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By Kit Waskom Pollard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Over the summer, Harbor East favorite Pazo shifted its focus from Spanish food to Italian, featuring dishes like this spicy lobster pasta. Pairing freshly cooked lobster with Fresno chili-spiked tomato sauce, Chef Julian Marucci creates a fabulous special occasion dish that's easy to re-create at home. Marucci makes good use of the whole lobster, incorporating the cooked shells to create stock that infuses tomato sauce with the crustacean's unique flavor. The addition of hot Fresno pepper gives the sauce extra -- and welcome -- verve.
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By Kit Waskom Pollard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Over the summer, Harbor East favorite Pazo shifted its focus from Spanish food to Italian, featuring dishes like this spicy lobster pasta. Pairing freshly cooked lobster with Fresno chili-spiked tomato sauce, Chef Julian Marucci creates a fabulous special occasion dish that's easy to re-create at home. Marucci makes good use of the whole lobster, incorporating the cooked shells to create stock that infuses tomato sauce with the crustacean's unique flavor. The addition of hot Fresno pepper gives the sauce extra -- and welcome -- verve.
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NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
When fresh tomatoes are abundant this summer - and we have consumed all we can in salads, on sandwiches, grilled and in salsas before their beauty fades - we will long to make tomato sauce. But there's a problem: For a classic lusty red pasta sauce, chefs actually tend to prefer canned tomatoes, says Richard Stuthmann, chief of instruction at Baltimore International College. Fresh tomatoes "aren't consistent," says Stuthmann, "and they aren't the red color we expect." So take a middle ground and combine the bounty of the farmers' market and the garden with tomato paste to make a quick marinara.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Sheila Hunter of Severna Park was hoping someone would have the recipe for a one-dish baked pasta entree that does not require cooking the pasta first. She said the recipe was printed on the label of a pasta sauce (she doesn't recall which one) back in the 1990s. Hunter hasn't been able to find the pasta sauce in stores for a long time and did not write down the recipe because she always just followed the directions on the jar. She said the dish was easy and made a tasty hot main dish that could feed a family of five.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 3, 2002
Of the 101 menu items at Champps Americana, all but six are made from scratch by chefs. "Our pride is our scratch kitchen," says Robert Glen, general manager of Champps Americana, one of the new restaurants that opened recently adjacent to The Mall in Columbia. Champps' menu features American cuisine, and the restaurant offers "upscale casual dining," according to Glen. Appetizers include Crab Bread (French bread layered with spicy crab salad and a blend of cheeses, baked and served with a side of marinara)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | November 22, 2006
This Australian red wine offers quality far beyond its price and is well worth acquiring - or giving - by the case. It's a full-bodied, smooth-textured shiraz with ample flavors of blackberry, plum, chocolate and herbs. Its complexity equals that of many wines three times its price. This screw-cap-equipped wine is ready to drink now and should keep for at least three years. Serve with red meat, pasta with tomato sauce.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | February 20, 2002
Rosenblum Cellars California Zinfandel, Vintners Cuvee XXIII ($16). Zinfandel rules for the second straight week. It's a good rut to be in when you're tasting wines like this nonvintage red from one of California's most reliable zin-masters. It's a lush, deep, meaty wine with plenty of blackberry, black currant, licorice, coffee and spicy oak flavors. Serve with just about any red-meat dish, pizza or pasta with tomato sauce.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2006
William Hierstitter of Cumberland wanted to find an old recipe for Hungarian Pot Roast made using Hunt's brand tomato sauce. Mary Wood of Fayetteville, N.C., responded with this recipe from the Hunt's Complete Tomato Sauce Book, a 1976 Hunt-Wesson Foods Inc. supermarket edition produced by Rutledge Books. The recipe called for tomato sauce with mushrooms. I was unable to find that in my local market, so I used regular Hunt's tomato sauce and added 1/2 cup of sliced fresh mushrooms, which worked just fine.
FEATURES
By Joyce Gemperlein and Joyce Gemperlein,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 1, 1996
It's nothing more than a dressed-up piece of bread, but pizza has become America's national dish. It's filling, fast and versatile enough to satisfy anyone -- even children who refuse to eat anything else.The old standby pepperoni-cheese-mushroom pizza now shares the limelight with so-called designer pizza, for which California is generally credited. We have pesto; smoked chicken; all manner of cheese ranging from blue to goat; refried bean and salsa; and countless other versions.These days, if you can put it on bread, you can call it pizza.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 30, 2008
The nostalgic satisfaction of meatloaf eludes many of us during the busy workweek because the soul-soothing comfort food takes so darn long to bake. But what about meatballs instead? The form lends itself to limitless flavor combinations. This version gets a Spanish flair from smoked paprika, which provides great depth of flavor. The meatballs are simmered in a little red wine and tomato sauce. Choose an inexpensive Rioja to cook with to keep the theme going. Menu Smoked Paprika Turkey Meatballs Spanish rice Glazed carrots Flan Smoked Paprika Turkey Meatballs Serves 4 -- Total time: 35 minutes 1 pound ground dark turkey meat 1 egg 1/4 red onion, chopped very fine 1/4 cup dry bread crumbs 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon sweet or spicy smoked Spanish paprika 6 sprigs parsley, minced 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 can (15 ounces)
NEWS
March 1, 2014
Dan Janssen has eaten pizza for almost every meal for a quarter of a century. Pizza for breakfast. Pizza for lunch. Pizza for dinner. And almost always, it's plain cheese pizza. "I do eat a bowl of Raisin Bran once a week or so if I want to be healthy," said Janssen, 38, of Ellicott City. "But usually it's just pizza and coffee. " Janssen said he ate a normal "meat-and-potatoes" diet when he was growing up, but decided to stop eating meat for ethical reasons when he was a young teenager.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013
From: Toscana, Italy Price: $13 Serve with: Pasta with tomato sauce, grilled burgers This medium-bodied Italian red shows plenty of the fine character of the sangiovese grape even though it doesn't carry the name of an exalted wine region. It's a floral wine with good, up-front black cherry fruit and an appealing spiciness. The vibrant acidity makes it a natural to serve with tomato-based sauces. It's a solid choice for near- and mid-term consumption. -- Michael Dresser
SPORTS
August 26, 2013
(Courtesy of Jenny Perez) 6 to 8 medium sized round zucchinis (You can use regular zucchinis just cut them in half and hollow out the center.) Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Wash the zucchinis. Cut the tops about one quarter inch thick. Using a melon baller or small spoon to hollow out the center, leaving a shell one quarter inch thick. Chop the center and reserve. Place the sliced-off tops and the zucchinis on a baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and salt and massage to coat the zucchinis.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | October 26, 2012
It is said that if you want really good Italian food, you should go to a restaurant where the chef is from Casablanca, Morocco. Nah, I made that up. But it could be a truism. The kitchen of Salute Ristorante Italiano, just over the Howard County line, in downtown Laurel, turns out some very, very good Italian fare indeed. The 53-seat storefront eatery at 504 Main St. has a theater as a neighbor, and a little bit beyond is a liquor store. This is important information, because although Salute doesn't have a liquor license, owners Abdellah and Meriem Kass invite you to bring whatever spirits you wish to accompany the dinner he prepares for you and she serves to you. My party of four recently visited Salute for dinner, since the restaurant is only open for the evening meal, except if you're planning a large private party at lunchtime.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
It's the Ravens' first home playoff game since 2007, and depending on the outcome of the Denver-New England game, it could be their last home game until next season. So let's make this tailgate count. Since the weather this weekend is predicted to be in the 30s, you'll want something to chase off the chill. That's where the meatball sub comes in. It's easy to make at home and assemble in the parking lot - or at home, if that's where you'll be watching. Meatball subs Makes 10 six-inch subs Prep and cooking time: 11/2 hours Meatball ingredients: Makes 20 2-ounce meatballs 1 ounce extra virgin olive oil 1/2 medium yellow onion, minced 5 cloves of garlic 1 pound ground beef 1 pound mild Italian sausage (casing removed)
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2009
When it first opened back in 2006, I visited and enjoyed myself at Carlos O'Charlies. I remember being impressed first of all with how big the place was: two floors of shifting environments, several bars and multiple dining areas. Downstairs, there was a dance floor and a few pool tables; upstairs, more formal dining spaces; and in the center, a stone fountain. It didn't all make perfect sense, and it was hard to imagine its ever being full of diners, but its flamboyance put a smile on your face.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013
From: Toscana, Italy Price: $13 Serve with: Pasta with tomato sauce, grilled burgers This medium-bodied Italian red shows plenty of the fine character of the sangiovese grape even though it doesn't carry the name of an exalted wine region. It's a floral wine with good, up-front black cherry fruit and an appealing spiciness. The vibrant acidity makes it a natural to serve with tomato-based sauces. It's a solid choice for near- and mid-term consumption. -- Michael Dresser
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2002
Marlene Coleman of Baltimore requested a recipe that she had in the late '60s. "It was for pork chops and I believe it was called Skillet Barbecued Pork Chops. It had chopped celery and onions, some spices plus tomato sauce. I lost the recipe in moving and my family loved it." Marcy Curtiss of Pasadena responded. "I have had it for many years, and my family always loved it. Hope it is the one Ms. Coleman is looking for. I believe the recipe was from a label on a can of Hunt's tomato sauce."
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2009
B.J. Thompson of St Augustine, Fla., was looking for a recipe she had lost for Italian chili that was made with sausage and pepperoni in place of ground beef. Rosemary Grantly of Knoxville, Tenn., sent in a chili recipe that she thinks may be close to what Thompson is in search of. She says that it is easy to make and a nice departure from the traditional-style chili. She also says that practically every time she makes this chili for others, she is asked for the recipe. I tested her recipe using a jar of spicy tomato and basil sauce which, with the addition of the spices, gave the chili a nice kick.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | March 18, 2009
This year, more than others, we've declared war on wasting food. To help with the fight, we've come up with 20 ingredients that can be hard to use up before they go bad. Here are quick (and a few not-so-quick) ideas for putting them to delicious purpose. Keep the list on your fridge, and hopefully you'll never have to toss half a container of these staples again. When in doubt, turn to our quintet of favorite use-up dishes: frittata, fried rice, omelet, stir-fries, soup. They can take on many of the ingredients on our list.
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