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NEWS
July 21, 2010
Whatever happened to a Maryland-grown tomato that tastes like a tomato? When did Maryland farmers decide it was better to provide a near-perfect looking tomato than a tomato with real taste? I miss tomatoes grown by farmers that taste like a Maryland-grown tomato. The ones you thickly cut and enjoyed on a BLT or, the ultimate Maryland pleasure, a lettuce, tomato, mayo and soft crab sandwich. The tomatoes you buy today in farmers' markets are perfect round, red-globed beauties with texture and taste not much better than the ones available at the grocery store during the winter.
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Over the summer, Harbor East favorite Pazo shifted its focus from Spanish food to Italian, featuring dishes like this spicy lobster pasta. Pairing freshly cooked lobster with Fresno chili-spiked tomato sauce, Chef Julian Marucci creates a fabulous special occasion dish that's easy to re-create at home. Marucci makes good use of the whole lobster, incorporating the cooked shells to create stock that infuses tomato sauce with the crustacean's unique flavor. The addition of hot Fresno pepper gives the sauce extra -- and welcome -- verve.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 11, 2013
Anne Kilmurray from Pottsville, Pa., was looking for a recipe for tomato jelly or tomato preserves. She used to have an old recipe of her mother's but she has misplaced it and the farmers' market in her area used to sell a good one but no longer does. She said all she can remember about her mother's recipe is that it contained lemon peel. Kay Shultz from Ellicott City shared her mother's recipe for making homemade tomato preserves. She said that her mother would core the tomatoes and include the seeds but that she removes most of the seeds when she makes it now. She added lemon peel to her version and she said she always loves to eat the peel after opening the jar. No store-bought tomato preserves can compare with one made from tomatoes from your garden or local farmers' market.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
In the 12 years since it was designated an Arts & Entertainment District by the state government, Baltimore's Station North has blossomed. The amalgam of neighborhoods just north of Pennsylvania Station has become a destination for all things artsy and one of the city's hottest food areas. Bottega, a tiny BYOB that opened last year in the western corner of the district, is one of the restaurants attracting foodie crowds - and for good reason. The ever-changing menu, inspired by Tuscan flavors, manages to be creative without pretense.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013
Viola Brown from La Pointe, Ind., was looking for a good and easy recipe for making tomato basil soup. She said she is 82 years old and has a hard time finding things she still likes to eat. It's not surprising that she would be in search of a recipe for homemade tomato soup, as it's a classic comfort food no matter what the season. Jenny Garcia from Santa Rosa, Calif., shared a recipe that she and her husband came up with that she said was inspired by a similar recipe in the Barefoot Contessa Cookbook.
NEWS
October 7, 2013
As I contemplate the state of my government with sadness and anger, what a treat it was to read Susan Reimer 's article on heirloom tomatoes ( "They aren't heirloom unless your grandmother gave them to you," Oct. 2). My husband and I have been relishing these gems for the past two months. Eating an heirloom tomato on fresh bread slathered with mayonnaise will bring joy to the hardest of hearts. One realizes that there is something greater out there that transcends the mundane.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | July 23, 2010
There is no summer experience quite like a stop at your favorite roadside stand for Maryland tomatoes and corn. This week, we stopped on Route 16 in Caroline County, a few miles short of Denton, and filled a car. In the four days following, I polished off a whole watermelon. The stop reminded me of the day my brother Eddie decided to set up his own little market on the boardwalk at Rehoboth Beach, Del. It was about 50 years ago, in the days when families spent entire summers at the ocean.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 26, 2003
What's the correct way to rehydrate sun-dried tomatoes? Previously, I just soaked them in water and used them in my recipe, but they tasted bitter -- not at all like the sweet, juicy, plump tomatoes I've tasted in restaurant dishes. Thanks for your help. Unless you buy your sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil, they will need to be rehydrated with liquid. A rule of thumb is to cover sun-dried tomatoes with warm water and soak for two hours at room temperature. You can get a feel for how long they should soak by feeling how flexible they are -- the stiffer they are, the longer they should soak.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
"So, it looks like Farmer Emma is offering some extra tomatoes this week at the CSA," I said to my husband. "Can you grab a few while you are picking up our share at Moon Valley?" I kind of wish I had read Emma Williams' email to our CSA group a little more closely. In addition to our quart of tomatoes (and loads of vegetables), she was offering everyone another five pounds of tomatoes. I didn't realize how many that was until they were sitting in a colander on the kitchen countertop.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
How can I keep squirrels off my tomatoes? A very simple old-fashioned way to discourage animals, including deer, from taking a bite out of your tomatoes is to sprinkle a little lime on the fruits. Use powdered agricultural lime. It washes off easily when you harvest. You'll have to reapply after rains, so don't overdo the lime because you don't want to raise your soil pH too high. This method also can be useful on a short term basis to keep deer from eating foliage. My hedge has gotten completely bare at the bottom over the years.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
According to the frost/freeze chart on the Home and Garden Information Center website, I'm thinking that if I cover my tomatoes with row cover or something during light freezes, I can have sun-ripened tomatoes into November. Will this work? Fortunately, tomatoes do not need to ripen on the vine to have good flavor. At the end of the growing season, tomato plants fade as days shorten, sunlight weakens and temperatures drop. But long before a hard frost hits, the tomato fruits start exhibiting poor flavor and texture, plus uneven ripening or blotches.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
A family-owned produce distributor has moved from Washington to a new base in Jessup, where its 80 employees work to package and transport more than 1 million pounds of tomatoes each week. Pete Pappas & Sons Inc., founded in 1942 in Washington as a tomato distributor, started operations in August at its 120,000-square-foot warehouse in Jessup, said Paul S. Pappas, general manager for the firm, which is in its fourth generation of family ownership. The larger property will allow the firm to expand into new types of produce from its tomato and berries, he said.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
All of the leaves on some of my tomato plants have curled down, except a few twisted in all directions. They were growing great for a while. It looks contagious because they're all together. What is this? Tomato plants are like canaries in the coal mine when it comes to herbicide injury. They are super sensitive to the chemical 2,4-D and its family of growth-regulating herbicides, including clopyralid. Twisted growth is a classic symptom. Most likely an herbicide sprayed in your area was carried by wind and drifted onto the tomato plants.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Last year, all my tomatoes (all the same kind) ripened all at once and then I didn't get any more. How can I get tomatoes all season? You may have planted a variety of determinate tomato that was not a long producer. Determinate tomatoes grow to a set size and stop, however they usually produce over a long period. (Indeterminate tomatoes, on the other hand, continue to put out new growth all summer.) Your tomatoes also may have stopped fruiting because their location became too hot. When day and night temperatures are very hot, plants overheat and stop flowering and fruiting.
NEWS
January 13, 2014
When the rent or the price of tomatoes goes up, business owners either absorb the increase or pass it on to their customers. If that item causes the business to close, you can be sure that other problems exist. However, if there is a suggestion of an increase in the minimum wage, we are deluged by promises that it will cause vast unemployment and rampant business closures ("O'Malley backs indexing of minimum wage," Jan. 8). But here's the rub. It's hard to find good tomatoes but easy to find desperate people who will work for low wages.
NEWS
October 7, 2013
As I contemplate the state of my government with sadness and anger, what a treat it was to read Susan Reimer 's article on heirloom tomatoes ( "They aren't heirloom unless your grandmother gave them to you," Oct. 2). My husband and I have been relishing these gems for the past two months. Eating an heirloom tomato on fresh bread slathered with mayonnaise will bring joy to the hardest of hearts. One realizes that there is something greater out there that transcends the mundane.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
According to the frost/freeze chart on the Home and Garden Information Center website, I'm thinking that if I cover my tomatoes with row cover or something during light freezes, I can have sun-ripened tomatoes into November. Will this work? Fortunately, tomatoes do not need to ripen on the vine to have good flavor. At the end of the growing season, tomato plants fade as days shorten, sunlight weakens and temperatures drop. But long before a hard frost hits, the tomato fruits start exhibiting poor flavor and texture, plus uneven ripening or blotches.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2011
Nicole Sherry, head groundskeeper at Camden Yards, was a 13-year-old growing up in Delaware when the legendary Pasquale "Pat" Santarone, who had a similar job for 23 seasons at Memorial Stadium, announced his retirement two months before Opening Day 1991. Santarone, considered one of the leading groundskeepers in the country during his career, had learned the business from his immigrant Italian father, Val, groundskeeper at Elmira, N.Y., then a Double-A-Orioles affiliate, as a 7-year-old cutting grass.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 2, 2013
Today we revisit one of my favorite topics. Tomatoes. I bet you thought I was going to write about the government shutdown, but giving Congress ink is like giving a fool a microphone. So let's talk about tomatoes. I went to my favorite farmers' market in Annapolis this weekend and greedily filled my basket. I am hoarding against the possibility that a sudden storm will arrive and, although we need the rain, cause the last tomatoes in the field to swell and split and rot. The drought actually has been a boon to us tomato lovers.
NEWS
September 10, 2013
It was excellent that readers could see that experts say smoothies and fruit drinks could sabotage their healthy diets ("Debate swirls over juicing," Sept. 5). Doctors have known this for years. I've told hundreds of patients that I have a pound of tomatoes and a pound of celery in the blender every day. My "V2" has no added sodium like purchased V8. A tomato carries seeds and follows a flower on the vine, so it is a fruit. It has more potassium and less calories than bananas, pound for pound.
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