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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
Alex Turner has a writer's eye. The Arctic Monkeys' singer-songwriter pens lyrics full of biting wit and pointed remarks. On "Reckless Serenade," a track from his band's recently released fourth album, he sings of the "type of kisses where teeth collide" before his narrator sadly retreats, singing, "Called up to listen to the voice of reason and got his answering machine. " His perspective, both humorous and earnest, stands out in modern-day rock. So where does the 25-year-old from Sheffield, England, draw inspiration?
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
Alex Turner has a writer's eye. The Arctic Monkeys' singer-songwriter pens lyrics full of biting wit and pointed remarks. On "Reckless Serenade," a track from his band's recently released fourth album, he sings of the "type of kisses where teeth collide" before his narrator sadly retreats, singing, "Called up to listen to the voice of reason and got his answering machine. " His perspective, both humorous and earnest, stands out in modern-day rock. So where does the 25-year-old from Sheffield, England, draw inspiration?
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FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | September 18, 1992
A large, enthusiastic gathering of Washington and Lee University alumni, parents and friends is expected at the kick-off party for the school's Baltimore Area Campaign Thursday at the Walters Art Gallery. Baltimore alums A. C. Hubbard Jr. and Joe Keelty are co-chairing the home team's part in a $129 million fund-raising campaign, with help from Tom Broadus Jr., J. Hardin Marion, Dick O'Connell and Bill Clements II.Washington and Lee president John Wilson will join party goers for a tour of the popular Walters exhibit, "The Gates of Mystery, the Art of Holy Russia," before joining emcee Tom Wolfe for the evening's program.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
If Stanley McChrystal has any kind of mordant humor, surely the song playing in his head these days is that old tune by Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show, the one about "the thrill that'll get-cha when you get your pict-cha on the cover of the Rolling Stone." That's actually Lady Gaga on the current cover, nearly naked but for an undergarment that gives "bullet bra" a whole new meaning. But somehow McChrystal has managed to upstage her even though he only makes an oblique appearance in the vicinity of her left knee, in a teaser headline, "Obama's General: Why he's losing the war."
FEATURES
By James Warren and James Warren,Chicago Tribune | January 4, 1991
IT SEEMS LIKE shooting fish in a barrel. But Tom Wolfe, who has taken on astronauts, radical chic politics, race relations and the art world, now confronts joggers and the quest for youth.The January M Inc. includes Clay Felker, its editor at large, interviewing the astringently conservative social commentator on the "hidden meaning in men's clothes." Somewhat inelegantly, Wolfe stumbles into the subject of jogging and our society's passionate efforts to turn back the clock."I don't think we worship youth, we worship youthfulness and, increasingly, eternal life," says Wolfe, who contends that part of the 1980s' money-craving fever reflected a belief among many males that if "they were very highly successful, they would also not have to die."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 22, 2000
For 35 years, Tom Wolfe has been stripping naked the pompous and pretentious, though I believe that's far from his most important accomplishment. He comes now with a book of essays, journalism and a novella. "Hooking Up" (Farrar, Straus Giroux, 293 pages, $25) is setting much of the U.S. High Literature establishment calling for his head. His opening chapter, the title piece, in a mere 11 pages presents a neat, broadly informed sweep of the state of the United States in the year 2000. It's better than any other such summing up I have read.
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | November 30, 1996
NEW YORK -- The wait for a new novel from Tom Wolfe willhave lasted 10 years -- until next November -- when his publisher brings out the writer's first hardcover fiction since the popular "Bonfire of the Vanities."Meanwhile, Wolfe is offering an appetizer in the pages of Rolling Stone, where "Bonfire" first appeared as a 27-part "serial novel," and his book publisher has offered a few other details of the much-anticipated work."Ambush at Fort Bragg," a tale of sensationalistic TV reporting that debuts in the Dec. 12 issue of Rolling Stone, was spun off by Wolfe from his novel-in-progress.
NEWS
By GARY DORSEY and GARY DORSEY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 1995
The New Journalism, the argument goes, is not new. To read H.L. Mencken's reports from the Scopes Monkey Trial filed from Dayton, Tenn., in July 1925, is to hear the same satiric inflection that Tom Wolfe intoned over the Sixties' Drug Culture ("The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test," 1968), Radical Chic ("Radical Chic & Mau Mauing the Flak Catchers," 1970), the Me Decade ("Mauve Gloves & Madmen, Clutter & Vine," 1976), and modern architecture ("Bauhaus to Our House," 1981).The terms wit, prejudices and hatred of hypocrisy of Menken could just as easily apply to Mr. Wolfe's collected works, the first of which, The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby, was published 30 years ago.The difference, however, between the old and new is significant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Helene Stapinski and Helene Stapinski,Special to the Sun | November 14, 2004
Like Charlotte Simmons, the flawed young heroine of Tom Wolfe's new novel, I arrived at college a straight A student, socially inferior to the sorority girls around me, and in search of my identity. It was in a journalism class where I began to define the person I would become. In that class, the teacher assigned us an anthology entitled The New Journalism. The collection was edited by Tom Wolfe. Living and breathing in this book were Truman Capote, Joan Didion and, of course, Wolfe himself.
NEWS
By James Rainey and James Rainey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 3, 1999
It has been nearly 2,000 years since sober men in togas gathered at Rome's central market, coaching each other to put aside worldly wants and walk a straight and moral path. Now -- in a time of presidential hanky-panky, 24-hour entertainment and murky social values -- their ancient creed is being resurrected.Stoicism is back for a small but growing group of adherents, thanks to the unlikely convergence of America's most biting chronicler of pop culture and one of its most celebrated Vietnam War prisoners.
NEWS
July 29, 2007
The Emperor's Children By Claire Messud A robust, canny and surprisingly searching novel told with a light-handed irony that is, by turns, as measured as Edith Wharton's and as cutting as Tom Wolfe's. Messud, in her fourth novel, selected as one of the best of 2006 by many reviewers, is wickedly observant of pretensions - intellectual, sexual, class and gender.
FEATURES
By STEVEN BARRIE-ANTHONY and STEVEN BARRIE-ANTHONY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- Tom Wolfe is screaming. He screams softly, this Southern gentleman, his trademark white suit unwrinkled, his spats unwavering even as a giant granite boulder hurtles down upon him. It looks to be the end of the pioneering New Journalism author of The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. "Aaaaaaaahh! Wait, no, that wasn't good, let me start over." "How did you scream last time a boulder was hurtling toward you?" asks Carolyn Omine, executive producer of The Simpsons. "Why don't you try, `Aaaaahhhh, my suit!
NEWS
By JANET MASLIN and JANET MASLIN,THE NEW YORK TIMES | December 11, 2005
The Gang That Wouldn't Write Straight Marc Weingarten Crown / 325 pages In The Gang That Wouldn't Write Straight, his survey of what used to warrant the name New Journalism, Marc Weingarten demonstrates two things clearly. The first: There is no substitute for reading the classics of this genre firsthand. The second: The writers who are commonly lumped together in this category didn't have that much in common after all. "Was it a movement?" Weingarten asks about the explosion of dramatically personal nonfiction that arose in the 1960s and broke all the old rules.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | September 21, 2005
Before she could even read, she remembers, her mother, Jenna Welch of Midland, Texas, lulled her to sleep many a night by reading aloud from Little Women. This summer, she made her way through three biographies, an epic on life in the Ukraine, and Marilynne Robinson's newest novel, Gilead, in which a 77-year-old preacher recounts his life and times for his 7-year-old son. For Laura Bush, reading has always offered links to the past, a passage to worlds unknown, and a way of coming home again - a ticket to a richer life.
FEATURES
By Robin Abcarian | September 20, 2005
Pitch a book by its cover? You bet. The paperback publisher of Tom Wolfe's unevenly reviewed latest novel I Am Charlotte Simmons is hoping that a redesigned cover -- and a youth-oriented marketing campaign, complete with a contest featuring a trip to Cancun -- will help draw young adults to the book, mocked by some reviewers who found the septuagenarian author's accounts of campus sex life unconvincing. Oddly, the cover of the paperback omits the name of the novel. "Big publicity and marketing campaigns for big authors are to be expected," said Michael Cader, the editor of two industry publications, Publishers Marketplace and Publishers Lunch.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2004
We admit it: We were wrong about a lot this year. Big Media, professional prognosticators, the loud guy at the water cooler: We dissected the Howard Dean phenomenon, only to hear it drowned out by one scream. Weren't mortgage rates supposed to zoom up? Don't even talk to us about exit polls. And, of course, some people are still looking for the weapons of mass destruction. While we were looking the other way, some news came at us like Curt Schilling's fastball. Who expected that the pitcher and his fellow Boston Red Sox would battle back from the edge of elimination by the usually indomitable Yankees to finally break the Bambino's Curse?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN BOOK EDITOR | May 20, 2001
Since the mid-1960s, Tom Wolfe has anatomically dissected U.S. institutions ranging from the space program to stock car racing, from the pomposities of limousine radicals to the postmodernist high-art market, from urban grub politics to Olympian venture capitalism. And more, lots more. None of those books has failed to yield, cooing on one flank, a righteous chorus of admirers who believe Wolfe has the clearest grasp of the American social fabric of anyone writing. Gnashing at the other flank is a pack of condemners balefully keening he is dead, wise-guy, reactionary wrong.
FEATURES
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN BOOK EDITOR | November 29, 1998
It's Friday the 13th, and Tom Wolfe is dressed in camouflage.His double-breasted blazer, dark as midnight, blends with the garb of some 600 psychiatrists and psychologists who have gathered in Baltimore for a two-day symposium honoring the chief of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University.In 35 years, Wolfe has rarely been seen out of his signature, monochrome uniform: perfectly tailored three-piece suit, tightly tabbed collar, black-and-white faux-spats shoes. But on this day in November he is dressed to fade into the crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Helene Stapinski and Helene Stapinski,Special to the Sun | November 14, 2004
Like Charlotte Simmons, the flawed young heroine of Tom Wolfe's new novel, I arrived at college a straight A student, socially inferior to the sorority girls around me, and in search of my identity. It was in a journalism class where I began to define the person I would become. In that class, the teacher assigned us an anthology entitled The New Journalism. The collection was edited by Tom Wolfe. Living and breathing in this book were Truman Capote, Joan Didion and, of course, Wolfe himself.
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