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NEWS
February 22, 1995
Yank Lawson, 83, a jazz trumpeter who played with renowned combos of the big band era, died Saturday in Indianapolis. He joined Ben Pollack's band in 1933 and the Bob Crosby band in 1934. He also played with Benny Goodman and Tommy Dorsey.
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By Bob Allen | November 21, 2011
It takes a Big Band sound to battle the disco, punk, thrash rock, heavy metal and country-pop now dominating national soundtracks. But that's exactly what the Zim Zemarel Band has done in the greater Baltimore area for the better part of 50 years. And even though Zemarel himself died in 1999, at age 82, his former band mates Gene Bonner, 77, of Perry Hall, and Wayne Hudson, 68, of Pasadena, are still carrying the torch for the band, and for Tommy Dorsey- and Benny Goodman-style 1940s Big Band music itself.
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NEWS
October 20, 2002
Nikolai Rukavishnikov, 70, a cosmonaut who in three trips into outer space for the former Soviet Union encountered major problems twice, died yesterday in Moscow of an apparent heart attack, Russian news media reported. Mr. Rukavishnikov's first space voyage was in 1971 aboard the Soyuz 10, which was to have delivered the first humans to the orbiting Salyut-1 space station. The craft docked with the station, but the crew was unable to gain access, reportedly because of a faulty hatch, and the mission was aborted.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
John W. Pierson Jr., a semiretired insurance executive who enjoyed sailing the bay and listening to 1930s and '40s big-band music, died Aug. 16 of Parkinson's disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Middle River resident was 87. Mr. Pierson, the son of a radiologist and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and was raised in an apartment above his father's office in the 1100 block of St. Paul St. After graduating from Gilman School in 1941, he began his college studies at Haverford College in Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | June 25, 1998
As the swing sounds of the '30s and '40s are being augmented by today's swing revival bands, swing fans can choose between two styles. There are the original hits of Count Basie, Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey and the like (still in print on CD), and there's the gutsy sound of these young swingers (on disc and MTV), which draws on the past without being defined by it.Some fans may swing both ways, while others will prefer one style over the other. Here's a sampling of both.Vintage swing:* Glenn Miller, "Chattanooga Choo Choo: No. 1 Hits" (Bluebird 3102)
NEWS
June 11, 2006
Jazz Ensemble's spring concert The Carroll County Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of Glenn W. Patterson, will present its second annual spring concert, "Sentimental Journey 2006," at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Winters Mill High School auditorium, 560 Gorsuch Road. Featured musicians include Herb Sell, piano; Brad Collins, vocals and tenor saxophone; Gil Rathel, trumpet; David Motter, trombone; Jeff Boone, alto and soprano saxophone; Charles Berry, trumpet; Erik True, drums; Jeff Hiner, bass; and Debbie Blanchard and Glenn Patterson, vocals.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 15, 1994
Why is it that, of all the big band leaders, Glenn Miller seems to tower over the rest?Even now, 50 years to the day since his plane disappeared over the English Channel, Miller remains a cultural icon. It isn't just that his recordings continue to sell and his arrangements are still being played; it's the fact that even those whose parents weren't born when Miller died recognize the sound of "Chattanooga Choo-Choo" and "In the Mood." For millions of Americans, Miller virtually epitomizes the big band era.Why, though?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
John W. Pierson Jr., a semiretired insurance executive who enjoyed sailing the bay and listening to 1930s and '40s big-band music, died Aug. 16 of Parkinson's disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Middle River resident was 87. Mr. Pierson, the son of a radiologist and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and was raised in an apartment above his father's office in the 1100 block of St. Paul St. After graduating from Gilman School in 1941, he began his college studies at Haverford College in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 3, 2000
Ghosts of yesterday ADD Tex Beneke to the ranks of swing-era stars who have gone to that big bandstand in the sky. He died this week at 86. Arthritis had robbed him of his ability to play the saxophone. But he could still sing "Chattanooga Choo-Choo," "Kalamazoo" and other of his standards. His Tex Beneke Orchestra will go on performing, joining dozens of other "ghost bands" that are much in demand despite the demise of their founders. The Glenn Miller Orchestra, which catapulted Tex Beneke into stardom, is the granddaddy of them all. It is still going strong -- 56 years after its leader's plane disappeared during World War II. Staffed by sidemen in their 20s, the Miller band maintains a busy schedule, visiting Maryland several times a year.
NEWS
By Lawrence Freeny | January 3, 2000
ZIM Zemarel, the late Baltimore bandleader, was a determined exemplar of the swinging Big Band sound that -- with the likes of Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw and Tommy Dorsey -- filled night clubs, dance halls and the national radio airwaves in the 1940s. His cheerful, enthusiastic manner, both in directing his band and in private conversations, was such that the nickname Zim (his real surname was Emil) could be truly equated with Vim. Several interview appointments with him in his Baltimore County home in the 1970s were repeatedly interrupted by telephone callers setting dates for appearances by the band or by a smaller group of the band members.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 6, 2007
Albin J. Grden, a violinist, clarinetist and saxophonist who taught in Baltimore public schools for more than four decades and was a longtime member of the Baltimore City Municipal Park Band, died Aug. 30 of kidney failure at Oak Crest Village. He was 81. Mr. Grden was born in Baltimore into a musical family. His father, a Polish immigrant, played the violin, and his mother played and taught piano. "I guess Al started playing violin when he was 8 years old, and he'd practice, practice and practice," said a brother, Eugene C. Grden of White Hall.
NEWS
June 11, 2006
Jazz Ensemble's spring concert The Carroll County Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of Glenn W. Patterson, will present its second annual spring concert, "Sentimental Journey 2006," at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Winters Mill High School auditorium, 560 Gorsuch Road. Featured musicians include Herb Sell, piano; Brad Collins, vocals and tenor saxophone; Gil Rathel, trumpet; David Motter, trombone; Jeff Boone, alto and soprano saxophone; Charles Berry, trumpet; Erik True, drums; Jeff Hiner, bass; and Debbie Blanchard and Glenn Patterson, vocals.
NEWS
October 20, 2002
Nikolai Rukavishnikov, 70, a cosmonaut who in three trips into outer space for the former Soviet Union encountered major problems twice, died yesterday in Moscow of an apparent heart attack, Russian news media reported. Mr. Rukavishnikov's first space voyage was in 1971 aboard the Soyuz 10, which was to have delivered the first humans to the orbiting Salyut-1 space station. The craft docked with the station, but the crew was unable to gain access, reportedly because of a faulty hatch, and the mission was aborted.
NEWS
June 3, 2000
Ghosts of yesterday ADD Tex Beneke to the ranks of swing-era stars who have gone to that big bandstand in the sky. He died this week at 86. Arthritis had robbed him of his ability to play the saxophone. But he could still sing "Chattanooga Choo-Choo," "Kalamazoo" and other of his standards. His Tex Beneke Orchestra will go on performing, joining dozens of other "ghost bands" that are much in demand despite the demise of their founders. The Glenn Miller Orchestra, which catapulted Tex Beneke into stardom, is the granddaddy of them all. It is still going strong -- 56 years after its leader's plane disappeared during World War II. Staffed by sidemen in their 20s, the Miller band maintains a busy schedule, visiting Maryland several times a year.
NEWS
By Lawrence Freeny | January 3, 2000
ZIM Zemarel, the late Baltimore bandleader, was a determined exemplar of the swinging Big Band sound that -- with the likes of Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw and Tommy Dorsey -- filled night clubs, dance halls and the national radio airwaves in the 1940s. His cheerful, enthusiastic manner, both in directing his band and in private conversations, was such that the nickname Zim (his real surname was Emil) could be truly equated with Vim. Several interview appointments with him in his Baltimore County home in the 1970s were repeatedly interrupted by telephone callers setting dates for appearances by the band or by a smaller group of the band members.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | June 25, 1998
As the swing sounds of the '30s and '40s are being augmented by today's swing revival bands, swing fans can choose between two styles. There are the original hits of Count Basie, Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey and the like (still in print on CD), and there's the gutsy sound of these young swingers (on disc and MTV), which draws on the past without being defined by it.Some fans may swing both ways, while others will prefer one style over the other. Here's a sampling of both.Vintage swing:* Glenn Miller, "Chattanooga Choo Choo: No. 1 Hits" (Bluebird 3102)
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | November 21, 2011
It takes a Big Band sound to battle the disco, punk, thrash rock, heavy metal and country-pop now dominating national soundtracks. But that's exactly what the Zim Zemarel Band has done in the greater Baltimore area for the better part of 50 years. And even though Zemarel himself died in 1999, at age 82, his former band mates Gene Bonner, 77, of Perry Hall, and Wayne Hudson, 68, of Pasadena, are still carrying the torch for the band, and for Tommy Dorsey- and Benny Goodman-style 1940s Big Band music itself.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 6, 2007
Albin J. Grden, a violinist, clarinetist and saxophonist who taught in Baltimore public schools for more than four decades and was a longtime member of the Baltimore City Municipal Park Band, died Aug. 30 of kidney failure at Oak Crest Village. He was 81. Mr. Grden was born in Baltimore into a musical family. His father, a Polish immigrant, played the violin, and his mother played and taught piano. "I guess Al started playing violin when he was 8 years old, and he'd practice, practice and practice," said a brother, Eugene C. Grden of White Hall.
NEWS
February 22, 1995
Yank Lawson, 83, a jazz trumpeter who played with renowned combos of the big band era, died Saturday in Indianapolis. He joined Ben Pollack's band in 1933 and the Bob Crosby band in 1934. He also played with Benny Goodman and Tommy Dorsey.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 15, 1994
Why is it that, of all the big band leaders, Glenn Miller seems to tower over the rest?Even now, 50 years to the day since his plane disappeared over the English Channel, Miller remains a cultural icon. It isn't just that his recordings continue to sell and his arrangements are still being played; it's the fact that even those whose parents weren't born when Miller died recognize the sound of "Chattanooga Choo-Choo" and "In the Mood." For millions of Americans, Miller virtually epitomizes the big band era.Why, though?
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