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By Los Angeles Times | May 16, 1995
Scientists have uncovered what may be the largest underground tomb ever found in Egypt's fabled Valley of the Kings -- a mausoleum in which may lie buried 50 sons of Ramses II, the red-haired pharaoh of Exodus who ruled Egypt at the zenith of its power more than 3,000 years ago."We were the first people inside parts of the tomb in 3,000 years," said Dr. Kent R. Weeks, an Egyptologist at the American University in Cairo who made the find public yesterday.Archaeologists excavating the tomb so far have identified 67 chambers -- about five times more than is common in other tombs in the valley where so many of ancient Egypt's rulers were buried.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | March 31, 2013
Well, we wanted carnage in the season finale of The Walking Dead , and we got it. I have a feeling most viewers will consider this episode tame, though, since the Governor is still kicking and the war between the prison and Woodbury still hasn't quite been resolved. We'll just have to wait until season four to find out how this story ends! AMC has us eating out of its hands... When you think about it though, this episode was pretty strong. There was an actual skirmish between the prison and Woodbury, the Governor lost his mind and killed off almost all of his troops, two major human characters died (and a boatload of insignificant ones)
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 5, 1991
MOSCOW -- On the other side of the Kremlin's big brick wall, deputies were debating whether to vote the government he founded out of existence, but out here in Red Square a steady stream of visitors was still coming to file in respectful silence past the earthly remains of Vladimir I. Lenin.Some came out of respect; most out of curiosity.He was the man, after all, who launched the communist experimentupon the world -- the experiment that came crashing down here with such apparent finality over the past two weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | May 14, 2012
News Roundup •••• "Tomb Raider," a reboot of the classic series, has been delayed until Q1 of 2013. Darrell Gallagher, head of Crystal Dynamics (who is developing the game), announced the news via a post on the Eidos forums. [ Gamespot ] •••• Investors are trying to recoup their losses on a failed "Stargate" MMORPG that was due to launch in 2010. Things have gone to court, with the game's developer alleged to have mislead investors to the tune of $50 million.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | July 24, 1994
Masons and wall painters invaded the place, made a mess of things and walked off the job. Then Betsy Bryan moved in.But Dr. Bryan isn't upset. She's grateful for the chance to sift through the debris and scrutinize the unfinished paint job.That's because feckless contractors bugged out about 3,400 years ago, in the age of the pharaohs. And this house was never a home. It's a tomb carved out of a limestone cliff on the fringe of the ancient city of Thebes, overlooking the Nile.Most important, said Dr. Bryan, an Egyptologist with the Johns Hopkins University, the tomb's 18 walls hold frescoes abandoned in various degrees of completion, from first rough sketches through finished scenes.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | October 27, 2006
A team of Johns Hopkins University archaeologists digging in northern Syria this past summer found a 4,000-year-old tomb filled with human and animal remains, along with gold and silver artifacts. The tomb, one of at least eight at the site, is believed to be part of a royal cemetery in the ancient city of Tuba, one of Syria's first settlements and the capital of a small kingdom, according to Glenn Schwartz, a Hopkins professor of Near Eastern studies. The newly discovered tombs contain signs of ritual sacrifice, including the skeletons of infants and decapitated donkeys, as well as puppy bones, Schwartz said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1998
Four members of Carroll County Seniors in Action were invited to place a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Wednesday morning, an honor usually reserved for the military, officials and dignitaries, and rarely extended to citizens.Betty Howes, group president, called the ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery "the greatest honor of my life.""To use a modern word, it was awesome," said Howes. "We were so touched to see the soldiers doing their steps in such precision and to hear 'Taps' playing."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 28, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Fourteen years after being laid to rest at the Tomb of the Unknowns, the remains of a Vietnam War serviceman may soon be disinterred in an unprecedented, high-tech effort to determine whether they belong to an Air Force pilot who crashed in 1972.A Pentagon panel recommended yesterday that Defense Secretary William S. Cohen approve the first-ever removal of a body from the gleaming marble memorial at Arlington National Cemetery that has been visited by millions of tourists."There are concerns about the sanctity of the Tomb," Charles Cragin, assistant secretary of defense for reserve affairs, told reporters.
NEWS
By Michael McGuire and Michael McGuire,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 14, 2005
VATICAN CITY - Thousands of pilgrims and tourists, including sandal-footed Franciscan monks and curious sightseers from afar, filed down a somber avenue of papal tombs yesterday to whisper prayers and lower their heads before the final resting place of Pope John Paul II. Some said they had arrived as early as 5 a.m. to stand in line before the gates swung open two hours later on the first day the late pope's tomb was made available for viewing by the...
NEWS
By Susannah Rosenblatt and Susannah Rosenblatt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Tomb of the Unknowns, the memorial that honors unidentified American servicemen and servicewomen killed in battle and attracts millions of visitors annually, is being replaced after 72 years. The white marble monument atop a hill in Arlington National Cemetery is cracked on all four sides. The fault runs diagonally 1 1/2 times around the rectangular tomb, cutting through its classic facade, slicing the three laurel wreaths etched on two sides and marring the Greek relief figures of Peace, Victory and Valor carved into one end. The crack doesn't obscure the solemn inscription: "Here Rests In Honored Glory An American Soldier Known But To God."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lindsey McPherson | April 27, 2012
I almost quit watching this show tonight. And not just this episode but the entire "Vampire Diaries" series.   Why you ask? Because the writers almost killed off Alaric.   So back in her own body, Esther comes up with this plan for how to kill off her children and the entire vampire species. She decides to turn Alaric, while he's really his evil alter ego, into a vampire. She believes his hatred of vampires will only intensify when he's a vampire and he'll become an unstoppable vampire hunter, just like her husband Michael (though he was obviously stopped!
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | August 23, 2008
Francis C. Ehart, a retired stationery company executive and former longtime Linthicum Heights resident, died Tuesday of a cerebral hemorrhage at the Hospice of the Chesapeake in Harwood. He was 93. Mr. Ehart was born in Baltimore and raised on Marshall Street. He attended city public schools until the eighth grade and later earned his General Educational Development diploma while attending night school. In 1931, Mr. Ehart began working as an office boy for D.N. Owens & Co. Inc., a Baltimore business forms company located on Calvert Street.
FEATURES
October 30, 2007
Oct. 30 1961 The Soviet Party Congress unanimously approved a resolution ordering the removal of Josef Stalin's body from Lenin's tomb.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,Los Angeles Times | May 11, 2007
JERUSALEM -- For more than three decades, Israeli archaeologist Ehud Netzer scraped at the ancient man-made hillock. He searched the top. He dug at the bottom. Finally Netzer carved into the midsection and there, he claims, found his prize: the grave of Herod the Great. The evidence, in the form of shards of decorative stonework that may have been a coffin and pieces of a structure thought to have been the mausoleum, is still far from ironclad proof. Archaeologists have not found a body.
TRAVEL
By Mary Schmich and Mary Schmich,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 10, 2006
NEW ORLEANS / / The little band of cemetery tourists couldn't resist the delicate, ghoulish question: After Hurricane Katrina, did any of the bodies float? It was a humid, gray autumn day in New Orleans, almost cool, and our tour group had meandered through the French Quarter, past the "Make Levees Not War" banners, across alcoholically aromatic Bourbon Street, and finally over to Basin Street and St. Louis Cemetery No. 1. "You'd have been ankle deep in water here," our guide had said, pointing to the waterline, a shadowy gray stripe on the white paint along a cemetery wall.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | October 27, 2006
A team of Johns Hopkins University archaeologists digging in northern Syria this past summer found a 4,000-year-old tomb filled with human and animal remains, along with gold and silver artifacts. The tomb, one of at least eight at the site, is believed to be part of a royal cemetery in the ancient city of Tuba, one of Syria's first settlements and the capital of a small kingdom, according to Glenn Schwartz, a Hopkins professor of Near Eastern studies. The newly discovered tombs contain signs of ritual sacrifice, including the skeletons of infants and decapitated donkeys, as well as puppy bones, Schwartz said.
NEWS
By John Noble Wilford and John Noble Wilford,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 15, 2000
A 4,300-year-old tomb excavated this summer at the site of an ancient city in Syria has the discovering archaeologists excited but deeply puzzled. The arrangement of the bodies, accompanied by gold, bronze and ceramic grave goods, seems to defy ready explanation. The archaeologists found the bodies laid out on three levels. On the top were the skeletons of two young women, each with a baby at her side. The women were richly adorned head to toe in pendants, bracelets and other jewelry of gold, silver and lapis lazuli.
FEATURES
October 30, 2007
Oct. 30 1961 The Soviet Party Congress unanimously approved a resolution ordering the removal of Josef Stalin's body from Lenin's tomb.
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
NEW YORK // The man accused of stripping Italy of precious antiquities and selling them on the world art market for millions of dollars now shuffles along East 69th Street by himself, his head bowed, and seems as threatening as a glass of warm milk. He's 87 years old and can barely open a door without assistance. But Italian authorities say this man -- Robert E. Hecht Jr., a Baltimore native whose great-grandfather founded the department store that bears his name -- was for decades at the center of a criminal ring that dug antiquities from Italian soil and sold them to museums and collectors around the world.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
A hundred years ago tomorrow, President Theodore Roosevelt, along with a host of Cabinet members, congressmen and officials from the French and American navies, hosted one of the grandest events Annapolis has ever seen: the state funeral of John Paul Jones. Thousands filled the streets, eager for a good seat near the U.S. Naval Academy armory, where amid somber music, dignitary after dignitary paid tribute to Jones' heroism. Ever since, Jones - considered the father of the American Navy and a Revolutionary War hero - has been entombed at the military college.
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