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Tons Of Fly

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NEWS
By John A. Morris and Robert E. Lee and John A. Morris and Robert E. Lee,Staff writers | November 23, 1990
As Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. prepares to bring a fourth Pasadena coal-burning power plant on-line, the utility is wrestling with how to dispose of the thousands of tons of fly ash generated each year.Monika S. Bay, BG & E supervisor for land use management, said the utility hopes to convert up to 60 percent of the 470,000 tons of fly ash -- a non-hazardous by-product -- produced by the four coal-fired generators into "coarse aggregate," a pebble-like material used in concrete.Bay said the utility would contract another firm to build, operate and maintain the aggregate manufacturing plant at the utility's Brandon Shores facility.
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NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | September 12, 2007
Anne Arundel County Council members expressed frustration yesterday that they know little about negotiations between the state's environmental agency and the operator of a fly-ash dump site to clean up contaminated water in Gambrills. Without updates from either the Maryland Department of the Environment or the dump operator, BBSS Inc., the council members said it's difficult for them to make an informed decision on a bill to ban the further dumping of coal ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants.
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BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2000
At its three Maryland coal-fired power plants, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. burns about 6 million tons of coal a year. The result: about 600,000 tons of a gray powdery substance called fly ash -- and a bill every year to get rid of it. But now BGE, as well as other utilities around the country, are looking for a modern version of the alchemist's quest -- turning ashes into gold. Historically, utilities paid companies to take fly ash off their hands, or they dumped it in landfills. Now, with deregulation on the horizon for many states, including Maryland in July, utilities are more interested in generating revenue from the waste product.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2000
At its three Maryland coal-fired power plants, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. burns about 6 million tons of coal a year. The result: about 600,000 tons of a gray powdery substance called fly ash -- and a bill every year to get rid of it. But now BGE, as well as other utilities around the country, are looking for a modern version of the alchemist's quest -- turning ashes into gold. Historically, utilities paid companies to take fly ash off their hands, or they dumped it in landfills. Now, with deregulation on the horizon for many states, including Maryland in July, utilities are more interested in generating revenue from the waste product.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1998
Baltimore Gas and Electric is appealing a month-old order by the Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals requiring the utility to install a leak-blocking $10 million clay liner at the bottom of its Solley area fly ash disposal site.The board issued the order after months of hearings in which residents questioned the utility using 1.6 million tons of fly ash as structural fill in a new section of Brandon Woods Business Park on Solley Road.Peggy Mulloy, a BGE spokeswoman, said the utility filed the appeal in county Circuit Court Thursday.
NEWS
February 25, 1998
BALTIMORE GAS and Electric Co. won approval to begin filling another landfill at Brandon Woods Energy Business Park with fly ash, the byproduct of burning coal. But the electric utility doesn't like the conditions that accompanied the permit.The Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals ruled that BGE must install a clay liner at a cost of about $10 million. BGE is challenging that ruling in Circuit Court.During the past 16 years, BGE has dumped several million tons of fly ash produced by its massive Brandon Shores power plant in northern Anne Arundel's Solley area in two nearby landfills.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1998
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. asked an Anne Arundel judge yesterday to throw out an order requiring the utility to spend $10 million to prevent fly ash from contaminating ground water in the Solley community.The hearing before District Judge Ronald A. Silkworth was the latest step in the long-running battle by Solley residents to stop the utility giant from using millions of tons of fly ash -- a byproduct of burning coal for electricity -- as fill under its Brandon Woods Business Park.The residents also claim that fly ash is a potential respiratory hazard.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | March 30, 1997
PERSISTENCE is Carl Hackmann's most obvious characteristic.Mr. Hackmann is leading the charge against the third increment of BGE's fly ash disposal plan at Brandon Woods Energy Business Park.The Riviera Beach resident represents the Coalition of Communities and Citizens Against Fly Ash, a collection of people who live or have lived along Solley Road near BGE's large Brandon Shores power plant in northern Anne Arundel County.To the chagrin of BGE executives, the Riviera Beach resident is a skeptic and a relentless fighter.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1998
Anne Arundel County residents who live near a Baltimore Gas and Electric fly ash disposal site are incensed by what they see as a years-long deception by the utility and a federal agency about the existence of a seamless protective layer of clay under the site.Almost 17 years into their battle against BGE, residents of northern Anne Arundel's Solley community learned months ago about breaks in what they thought was a continuous layer between the ash and underground water.The utility and officials of the Army Corps of Engineers deny any wrongdoing.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1998
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. must install a $10 million clay liner under its fly ash disposal site in the Solley area to prevent polluting leaks, the Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals has ordered.The board issued the costly verdict to BGE last week after months of hearings in which Solley residents challenged the utility's use of 1.6 million tons of fly ash as filler in a new section of the Brandon Woods Industrial Park.Two other sections of the park have been filled in with fly ash but do not have clay liners.
NEWS
July 25, 1999
Fly ash problem in Solley is hardly settledThe editorial, "Burying the fly ash debate" (July 16), unfortunately sounded more like Baltimore Gas and Electric Co's public-relations spin than balanced, well-researched journalism.Had the writer attended any one of the 17 hearings before three different judicial bodies or contacted one of the numerous experts, lawyers, governmental agency representatives or participants for the community, he might have been better prepared to make a judgment.1)
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
After nearly 20 years of battling a powerful utility -- and gaining a major victory -- some activists might have celebrated loudly, then returned to the normal business of life.Not the residents of the Solley community in northern Anne Arundel County.Although the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. recently announced an end to its policy of using fly ash as fill in Brandon Woods Business Park, area residents aren't ready to celebrate yet.They vow to keep pressing the utility giant on environmental and safety issues related to fly ash -- the gray dust and chunks that are a byproduct of burning coal at BGE's Brandon Shores and H. A. Wagner electricity-generating plants.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1998
An Anne Arundel County judge denied Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s appeal yesterday of an order requiring the utility to spend $10 million on a clay liner to prevent fly ash from contaminating ground water on the Marley Neck peninsula.Circuit Judge Ronald A. Silkworth upheld a January decision by the county Board of Appeals that required BGE to install the liner under about 150 acres of the Brandon Woods Business Park in Solley, where the company is placing more than 1.5 million tons of fly ash.The board made the requirement after 15 hearings from March to October 1997, during which residents asked the board to rescind the county permit allowing the utility to use fly ash as structural fill on the site.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1998
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. asked an Anne Arundel judge yesterday to throw out an order requiring the utility to spend $10 million to prevent fly ash from contaminating ground water in the Solley community.The hearing before District Judge Ronald A. Silkworth was the latest step in the long-running battle by Solley residents to stop the utility giant from using millions of tons of fly ash -- a byproduct of burning coal for electricity -- as fill under its Brandon Woods Business Park.The residents also claim that fly ash is a potential respiratory hazard.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1998
Federal and state environmental agencies are looking into whether to require air quality controls for a fly ash disposal site in North Anne Arundel County after a meeting yesterday in which nearby residents asked the officials for an air-monitoring station.The residents, many of them members of the Coalition of Communities and Citizens Against Fly Ash (CCCAF), fear that fly ash particles in the air could cause respiratory problems.Representatives from the federal Environmental Protection Agency and the Maryland Department of the Environment met in South Baltimore with a local Sierra Club leader, Solley community residents and two air experts who backed the residents' request.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1998
More than 20 state and federal representatives met with Solley residents Friday to hear their complaints about a fly ash disposal site in what community leaders hailed as a significant first effort to include them in decision-making about environmental issues.For almost 3 1/2 hours, experts brought in by the residents discussed their studies, which show that Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. disposal site on Solley Road has contaminated the ++ air with particles of fly ash and could taint well water, too.State and federal officials refuted some assertions and conceded others, concluding that they need to study whether more permits regulating air quality and fly ash placement at the ++ site are needed.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1998
Anne Arundel County residents who live near a Baltimore Gas and Electric fly ash disposal site are incensed by what they see as a years-long deception by the utility and a federal agency about the existence of a seamless protective layer of clay under the site.Almost 17 years into their battle against BGE, residents of northern Anne Arundel's Solley community learned months ago about breaks in what they thought was a continuous layer between the ash and underground water.The utility and officials of the Army Corps of Engineers deny any wrongdoing.
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