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By Milton Kent | February 22, 1996
The recent disclosure that Tommy Morrison tested HIV-positive opens the latest chapter in the debate over when the public's interest in knowing details about the private lives of athletes runs smack-dab into the rights of those athletes to keep those things private.Though Morrison has spoken courageously about his conduct since the story was first published in the Los Angeles Times more than a week ago, the heavyweight boxer did not voluntarily come forward, and spoke only after the story had reached the public.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 4, 1996
TOKYO -- George Foreman was supposed to be too old and too fat to box. Tommy Morrison, some said, should not fight because he is infected with the virus that causes AIDS.But the two heavyweights overcame their doubters, at least for the moment, winning convincing victories over clearly overmatched opponents in Tokyo yesterday.The 47-year-old, 253-pound Foreman bested Crawford Grimsley, a 34-year-old former kick boxer, by a unanimous decision.Morrison, on the undercard, used powerful overhand rights to deck little-known Marcus Rhode three times in the first round, winning a mere 1 minute, 38 seconds after the opening bell.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 4, 1996
TOKYO -- George Foreman was supposed to be too old and too fat to box. Tommy Morrison, some said, should not fight because he is infected with the virus that causes AIDS.But the two heavyweights overcame their doubters, at least for the moment, winning convincing victories over clearly overmatched opponents in Tokyo yesterday.The 47-year-old, 253-pound Foreman bested Crawford Grimsley, a 34-year-old former kick boxer, by a unanimous decision.Morrison, on the undercard, used powerful overhand rights to deck little-known Marcus Rhode three times in the first round, winning a mere 1 minute, 38 seconds after the opening bell.
SPORTS
By BOSTON GLOBE | March 24, 1996
The home remedies have poured into the post office in Jay, Okla., and Tommy Morrison has considered all of them. A desperate man, like a desperate fighter, explores all options.It has been only a few weeks since Morrison tested positive for HIV the virus that causes AIDS on the eve of a scheduled fight with a journeyman named Arthur Weathers. Faster than a Joe Frazier left hook, Morrison's career was over.Morrison had just signed a promotional agreement with Don King and it was to have been his first appearance on a King card, but Morrison's dream of one day fighting Mike Tyson for the heavyweight title had been turned into a nightmare in which he was banned from boxing by the Nevada State Athletic Commission, a ban with which he has no quarrel.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | November 16, 1990
SYLVESTER Stallone has done it again. You would think his ''Rocky'' films would succumb to the law of averages, but the newest in the series, written by Stallone, is better than some of the others.''Rocky V'' has originality, and that's surprising in a boxing film. Aren't the stories always the same?Well, yes, they are, but this one braves a few new trails. When the film begins, the credits give us a review of the last film, one in which the Philadelphia boy took on the Russian champ and put him away.
SPORTS
By Wallace Matthews and Wallace Matthews,Newsday | July 10, 1991
Evander Holyfield and George Foreman are likely to meet in a rematch Nov. 8 at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas -- now that a last-ditch effort by promoter Don King to make a Holyfield-Mike Tyson fight has failed.Holyfield's promoter, Dan Duva, and manager, Shelly Finkel, met yesterday at the New York offices of Home Box Office with Foreman promoter Bob Arum and adviser Ron Weathers to hammer out details for a reprise of their April 19 bout, which was won by Holyfield. According to Finkel,an agreement was reached calling for roughly the same financial arrangement as in the first bout -- guarantees of $20 million for Holyfield and $12.5 million for Foreman.
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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 18, 1991
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Professional boxing always has thrived by matching men of different races and ethnic backgrounds. As former champion Muhammad Ali often said, "White plus black equals green for both fighters."That is why white boxers, such as Jerry Quarry in the 1970s and Gerry Cooney in the 1980s, were able to reap fortunes that far outweighed their boxing skills. In unsuccessful title bouts against Larry Holmes and Michael Spinks, Cooney earned $25 million.And now it is Tommy Morrison, 22, unbeaten (28-0, 24 knockouts)
SPORTS
By BOSTON GLOBE | March 24, 1996
The home remedies have poured into the post office in Jay, Okla., and Tommy Morrison has considered all of them. A desperate man, like a desperate fighter, explores all options.It has been only a few weeks since Morrison tested positive for HIV the virus that causes AIDS on the eve of a scheduled fight with a journeyman named Arthur Weathers. Faster than a Joe Frazier left hook, Morrison's career was over.Morrison had just signed a promotional agreement with Don King and it was to have been his first appearance on a King card, but Morrison's dream of one day fighting Mike Tyson for the heavyweight title had been turned into a nightmare in which he was banned from boxing by the Nevada State Athletic Commission, a ban with which he has no quarrel.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | July 6, 1995
What you think of this week's ratings is likely contingent on whether you find a half-consumed glass of water to be 50 percent full or 50 percent empty.Subscribers to the former theory, say people like Orioles owner Peter Angelos, would see the fact that Orioles games last week doubled all of its head-to-head competition and provided good lead-ins for succeeding telecasts, smile and say, "Verily, this is good."However, pessimists, like your basic ink-stained wretch reporter, would see the fact that only one of four recent Orioles telecasts surpassed its seasonal average, and none came close to last year's average, frown and say, "Gloom and despair reign over the land."
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | October 21, 1994
The TV Repairman:The Bassett Hound, Dan Dierdorf, and his buddies, Al Michaels and Frank Gifford, had a sensational night calling the Broncos-Chiefs game on "Monday Night Football." Dan lost his opening monologue to technical difficulties, a plus, but proved the lead guy in discussing targets of opportunity, not always football-related. After 25 years and about 400 games, even the most ardent NFL fan doesn't insist upon knowing if the defensive team is in a double zone.The trio discussed the length of the tail of the horse galloping around Mile High Stadium, the old TV dummy Jerry Mahoney ("I knew him when he was a kid," said elder statesman Gifford)
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | February 22, 1996
The recent disclosure that Tommy Morrison tested HIV-positive opens the latest chapter in the debate over when the public's interest in knowing details about the private lives of athletes runs smack-dab into the rights of those athletes to keep those things private.Though Morrison has spoken courageously about his conduct since the story was first published in the Los Angeles Times more than a week ago, the heavyweight boxer did not voluntarily come forward, and spoke only after the story had reached the public.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | July 6, 1995
What you think of this week's ratings is likely contingent on whether you find a half-consumed glass of water to be 50 percent full or 50 percent empty.Subscribers to the former theory, say people like Orioles owner Peter Angelos, would see the fact that Orioles games last week doubled all of its head-to-head competition and provided good lead-ins for succeeding telecasts, smile and say, "Verily, this is good."However, pessimists, like your basic ink-stained wretch reporter, would see the fact that only one of four recent Orioles telecasts surpassed its seasonal average, and none came close to last year's average, frown and say, "Gloom and despair reign over the land."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1995
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Peering through two battle-scarred eyes after his lusty 10-round heavyweight brawl with Ray Mercer on Saturday night, Evander Holyfield smiled and said, "All you have to do is believe. God does heal."Holyfield, 34, who had retired briefly after being diagnosed as having heart problems following his title loss to Michael Moorer last April, made believers of a sellout crowd of 11,128 at Convention Hall.Trailing on all three judges cards after seven rounds, the two-time former champion proved he was whole again by calling on a reservoir of will and stamina to sweep the last three rounds and gain a unanimous decision.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | October 21, 1994
The TV Repairman:The Bassett Hound, Dan Dierdorf, and his buddies, Al Michaels and Frank Gifford, had a sensational night calling the Broncos-Chiefs game on "Monday Night Football." Dan lost his opening monologue to technical difficulties, a plus, but proved the lead guy in discussing targets of opportunity, not always football-related. After 25 years and about 400 games, even the most ardent NFL fan doesn't insist upon knowing if the defensive team is in a double zone.The trio discussed the length of the tail of the horse galloping around Mile High Stadium, the old TV dummy Jerry Mahoney ("I knew him when he was a kid," said elder statesman Gifford)
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | March 24, 1994
Reading Time: Two Minutes.You have to love the reaction of Danya Abrams, the Boston College player who made a chopping motion worthy of Chuck Norris that rendered Derrick Phelps of North Carolina senseless and with a concussion Sunday at USAir Arena: "It kind of hurts me for people to think I'm the bad guy because of this. I went over to help him up and see if he was OK."Yeah, that makes it all better, kid.* With his latest stunt of switching sides in a proposed move of a minor-league team from Albany, N.Y., to Norwich, Conn.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | January 15, 1993
Don't be surprised if, after years of outright neglect, the networks jump back into covering boxing with both feet. If and when it happens, they will have cable to thank for first sustaining then moving to return the popularity of the sweet science.For example, USA Network, with its "Tuesday Night Fights" series, which will be on 45 weeks in 1993, has gone head-to-head with NBA basketball on TNT six times lately, and it has been no contest. While the boxers have been averaging a 2.5 rating, the NBA has run up a 1.9, a 32 percent disparity.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | March 24, 1994
Reading Time: Two Minutes.You have to love the reaction of Danya Abrams, the Boston College player who made a chopping motion worthy of Chuck Norris that rendered Derrick Phelps of North Carolina senseless and with a concussion Sunday at USAir Arena: "It kind of hurts me for people to think I'm the bad guy because of this. I went over to help him up and see if he was OK."Yeah, that makes it all better, kid.* With his latest stunt of switching sides in a proposed move of a minor-league team from Albany, N.Y., to Norwich, Conn.
SPORTS
February 17, 1992
Aussie breaks mark in 800-meter freestyleAustralian Keiren Perkins broke his world record in the 800-meter freestyle swimming event at the New South Wales state championships yesterday in Sydney, Australia.Perkins, 18, clipped 1.25 seconds off his mark with a time of 7 minutes, 46.60 seconds. He had set the old mark in August.He is the first Australian to set a world record in Australia since Tracey Wickham broke the women's 1,500-meter freestyle record in 1979 in Perth.* UMBC, with eight swimmers, won 13 of 20 events, including five Saturday, and tied with Towson State for second place in the women's portion of the East Coast Conference swimming and diving championships, which concluded Saturday night in Buffalo, N.Y. The University of Buffalo won the men's and the women's team titles.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | March 27, 1992
Awaiting word of Mike Tyson's sentencing in Indianapolis yesterday on a rape conviction, his estranged manager, Bill Cayton, focused on a fight poster hanging in his New York office that showed a scowling Tyson squaring off against Jose Ribalta before their non-title bout in Atlantic City, N.J., in 1986."
SPORTS
February 17, 1992
Aussie breaks mark in 800-meter freestyleAustralian Keiren Perkins broke his world record in the 800-meter freestyle swimming event at the New South Wales state championships yesterday in Sydney, Australia.Perkins, 18, clipped 1.25 seconds off his mark with a time of 7 minutes, 46.60 seconds. He had set the old mark in August.He is the first Australian to set a world record in Australia since Tracey Wickham broke the women's 1,500-meter freestyle record in 1979 in Perth.* UMBC, with eight swimmers, won 13 of 20 events, including five Saturday, and tied with Towson State for second place in the women's portion of the East Coast Conference swimming and diving championships, which concluded Saturday night in Buffalo, N.Y. The University of Buffalo won the men's and the women's team titles.
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