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Tombstone

NEWS
December 19, 2001
IT'S NOT much -- a pathetic 15 cents, to be exact -- but it's a start. A lifetime journey of college loan repayment began mid-morning in late November during a tour of Baltimore that included some notables resting at Green Mount Cemetery. The tour is a specialty of my editor at this newspaper, David Michael Ettlin, offered to staff newcomers -- even folks like me, who grew up here but never really saw the diversity of this town. The frenetic 60-mile drive ranges from the urban decadence of Guilford to the decay of the Gay Street corridor.
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NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff Writer | May 19, 1992
Pat Favoy doesn't have to worry now that somebody else will be buried on top of her dead son in an Annapolis cemetery.When 7-year-old Olonzo died of liver cancer in February, Favoy, a single mother, had no money to bury him. Friends raised the money. But another $500 was needed for a gravestone.Favoy shopped around for the least expensive stone, but even those were beyond her means. She wept that she would be unable to put flowers on her child's grave; when the grass grew back in Pine Lawn Memorial Park, she wouldn't even know where it was.Then the county's hospice -- and a church youth group -- stepped in to help.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1997
A Dundalk stonecutter and his wife face state charges today that they bilked grieving families out of more than $70,000 in a scheme of promising tombstones but never delivering.John R. Wilkinson, 60, and his wife, Frances, are charged with more than 80 complaints that they violated Maryland's Consumer Protection Act while operating Dundalk Memorials near Sacred Heart of Mary Cemetery on German Hill Road, Assistant Attorney General William D. Gruhn said.The civil complaints are the latest in a series of legal confrontations for Wilkinson, whose grandfather started hand-carving monuments in Baltimore in the late 19th century.
NEWS
By CAROL J. WILLIAMS and CAROL J. WILLIAMS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 21, 2006
FRIGATE BAY, St. Kitts and Nevis -- Greenpeace activists went ashore yesterday in motorized rubber boats to plant cardboard tombstones on the beach in protest of the killing of nearly 2,000 whales a year despite a global ban on commercial whaling. St. Kitts police, armed with tear gas and machine guns, quickly arrested the 10 activists, although the protest was peaceful. The demonstration was aimed at spotlighting what Japan says is whaling for scientific research and the support that Tokyo has won from smaller countries here at the International Whaling Commission's annual meeting.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1997
A Dundalk stonecutter and his wife were ordered yesterday to repay $93,000 to grieving customers they bilked by accepting money for tombstones never delivered.Maryland's attorney general ordered John and Frances Wilkinson to repay the money to more than 70 customers who contracted John Wilkinson's services and made down payments, but never received grave markers."This company cheated its customers at a time when they were extremely vulnerable," said Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr."When people are trying to cope with the loss of a loved one, they shouldn't have to worry about whether the grave marker they've ordered is going to be delivered," Curran said.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | July 9, 1991
A 27-year-old former employee of the Woodlawn Cemetery was arrested yesterday for desecrating the western Baltimore County graveyard where 89 tombstones were overturned last week.Walter Norman MacFarlane, an auto mechanic who lives in the 2300 block of Poplar Drive in Woodlawn, was charged with vandalizing the cemetery with two teen-aged boys after a night of drinking, said Sgt. Stephen R. Doarnberger, a police spokesman.The boys, 14 and 15, surrenderred to authorities about 8 p.m. Sunday and were released to their parents after being charged as juveniles with graveyard desecration, malicious destruction of property and trespassing, Sergeant Doarnberger said.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Richard Irwin and Joe Nawrozki and Richard Irwin,Evening Sun Staff | July 5, 1991
Vandals overturned more than 80 ornate grave monuments -- some worth $10,000 -- at the Woodlawn Cemetery in Baltimore County, police said.The granite monuments stood in two long rows in the old section of the cemetery where the first burial dates to 1904, the year of the Baltimore Fire.According to Betty Young, general manager of the cemetery, the destruction was discovered yesterday by a local resident who was visiting the grave of a relative.Young said a total of 87 monuments were knocked over sometime after dark Wednesday.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2005
ST. LEONARD -- In the more than 300 years since his violent death, the life and memory of Christopher Rousby have been commemorated, miscalculated, relocated and all but obliterated. And now, after all these years, the long-ago tax collector for the king still can't seem to find a proper resting place. Rousby, who was killed at the hands of a cousin of Lord Baltimore in 1684, was buried under a 1,000-pound slab of limestone soon after his death. If only he was left there in peace. At some point after his burial, his remains were lost.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1999
For Susan Carl, the mystery of the missing soldier began 20 years ago with a single clue -- a yellowed newspaper obituary from October 1862, pasted into a family Bible.It ended yesterday in a sea of white tombstones on a grassy hill in the sun, where Carl and her cousin, Elaine Wescott, paid last respects to the fallen Union infantryman they'd finally tracked down.He was their great-great-great uncle, William Henry Burns, and he'd died of a leg wound suffered on the bloodiest day of the Civil War, the Battle of Antietam.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
Mary Ann "Mimi" Ashcraft, After 23 years tramping through woods, fields and churchyards, volunteers with the Carroll County Genealogical Society are wrapping up a project to record every pre-1950 tombstone they could find in the county. Most used clipboards to jot down not only the names and pertinent dates of the deceased, but notes about decorative carvings and verse, stone work, cemetery histories and settings or any other interesting details. The volunteers estimate they have copied more than 70,000 names from more than 250 places in Carroll since the project began in 1982.
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