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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | September 15, 1992
Nothing seemed to cure Eric Hymel's breathing troubles. The little boy, now 3 1/2 years old, was always congested, spoke unclearly and ate little.After numerous antibiotic and asthma treatments proved ineffective, his mother Beth Hymel decided to take her son to Dr. John Ruth, an otolaryngologist -- ear, nose and throat doctor -- at Union Memorial Hospital. Dr. Ruth, who is also a head and neck surgeon, found that Eric's adenoids were very large and appeared to be blocking his sinuses.His tonsils, as well, were unusually large.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | September 16, 2008
The Ravens expect Troy Smith to play again this season after clearing the second-year quarterback to start light conditioning work yesterday. The 2006 Heisman Trophy winner has not practiced with the team since coming down with severe tonsillitis Aug. 22. He has lost 20 pounds while also battling a blood clot in his neck, which led to an infection in his lung. There is no timetable for his return to the field. "This is extraordinarily unlucky," said Dr. Andrew Tucker, the Ravens' head physician.
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SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
CHICAGO -- There is a tendency among ballplayers, Orioles catcher Gregg Zaun said, to believe that the use of chewing tobacco and dip won't ever hurt them.Even after Los Angeles Dodgers center fielder Brett Butler was found to have cancer of the tonsils Tuesday, Zaun said, "Everybody thinks, 'that'll never happen to me.' I'll be the first to admit that."Zaun, however, is worried. "Scared," he said.He's trying to break a habit that started 10 years ago, something he compares to a drug addiction -- except that he can satisfy his craving by driving down to the local gas station.
FEATURES
By HOLLY SELBY | January 24, 2008
Late winter is high season for scratchy, itchy or sore throats, and most of us know how miserable having one can be. But how do we know when a sore throat is simply part of a common cold and when it is a symptom of the potentially more serious strep throat? It's wise to take note of your symptoms, says Alan Oshinksy, otolaryngologist-in-chief at Northwest Hospital Center and Sinai Hospital. Strep throat, left untreated, can not only be painful but can also lead to a more serious condition.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | August 9, 1993
LEONARDTOWN -- The judge calls the next case, and instantly the St. Mary's County District Court room is filled with The Voice, the baritone drawl that for much of this century has pulsed through the soundtrack of Southern Maryland."
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN and JUDY FOREMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 2005
What causes bad breath, and how can I get rid of it? Bad breath (halitosis) is often caused by bacteria in the mouth or upper airway that produce sulfur-containing compounds. Usually, it can be banished by flossing and brushing teeth twice a day and brushing and scraping the tongue. If bacteria are also lurking in deep "pockets" in the gums, a dental professional must scrape them out. But even with excellent oral hygiene, some people need more drastic approaches. About 90 percent of bad breath is caused by bacteria in the mouth itself, and a only small percentage is caused by bacteria in the tonsils, said Dr. Richard Price, a retired dentist and a spokesman for the American Dental Association.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Sun Columnist | January 5, 2007
Should I consider bariatric surgery to control Type 2 diabetes? Yes, if you are significantly obese and have tried and failed to lose weight through diet and exercise. Obesity is a major contributor to Type 2 diabetes, in which the hormone insulin becomes less effective at its job, escorting sugar into cells; weight loss is the best way to control diabetes. For people who can't lose enough weight through diet and exercise, bariatric surgery is an increasingly popular option; the number of such surgeries has quadrupled since 2000, reaching 177,600 this year, according to the American Society for Bariatric Surgery.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | May 12, 2006
The only real health problem that 3-year-old Nicholas Salter had was the occasional sore throat. Sometimes, it hurt so much that it was hard to swallow, which cut back on his appetite. And there was one more issue: "He'd snore so loudly you could hear him in his room from the top of the steps," said his mother, Jackie Salter. After two cases of strep throat within a few weeks, doctors recommended a sleep study: hooking Nicholas up to monitors overnight to make sure he was breathing properly and getting enough rest.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | June 7, 1994
Everyone worries about bad breath. No one wants to repel a loved one or a colleague. How many times have you passed up the onions on a tasty sandwich for fear of offending?Advertisers exploit these anxieties to create concern about "morning breath" or "dragon mouth." As a consequence, Americans spend millions on mouthwash and breath mints. Most of that money is wasted.Everyone wakes up with a stale taste in the mouth. It's the result of bacteria building up overnight due to oral inactivity.
NEWS
By CINDY PARR | November 9, 1992
Go take a hike! That's what Betty and Bob Fowler of Westminster did for 10 days in October when they covered 106 miles of the Appalachian Trail.The Fowlers, who love to walk and keep in shape by mall walking and playing golf, have covered the trail in Maryland and hope to hike the entire Maine-to-Georgia path.They would like to camp the trail someday. Now they're day walkers, returning to a motel or even home after a day on foot. "Your feet are just about dead after 10 miles of walking, and a hot tub at night is great," Mr. Fowler said.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Sun Columnist | January 5, 2007
Should I consider bariatric surgery to control Type 2 diabetes? Yes, if you are significantly obese and have tried and failed to lose weight through diet and exercise. Obesity is a major contributor to Type 2 diabetes, in which the hormone insulin becomes less effective at its job, escorting sugar into cells; weight loss is the best way to control diabetes. For people who can't lose enough weight through diet and exercise, bariatric surgery is an increasingly popular option; the number of such surgeries has quadrupled since 2000, reaching 177,600 this year, according to the American Society for Bariatric Surgery.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | May 12, 2006
The only real health problem that 3-year-old Nicholas Salter had was the occasional sore throat. Sometimes, it hurt so much that it was hard to swallow, which cut back on his appetite. And there was one more issue: "He'd snore so loudly you could hear him in his room from the top of the steps," said his mother, Jackie Salter. After two cases of strep throat within a few weeks, doctors recommended a sleep study: hooking Nicholas up to monitors overnight to make sure he was breathing properly and getting enough rest.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN and JUDY FOREMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 2005
What causes bad breath, and how can I get rid of it? Bad breath (halitosis) is often caused by bacteria in the mouth or upper airway that produce sulfur-containing compounds. Usually, it can be banished by flossing and brushing teeth twice a day and brushing and scraping the tongue. If bacteria are also lurking in deep "pockets" in the gums, a dental professional must scrape them out. But even with excellent oral hygiene, some people need more drastic approaches. About 90 percent of bad breath is caused by bacteria in the mouth itself, and a only small percentage is caused by bacteria in the tonsils, said Dr. Richard Price, a retired dentist and a spokesman for the American Dental Association.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
CHICAGO -- There is a tendency among ballplayers, Orioles catcher Gregg Zaun said, to believe that the use of chewing tobacco and dip won't ever hurt them.Even after Los Angeles Dodgers center fielder Brett Butler was found to have cancer of the tonsils Tuesday, Zaun said, "Everybody thinks, 'that'll never happen to me.' I'll be the first to admit that."Zaun, however, is worried. "Scared," he said.He's trying to break a habit that started 10 years ago, something he compares to a drug addiction -- except that he can satisfy his craving by driving down to the local gas station.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | June 7, 1994
Everyone worries about bad breath. No one wants to repel a loved one or a colleague. How many times have you passed up the onions on a tasty sandwich for fear of offending?Advertisers exploit these anxieties to create concern about "morning breath" or "dragon mouth." As a consequence, Americans spend millions on mouthwash and breath mints. Most of that money is wasted.Everyone wakes up with a stale taste in the mouth. It's the result of bacteria building up overnight due to oral inactivity.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | August 9, 1993
LEONARDTOWN -- The judge calls the next case, and instantly the St. Mary's County District Court room is filled with The Voice, the baritone drawl that for much of this century has pulsed through the soundtrack of Southern Maryland."
FEATURES
By HOLLY SELBY | January 24, 2008
Late winter is high season for scratchy, itchy or sore throats, and most of us know how miserable having one can be. But how do we know when a sore throat is simply part of a common cold and when it is a symptom of the potentially more serious strep throat? It's wise to take note of your symptoms, says Alan Oshinksy, otolaryngologist-in-chief at Northwest Hospital Center and Sinai Hospital. Strep throat, left untreated, can not only be painful but can also lead to a more serious condition.
SPORTS
By Special to The Sun | November 30, 1991
MINNEAPOLIS -- Considering what she has been through recently, Anita Nall was pleased with her time and non-winning showing yesterday in her first race at the U.S. Open Swimming Championships.Nall, 15, a Towson High School sophomore who swims for the North Baltimore Aquatics Club, was fourth in the 100-meter breast stroke in a time of 1 minute, 11.29 seconds. The winner was Australian Samantha Riley, 19, who finished in 1:10.56."I just had my tonsils out a couple of weeks ago, so I hadn't been in total training," Nall said.
NEWS
By CINDY PARR | November 9, 1992
Go take a hike! That's what Betty and Bob Fowler of Westminster did for 10 days in October when they covered 106 miles of the Appalachian Trail.The Fowlers, who love to walk and keep in shape by mall walking and playing golf, have covered the trail in Maryland and hope to hike the entire Maine-to-Georgia path.They would like to camp the trail someday. Now they're day walkers, returning to a motel or even home after a day on foot. "Your feet are just about dead after 10 miles of walking, and a hot tub at night is great," Mr. Fowler said.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | September 15, 1992
Nothing seemed to cure Eric Hymel's breathing troubles. The little boy, now 3 1/2 years old, was always congested, spoke unclearly and ate little.After numerous antibiotic and asthma treatments proved ineffective, his mother Beth Hymel decided to take her son to Dr. John Ruth, an otolaryngologist -- ear, nose and throat doctor -- at Union Memorial Hospital. Dr. Ruth, who is also a head and neck surgeon, found that Eric's adenoids were very large and appeared to be blocking his sinuses.His tonsils, as well, were unusually large.
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