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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 13, 1992
Right now, the big debate among country critics is over which way the music ought to be heading. Some say the recent infusion of pop and rock influences has made the music more dynamic than it has been in years, while others argue that a song isn't really country unless it has that traditional honky-tonk twang.Collin Raye sees it a different way, however. As far as he can see, what's really happening right now is that today's country fans aren't afraid to listen to other kinds of music."A great example was when we were in Lewisville, Texas, working in a straight honky-tonk," he says over the phone while waiting for a flight out of Reno, Nev. "Every guy there had a Copenhagen [snuff]
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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Compared with a country music mecca like Nashville, Baltimore's country scene might seem almost nonexistent. But for local honky-tonk singer/songwriter Arty Hill, that's not necessarily a bad thing. "In Nashville, you're working in the shadow of modern country music - which is pop music - and it's a big shadow to be working in," Hill said. "Here, there are no boundaries. We can do whatever we want. I get to do honky-tonk at Rams Head Live. That's pretty awesome when you think about it. There's nobody in Baltimore shoving Toby Keith down people's throats."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Compared with a country music mecca like Nashville, Baltimore's country scene might seem almost nonexistent. But for local honky-tonk singer/songwriter Arty Hill, that's not necessarily a bad thing. "In Nashville, you're working in the shadow of modern country music - which is pop music - and it's a big shadow to be working in," Hill said. "Here, there are no boundaries. We can do whatever we want. I get to do honky-tonk at Rams Head Live. That's pretty awesome when you think about it. There's nobody in Baltimore shoving Toby Keith down people's throats."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 5, 2004
Top 40 Singles 1. OutKast, "Hey Ya!" 2. OutKast, "The Way You Move" 3. Nickelback, "Someday" 4. Baby Bash, "Suga Suga" 5. No Doubt, "It's My Life" Urban Singles 1. Twista featuring Kanye West and Jamie Foxx, "Slow Jamz" 2. Alicia Keys, "You Don't Know My Name" 3. Beyonce, "Me, Myself And I" 4. Kanye West, "Through the Wire" 5. Ruben Studdard, "Sorry 2004" Country Singles 1. Alan Jackson, "Remember When" 2. Kenny Chesney, "There Goes My...
NEWS
November 21, 1996
Lila Shanley, 86, a pioneering Hollywood stuntwoman who performed swimming and diving feats for Dorothy Lamour in the 1937 film "The Hurricane," died Friday in Santa Monica.She worked in motion pictures for almost six decades and appeared in more than 100 films under her professional name, Lila Finn. She was also the stunt double for Vivien Leigh in "Gone With the Wind," for Paulette Goddard in "Unconquered" and for Donna Reed in "It's a Wonderful Life."Bill Doggett, 80, a rhythm-and-blues musician who scored a 1956 hit with "Honky Tonk," died Nov. 13 in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 5, 2004
Top 40 Singles 1. OutKast, "Hey Ya!" 2. OutKast, "The Way You Move" 3. Nickelback, "Someday" 4. Baby Bash, "Suga Suga" 5. No Doubt, "It's My Life" Urban Singles 1. Twista featuring Kanye West and Jamie Foxx, "Slow Jamz" 2. Alicia Keys, "You Don't Know My Name" 3. Beyonce, "Me, Myself And I" 4. Kanye West, "Through the Wire" 5. Ruben Studdard, "Sorry 2004" Country Singles 1. Alan Jackson, "Remember When" 2. Kenny Chesney, "There Goes My...
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | January 2, 1997
MichaelMusic from the Motion Picture (Warner Bros. 24666)According to Kitty Wells, it wasn't God who made honky-tonk angels. But if Nora Ephron is to be believed, he did make honky-tonk-loving angels. Why else would the soundtrack to Ephron's angel flick, "Michael," be so full of honky-tonk music? Granted, it isn't pure country fare. Although Willie Nelson's "What a Wonderful World," the Mavericks' energetic "I Don't Care If You Love Me Anymore" and even Andie MacDowell's surprisingly smooth "Sittin' By the Side of the Road" are all honky-tonk in the Nashville sense of the term, there's a similar roadhouse spirit to Bonnie Raitt's soulful "Feels Like Home" and Kenny Wayne Shepherd's bluesy run through "The Spider and the Fly."
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | November 15, 1990
When the new managers of the Fishmarket examined their prospects for success at the Inner Harbor entertainment complex, they identified several "major obstacles" that led to the previous operation's demise last year.Among them were the high price of admission, the cost of parking and the lack of available activities.The managers -- who include Texas businessmen and nightclub operators Billy Bob Barnett and Spencer Taylor along with local caterer Martin Resnick -- believe they have found a solution to the problems, according to sources familiar with their plans for the $25 million facility.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | January 4, 2004
I HAVE DISCOVERED the perfect sport. You don't have to be in great shape to play it. You barely have to stand. You're thinking: golf. Wrong. Compared with the sport I'm talking about, golf is brutal, sometimes forcing you to physically walk 15 feet from your cart to your ball. Whereas the sport I'm talking about involves almost no walking, and little movement of any kind, except for signaling the bartender. The most strenuous part of this sport is pronouncing its name: petanque. It's a French word, roughly pronounced "pay-TONK," but you have to get really nasal on the "TONK."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 28, 1996
There's no denying that Marcus Hummon's April residency tour is a good gimmick. For four weeks, the Nashville-based singer will be spending Mondays in Boston, Tuesdays in Philadelphia, Wednesdays in Baltimore and Thursdays in Pittsburgh, and though he won't be covering as much ground as he would on a traditional road trip, he'll surely get a lot of mileage off the novelty of the tour.But what Hummon liked about the concept wasn't its P.R. potential, but its familiar feel. Because playing the same clubs on a regular basis was how this singer/songwriter came up in the country music community.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | January 4, 2004
I HAVE DISCOVERED the perfect sport. You don't have to be in great shape to play it. You barely have to stand. You're thinking: golf. Wrong. Compared with the sport I'm talking about, golf is brutal, sometimes forcing you to physically walk 15 feet from your cart to your ball. Whereas the sport I'm talking about involves almost no walking, and little movement of any kind, except for signaling the bartender. The most strenuous part of this sport is pronouncing its name: petanque. It's a French word, roughly pronounced "pay-TONK," but you have to get really nasal on the "TONK."
FEATURES
By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 2001
In the days before he became Kid Rock, little Bob Ritchie used to stand in front of a mirror pretending he was Michael Jackson in sequins and a white glove, working out his dance routine to "Beat It." "Everybody has their little corny stage, and that was mine," Rock says with a laugh. "Now I realize what really got me was that beat, and it was an 808 drum machine - the most prominent instrument in rap music during the '80s. It was on everything from the Beastie Boys' Licensed to Ill, the Run-D.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 3, 2000
Miles Davis On the Corner (Columbia/Legacy 63980) Get Up With It (Columbia/Legacy 63970) One week in 1970, Miles Davis' "Bitches Brew" climbed to No. 38 on the Billboard albums chart, making it the most successful title of Davis' career. The album was an astonishing achievement. Commercially, "Bitches Brew" put Davis back on the map after a decade in which his angular, intellectualized approach to jazz was thought to have lost ground to the politically progressive black nationalism of John Coltrane and his disciples.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1999
Ruth Logsdon traces her honky-tonk roots to an evening in front of the television. Growing up in Bethesda, her suburban experience didn't include evenings in truck stops, cowboys and livestock or going to dances in boots. But there was Loretta Lynn on the Country Music Awards. "I can remember my Dad saying she could really sing," said Logsdon, vocalist who is Ruthie in the Washington-based band Ruthie and the Wranglers. "I remember watching `Hee Haw' and thinking that stuff was so square.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | January 2, 1997
MichaelMusic from the Motion Picture (Warner Bros. 24666)According to Kitty Wells, it wasn't God who made honky-tonk angels. But if Nora Ephron is to be believed, he did make honky-tonk-loving angels. Why else would the soundtrack to Ephron's angel flick, "Michael," be so full of honky-tonk music? Granted, it isn't pure country fare. Although Willie Nelson's "What a Wonderful World," the Mavericks' energetic "I Don't Care If You Love Me Anymore" and even Andie MacDowell's surprisingly smooth "Sittin' By the Side of the Road" are all honky-tonk in the Nashville sense of the term, there's a similar roadhouse spirit to Bonnie Raitt's soulful "Feels Like Home" and Kenny Wayne Shepherd's bluesy run through "The Spider and the Fly."
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1996
CHICAGO -- Oh, mama, look what they've done to the blues.You remember the blues, don't you? Sweet, sad music about lost love and flawed souls and sittin' on the dock of the bay, preferably played in smoky, dingy, dangerous joints where the only phone number you need is scrawled on the bathroom wall.Those days are gone. They end at 8: 30 p.m. Saturday in an explosion of fireworks from a barge on the Chicago River. They end when 1,500 media people and assorted guests witness the opening of a $20-plus million, 55,000-square-foot dance hall that looks like a combination of Tara, a Prague opera house and the Best Little Whorehouse in Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 3, 2000
Miles Davis On the Corner (Columbia/Legacy 63980) Get Up With It (Columbia/Legacy 63970) One week in 1970, Miles Davis' "Bitches Brew" climbed to No. 38 on the Billboard albums chart, making it the most successful title of Davis' career. The album was an astonishing achievement. Commercially, "Bitches Brew" put Davis back on the map after a decade in which his angular, intellectualized approach to jazz was thought to have lost ground to the politically progressive black nationalism of John Coltrane and his disciples.
NEWS
November 21, 1996
Lila Shanley, 86, a pioneering Hollywood stuntwoman who performed swimming and diving feats for Dorothy Lamour in the 1937 film "The Hurricane," died Friday in Santa Monica.She worked in motion pictures for almost six decades and appeared in more than 100 films under her professional name, Lila Finn. She was also the stunt double for Vivien Leigh in "Gone With the Wind," for Paulette Goddard in "Unconquered" and for Donna Reed in "It's a Wonderful Life."Bill Doggett, 80, a rhythm-and-blues musician who scored a 1956 hit with "Honky Tonk," died Nov. 13 in New York.
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