting off about people being “worthy” and being “allowed” to stay there. He keeps asking Spencer why it's a compliment that everybody voted for him, and why he's being targeted. Because you're constantly strategizing, you've set yourself up as a leader and you're more than a little bit crazy. Trish and LJ agree with me, because they're talking about whether or not Tony is going to go off the deep end. And sure enough, he can't stop talking about the fact that people are voting for him. He's a self-fulfilling prophecy: he's going to be so paranoid and obsessive that he's going to alienate people in his alliance, and they're going to vote him off, which is what he was paranoid about in the first place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | October 11, 2007
Tony Della Rose, proprietor of the new Della Rose's at Canton Crossing, likes to tell the Della Rose history. The story goes like this: While Tony's dad, Joseph, was working as a machinist in World War II, he sent money home to his father and told him to buy a business that Joseph could run when he returned. -- Poor:]
ENTERTAINMENT
Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
It's Night 25 and things have pretty much gone all to hell at Solarrion. Tony admits that he flipped on LJ, and the rest of his alliance wants to know why. Trish isn't mad, because it wasn't her this time. Why do these people keep trusting him? Haven't they learned that he will vote anyone out? Hopefully tonight is the night the rest of them figure that out. Morning of Day 25, and Tony is running around like a crazy person (go figure) and making himself a spy shack. Sigh. He's insane, but he's totally right, because he totally spies on Jefra and Trish talking about him. Jefra admits that she doesn't trust him (as she shouldn't)
FEATURES
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
"LOOSE SEAL!!" If you find yourself walking around with a couple hundred "Arrested Development" catchphrases in your head but no one to shout them at, here's your big chance. Actor Tony Hale, who played the reality challenged youngest Bluth son, Buster, will be making two appearances later this month in Baltimore to promote his children's book, "Archibald's Next Big Thing. "   The first event, An Evening with Tony Hale, will be held at the Calvert School on North Charles Street.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Professional baseball great Tony Gwynn Sr., also known as Mr. Padre, died last month of salivary gland cancer, which he believed was caused by years of using smokeless chewing tobacco. The cancer is a rare form that begins in any of the salivary glands in the mouth, neck or throat. Two adults in 100,000 are diagnosed with salivary gland cancer each year. The chances of survival drop if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. Dr. Patrick K. Ha, with Johns Hopkins Head and Neck Surgery at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, says new types of treatments and therapies are in the works to treat the disease.
NEWS
June 23, 2014
The death one week ago of baseball's Tony Gwynn, who is often remembered by Baltimoreans for his induction in the Hall of Fame in 2007 with Cal Ripken Jr. , called attention to the dangers of smokeless tobacco. The former San Diego Padres batting champ suffered from oral cancer and blamed two decades of chewing tobacco for his plight. As well-publicized as the health risks of tobacco may be in the U.S., the focus has been placed primarily on the dangers of cigarette smoking. That's understandable given the cigarettes are by far the most popular tobacco product.
NEWS
June 18, 2014
As a fan of both baseball and all around good guys, I was saddened to hear about the premature death of Tony Gwynn at 54 ( "What a sad day as Tony Gwynn leaves us too soon," June 16). Tony was one of the very best of his era, a batting champion many times, multiple All Star Team member, and an inductee into the baseball Hall of Fame along with the Orioles' own Cal Ripken. Many words were spoken about this outstanding figure from the world of sports, but very few were devoted to how was it that such a superb athlete came to such an early end. He died of cancer brought about by the use of the most deadly substance legally available in our society - tobacco.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Other than that sweet swing and the 3,141 hits, the thing that stood out the most about Tony Gwynn was the 1000-watt smile that shined on everyone he met and seemed to be right for every occasion. If Gwynn, who died from cancer Monday at age 54, appeared to be the world's nicest human whenever he showed up on ESPN's SportsCenter or at some local charity event, then there really is truth in advertising because he was the real deal both on the field and off it. Of course, he was one of the greatest all-time hitters and, if you needed a testimonial to that, you could have asked Ted Williams before he died in 2002. He was a big fan of Gwynn's, as was Cal Ripken Jr., whose heartfelt statement Monday simply confirmed what anybody who ever met Gwynn already knew.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.  - While growing up in San Diego, Orioles center fielder Adam Jones idolized Tony Gwynn as a player, then later gained greater admiration for him after getting to know the Padres Hall of Famer as a person. So the news of Gwynn's death Monday at age 54, after a four-year battle with cancer, hit Jones especially hard. "I've known the man for most of my adult life, so it's tough when someone passes like that, especially the impact he'd had on not just myself, but on countless major leaguers, and just people in general, in the San Diego community," Jones said.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Cal Ripken Jr. and Tony Gwynn always will be linked by a splendid Sunday in July 2007, when baseball fans massed to celebrate all that was still good in the game. The pair went into the Hall of Fame together - Gwynn, the voluble hitting wizard, and Ripken, the indestructible shortstop. They seemed to admire each other as much as the crowd appreciated them both. So Ripken reacted with sadness Monday when news emerged that Gwynn had died at age 54 after an extended battle with cancer . “This is an extraordinarily sad day,” Ripken said in a statement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Toni L. Killefer, a former preschool teacher who mentored cancer patients and participated in breast cancer research, died Monday of metastatic breast cancer at her Stevenson home. She was 49. "I took care of Toni for a number of years, and she had her eyes wide open on this. She always knew what she was up against and she was very straightforward," said Dr. John H. Fetting III, a Johns Hopkins Hospital oncologist. "All she wanted to be was a mom and look out for her children with as little fuss about her illness, and just be able to manage.
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