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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 20, 1992
GIANT TINKERTOYS are the chief design motif in the production of "Bye Bye Birdie" that opened at the Lyric Opera House last night. And no doubt about it, this is Tinkertoy level material.That is to say, it's downright silly -- a relic that harks back to the good old days when musicals were still called "musical comedies." What makes this touring production fun is that it glorifies in its own silliness. From the Tinkertoy sets to the crayon-colored costumes, it doesn't pretend to be anything other than a teeny-bopping hop down memory lane.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | February 11, 2008
So the charming, the unique, the indestructible Cher is coming back! The Oscar-winning Cher, at 61, has had career success and longevity like few others. Remember this: She is the only artist to have a hit song in each of the past four decades. And as she preps to make a super splash at Caesars Palace in the Celine Dion venue, she is working on her 27th studio album. She told Nightline's Cynthia McFadden that her regrets are the things she didn't do -- like taking up Elvis Presley and Marlon Brando when they made a pass.
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By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | May 31, 2007
ON JUNE 3, the Transport Group's fourth annual "Evening With" series -- at New York's Soho Playhouse -- features a conversation with Broadway's tallest drink of water -- dancer, singer, actor, choreographer, director, producer -- Tommy Tune. The nine-time Tony winner will talk about the career that began in Wichita Falls, Texas, and marched onto The Great White Way with Nine, Grand Hotel, The Will Rogers Follies, A Day In Hollywood/A Night In the Ukraine and My One and Only. And I wonder when MGM is going to get on the ball and put Ken Russell's 1971 movie The Boy Friend on DVD?
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By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | May 31, 2007
ON JUNE 3, the Transport Group's fourth annual "Evening With" series -- at New York's Soho Playhouse -- features a conversation with Broadway's tallest drink of water -- dancer, singer, actor, choreographer, director, producer -- Tommy Tune. The nine-time Tony winner will talk about the career that began in Wichita Falls, Texas, and marched onto The Great White Way with Nine, Grand Hotel, The Will Rogers Follies, A Day In Hollywood/A Night In the Ukraine and My One and Only. And I wonder when MGM is going to get on the ball and put Ken Russell's 1971 movie The Boy Friend on DVD?
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By New York Daily News | December 22, 1992
When somebody comes up to Tommy Tune and asks The Obvious, he breaks it to them gently: "5-feet-18 1/2 inches," he'll say."The half is new," he confesses with customary cheerfulness. "You know, when you turn 50" -- which he did three years ago (making him the oldest, as well as tallest, sprite in captivity) -- "you're supposed to go have a complete physical. I did, and, when the nurse asked how tall I was, I said '6-6.' She said, 'Why don't we see?' So she measured me, and I was 6-6 and 1/2 . I'm still growing!"
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By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 24, 1992
Tommy Tune and his fellow cast members from "Bye Bye Birdie" will present a benefit for the Chase-Brexton Clinic and Equity Fights AIDS at 11:30 p.m. Friday at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St.Titled "Backstage at Bye Bye Birdie," the benefit is an informal revue of Broadway show tunes that has been performed to sold-out audiences in Washington, Boston, Philadelphia and Tampa, raising a total of more than $50,000.Mr. Tune, a nine-time Tony Award winner, is the headliner in the touring production of "Bye Bye Birdie," currently playing at the Lyric Opera House.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 26, 1992
Tommy Tune and his fellow cast members from "Bye Bye Birdie" will present a benefit for the Chase-Brexton Clinic and Equity Fights AIDS at 11:30 p.m. Friday at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St.Titled "Backstage at Bye Bye Birdie," the benefit is an informal revue of Broadway show tunes that has been performed to sold-out audiences in Washington, Boston, Philadelphia and Tampa, raising a total of more than $50,000.Mr. Tune, a nine-time Tony Award winner, is the headliner in the touring production of "Bye Bye Birdie," currently playing at the Lyric Opera House.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 20, 1992
Giant Tinkertoys are the chief design motif in the production of "Bye Bye Birdie" that opened at the Lyric Opera House last night. And no doubt about it, this is Tinkertoy level material.That is to say, it's downright silly -- a relic that harks back to the good old days when musicals were still called "musical comedies." What makes this touring production fun is that it glorifies in its own silliness. From the Tinkertoy sets to the crayon-colored costumes, it doesn't pretend to be anything other than a teeny-bopping hop down memory lane.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | February 11, 2008
So the charming, the unique, the indestructible Cher is coming back! The Oscar-winning Cher, at 61, has had career success and longevity like few others. Remember this: She is the only artist to have a hit song in each of the past four decades. And as she preps to make a super splash at Caesars Palace in the Celine Dion venue, she is working on her 27th studio album. She told Nightline's Cynthia McFadden that her regrets are the things she didn't do -- like taking up Elvis Presley and Marlon Brando when they made a pass.
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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | February 25, 1991
THE SETTING IS the elegant Grand Hotel, cosmopolitan hub of 1928 Berlin. Rumbles of Germany's coming unrest are safely kept at bay as the beautiful people -- wealthy businessmen, acclaimed artists, impoverished nobility and the bourgeois hopeful -- try to fulfill unrealistic dreams.Overseeing all this is an embittered observer, Colonel Doctor Otternschlag, maimed in heart and body, who acts as a kind of solo Greek chorus, introducing the hotel's guests and staff. In song and prose he comments with ironic insight on their secrets, schemes and fates.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 6, 1993
Corny as it sounds, "The Will Rogers Follies" is a highly likable show about the man who never met a man he didn't like.When Keith Carradine, in the title role, says, "I'm happy when I'm standing up there in front of all those folks, and I know I'm making them happy," it sums up not only his performance, but also the overall effect of this razzle-dazzle musical, which opened at the Lyric Opera House last night.Subtitled, "A Life in Revue," "The Will Rogers Follies" -- score by Cy Coleman, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, book by Peter Stone, and direction and choreography by Tommy Tune -- is not a typical showbiz bio. Instead, Stone's clever book presents Rogers' life story within the format of a Ziegfeld Follies show.
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By New York Daily News | December 22, 1992
When somebody comes up to Tommy Tune and asks The Obvious, he breaks it to them gently: "5-feet-18 1/2 inches," he'll say."The half is new," he confesses with customary cheerfulness. "You know, when you turn 50" -- which he did three years ago (making him the oldest, as well as tallest, sprite in captivity) -- "you're supposed to go have a complete physical. I did, and, when the nurse asked how tall I was, I said '6-6.' She said, 'Why don't we see?' So she measured me, and I was 6-6 and 1/2 . I'm still growing!"
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 26, 1992
Tommy Tune and his fellow cast members from "Bye Bye Birdie" will present a benefit for the Chase-Brexton Clinic and Equity Fights AIDS at 11:30 p.m. Friday at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St.Titled "Backstage at Bye Bye Birdie," the benefit is an informal revue of Broadway show tunes that has been performed to sold-out audiences in Washington, Boston, Philadelphia and Tampa, raising a total of more than $50,000.Mr. Tune, a nine-time Tony Award winner, is the headliner in the touring production of "Bye Bye Birdie," currently playing at the Lyric Opera House.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 24, 1992
Tommy Tune and his fellow cast members from "Bye Bye Birdie" will present a benefit for the Chase-Brexton Clinic and Equity Fights AIDS at 11:30 p.m. Friday at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St.Titled "Backstage at Bye Bye Birdie," the benefit is an informal revue of Broadway show tunes that has been performed to sold-out audiences in Washington, Boston, Philadelphia and Tampa, raising a total of more than $50,000.Mr. Tune, a nine-time Tony Award winner, is the headliner in the touring production of "Bye Bye Birdie," currently playing at the Lyric Opera House.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 20, 1992
Giant Tinkertoys are the chief design motif in the production of "Bye Bye Birdie" that opened at the Lyric Opera House last night. And no doubt about it, this is Tinkertoy level material.That is to say, it's downright silly -- a relic that harks back to the good old days when musicals were still called "musical comedies." What makes this touring production fun is that it glorifies in its own silliness. From the Tinkertoy sets to the crayon-colored costumes, it doesn't pretend to be anything other than a teeny-bopping hop down memory lane.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 20, 1992
GIANT TINKERTOYS are the chief design motif in the production of "Bye Bye Birdie" that opened at the Lyric Opera House last night. And no doubt about it, this is Tinkertoy level material.That is to say, it's downright silly -- a relic that harks back to the good old days when musicals were still called "musical comedies." What makes this touring production fun is that it glorifies in its own silliness. From the Tinkertoy sets to the crayon-colored costumes, it doesn't pretend to be anything other than a teeny-bopping hop down memory lane.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 6, 1993
Corny as it sounds, "The Will Rogers Follies" is a highly likable show about the man who never met a man he didn't like.When Keith Carradine, in the title role, says, "I'm happy when I'm standing up there in front of all those folks, and I know I'm making them happy," it sums up not only his performance, but also the overall effect of this razzle-dazzle musical, which opened at the Lyric Opera House last night.Subtitled, "A Life in Revue," "The Will Rogers Follies" -- score by Cy Coleman, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, book by Peter Stone, and direction and choreography by Tommy Tune -- is not a typical showbiz bio. Instead, Stone's clever book presents Rogers' life story within the format of a Ziegfeld Follies show.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | February 17, 1991
Tommy Tune would see them in the lobbies of the old grand hotels of Europe, the aristocratic class caught short by the fast-forward of time, as faded as the furniture, as once-elegant and now-tattered as their surroundings."
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | February 25, 1991
THE SETTING IS the elegant Grand Hotel, cosmopolitan hub of 1928 Berlin. Rumbles of Germany's coming unrest are safely kept at bay as the beautiful people -- wealthy businessmen, acclaimed artists, impoverished nobility and the bourgeois hopeful -- try to fulfill unrealistic dreams.Overseeing all this is an embittered observer, Colonel Doctor Otternschlag, maimed in heart and body, who acts as a kind of solo Greek chorus, introducing the hotel's guests and staff. In song and prose he comments with ironic insight on their secrets, schemes and fates.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | February 17, 1991
Tommy Tune would see them in the lobbies of the old grand hotels of Europe, the aristocratic class caught short by the fast-forward of time, as faded as the furniture, as once-elegant and now-tattered as their surroundings."
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