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By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,Staff Writer | February 23, 1992
LES MENUIRES, France -- The question came to Alberto Tomba toward the end of the news confer-ence. He had won the silver medal in the Olympic slalom yesterday, not another gold but still not bad, and he had been answering questions for about 20 minutes.An American reporter raised her hand. "Alberto," she said, "it was reported in the Italian press that after the last Olympics you quickly fell into a life of eating, drinking and womanizing. Do you anticipate it happening again?"Tomba paused and, after speaking only Italian throughout the news conference, lowered his mouth to the microphone and answered in perfect English.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 13, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- Once, he was La Bomba, a brash young racer whose merry-go-round life revolved around skiing, wine and women.Now, he is 31, with flecks of gray in his hair and circles forming beneath his eyes. He talks of retirement and marriage, discusses impending movie deals, and sounds like a jaded, jet-lagged traveler who laments being on the road for 10 months a year.Yet Alberto Tomba of Italy is still racing, still chasing after medals.Tomba is at the Winter Olympics, making one last bid for greatness.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1994
OYER, Norway -- Alberto Tomba doesn't do mornings.Too little sleep. Too much to do.He does the afternoons. When the races are won and lost. When the celebrations begin.Yesterday afternoon, under a covering of snow clouds, he came roaring down a mountain, trying to make up time from the morning run, trying to reclaim victory in his final slalom race at the Winter Olympics.He nearly fell at the second gate, but he raced on. He nearly slipped in the middle, but he raced harder. And when he reached the bottom, he was in full roar, bashing down gates, riding the course, sliding through the finish and looking up to the clock, seeing the time, and finally, throwing his hands down in disgust.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1994
OYER, Norway -- Alberto Tomba doesn't do mornings.Too little sleep. Too much to do.He does the afternoons. When the races are won and lost. When the celebrations begin.Yesterday afternoon, under a covering of snow clouds, he came roaring down a mountain, trying to make up time from the morning run, trying to reclaim victory in his final slalom race at the Winter Olympics.He nearly fell at the second gate, but he raced on. He nearly slipped in the middle, but he raced harder. And when he reached the bottom, he was in full roar, bashing down gates, riding the course, sliding through the finish and looking up to the clock, seeing the time, and finally, throwing his hands down in disgust.
SPORTS
By Timothy Dwyer and Timothy Dwyer,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 18, 1992
VAL D'ISERE, France -- All winter long he has promised to make history. Not only has he predicted two gold medals for himself, but he has vowed to do it with such style, such grace, such power and domination that the people of France will bow at his feet and change the name of the Olympics to the "Albertoville Olympics."Guess who just blew in from Italy?Yes, Alberto Tomba has arrived with his customary bluster and today he was going to shut his mouth long enough to begin his conquest of men and mountains.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,Staff Writer | February 19, 1992
VAL D'ISERE, France -- They came pouring over the mountains from the nearby Italian border, traveling by car, bus and train: thousands of Italians waving signs, banners and 20-foot flags of red, white and green, their faces painted, their voices hoarse.They organized a sunrise march yesterday through the streets of this tiny resort, singing soccer songs, stomping their boots in the snow and waving their arms, making sure everyone in town knew this was the day.Finally, when it was time for the men's Olympic giant slalom, they gathered eight-deep along the finish line to cheer Alberto Tomba.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 19, 1994
Harrowing experience: Mental alacrity of Alberto Tomba again being questioned after Italian ski superstar was caught in a power outage at an Oslo department store and trapped on the escalator for two hours.The White House on Line 1: President Clinton's congratulatory call to gold medalist Dan Jansen included this abrupt aside: "Bosnia -- do we bomb or what?" After a startled Jansen replied he had no foreign policy experience to speak of, the president smoothly shifted gears and asked if Jansen had seen "Ace Ventura, Pet Detective."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 13, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- Once, he was La Bomba, a brash young racer whose merry-go-round life revolved around skiing, wine and women.Now, he is 31, with flecks of gray in his hair and circles forming beneath his eyes. He talks of retirement and marriage, discusses impending movie deals, and sounds like a jaded, jet-lagged traveler who laments being on the road for 10 months a year.Yet Alberto Tomba of Italy is still racing, still chasing after medals.Tomba is at the Winter Olympics, making one last bid for greatness.
NEWS
February 24, 1994
Bonnie Blair was golden in her final Olympics as she blew past the competition in the 1,000-meter speed skating, winning the fifth gold medal of her Olympic career -- more than any other female athlete in U.S. history.Also yesterday at the Winter Games in Lillehammer, Norway, the U.S. hockey team lost to Finland and Italian Alberto Tomba bombed in the giant slalom.* Finland, undefeated in six hockey games, rolled past Team USA, 6-1, ending America's hopes for its first hockey medal since it won gold in 1980.
SPORTS
February 16, 1992
A French army officer on security duty at the Olympics was killed in an avalanche near the Courchevel venue yesterday afternoon, officials said.Hubert Marcy, head of an Alpine patrol squad, was working alone in the mountains when he was caught in the snowslide, said Stefanie Tisserond, a spokeswoman for the organizers.Help arrived quickly, but too late to save him.Skiing for his supperAlberto Tomba hopes to repay his dinner host, Italian auto tycoon Umberto Agnelli, with "golden skis."Agnelli, vice-president of the family-owned Fiat automaker, invited Italy's No. 1 Alpine skier to join him for dinner at his villa while Tomba is training in Italy.
SPORTS
February 26, 1994
Dan Jansen will close out his often-heartbreaking, but finally golden Olympic career carrying the American flag in tomorrow's closing ceremonies.Jansen, who set a world record in the 1,000-meter speed skating race after seven Olympic failures, was chosen yesterday by his teammates as flag bearer.Luge racer Cammy Myler of Lake Placid, N.Y., carried the flag in front of the U.S. team in the opening ceremony Feb. 12."It's an honor because it seems very appropriate to end my Olympic career with something like this," Jansen said.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 24, 1994
The TV Repairman:Now that (pause for effect) was big. Big-big.Think about it. Television doesn't even show the warmups at the Super Bowl as CBS did while presenting the first round of the great Tonya vs. Nancy battle.Notice! Due to technical difficulty, Ms. Harding's, there will be no concluding chapter. It will hurt ratings, yes, Tonya gazing up from 10th position after the ladies' short program, but leader Ms. Kerrigan will still have her hands full with Europe's best, Oksana Baiul and Surya Bonaly, ready to pounce.
SPORTS
February 24, 1994
RINGEBU, Norway -- Tomba did La Bomba, but Germany's Markus Wasmeier proved that there is at least one senior citizen on Hafjell's slopes who remains primed for Olympic success.Wasmeier, 30, emerged as the unlikely gold medalist in the men's giant slalom yesterday, marking only his second giant slalom victory in a decade.Before a crowd of about 30,000 spectators who expected to see Italy's Alberto Tomba crowned king of the hill, Wasmeier pocketed his second Olympic gold after winning the Super G competition last week.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 24, 1994
Hyperbole 101 -- CBS' understated "TONIGHT THEY SKATE!" promo for Tonya-Nancy showdown said to be inspired by same restrained producer who originated "JAPANESE BOMB PEARL HARBOR!"Unless it was too much makeup -- Tonya Harding's desultory performance and 10th place finish in women's technical program now being blamed on Connie Chung's incessant badgering as well as ill-fated decision to wear bowling shirt from "Bob's Qwik-Mart" during competition.How would you like that steak? -- Finland's 6-1 rout of Team USA in hockey leaves Americans out of medal contention and coach Tim Taylor quietly looking into a job at Sizzler's in Cromwell, Conn.
NEWS
February 24, 1994
Bonnie Blair was golden in her final Olympics as she blew past the competition in the 1,000-meter speed skating, winning the fifth gold medal of her Olympic career -- more than any other female athlete in U.S. history.Also yesterday at the Winter Games in Lillehammer, Norway, the U.S. hockey team lost to Finland and Italian Alberto Tomba bombed in the giant slalom.* Finland, undefeated in six hockey games, rolled past Team USA, 6-1, ending America's hopes for its first hockey medal since it won gold in 1980.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 19, 1994
Harrowing experience: Mental alacrity of Alberto Tomba again being questioned after Italian ski superstar was caught in a power outage at an Oslo department store and trapped on the escalator for two hours.The White House on Line 1: President Clinton's congratulatory call to gold medalist Dan Jansen included this abrupt aside: "Bosnia -- do we bomb or what?" After a startled Jansen replied he had no foreign policy experience to speak of, the president smoothly shifted gears and asked if Jansen had seen "Ace Ventura, Pet Detective."
SPORTS
February 24, 1994
RINGEBU, Norway -- Tomba did La Bomba, but Germany's Markus Wasmeier proved that there is at least one senior citizen on Hafjell's slopes who remains primed for Olympic success.Wasmeier, 30, emerged as the unlikely gold medalist in the men's giant slalom yesterday, marking only his second giant slalom victory in a decade.Before a crowd of about 30,000 spectators who expected to see Italy's Alberto Tomba crowned king of the hill, Wasmeier pocketed his second Olympic gold after winning the Super G competition last week.
SPORTS
February 26, 1994
Dan Jansen will close out his often-heartbreaking, but finally golden Olympic career carrying the American flag in tomorrow's closing ceremonies.Jansen, who set a world record in the 1,000-meter speed skating race after seven Olympic failures, was chosen yesterday by his teammates as flag bearer.Luge racer Cammy Myler of Lake Placid, N.Y., carried the flag in front of the U.S. team in the opening ceremony Feb. 12."It's an honor because it seems very appropriate to end my Olympic career with something like this," Jansen said.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | February 19, 1994
LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- Tonya Harding, the legal pit bull of the U.S. Olympic Team, said thanks to God for answering her prayers and giving her the chance to compete in the Games of Lillehammer.Alberto Tomba, the famously nocturnal Italian skier, said that he had brought his own condoms from home.Tonya Harding said that she believed most of the people in the United States were cheering for her.Alberto Tomba said that he hoped the parties in the Olympic village would start getting better soon.
NEWS
February 12, 1994
The irony of the XVIIth Winter Olympiad that opens in Lillehammer, Norway, tonight is that these winter games were moved up a couple of years so as not to have to compete for attention in the same year with the Summer Olympics.Of course, that was before Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding became household names. (Has there ever been a plot that produced such unintended results? The attack on Ms. Kerrigan, with the intent of elevating Ms. Harding, has, in fact, made Ms. Kerrigan a white-hot commodity even if she does not medal in Lillehammer, while Ms. Harding's career potential is nil even if she does.
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