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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- They were supposed to have taken over the sport after winning each of the first three major championships last year. Twentysomethings named Tiger Woods, Ernie Els and Justin Leonard were supposed to have made the thirtysomethings and fortysomethings and one notable fiftysomething golfer insignificant.And then something happened.The older guys rebelled.First Davis Love, a 34-year-old purist who had held onto his persimmon driver until last year, won his first major title at the PGA Championship at Winged Foot last August.
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SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | August 7, 2009
Tom Watson, the craggy-faced legend who came within an 8-foot putt of winning a major championship at age 59, remains an inspiration for senior golfers everywhere. Count John Howson among his most fervent admirers. Howson, 50, a vice president of engineering for Black & Decker's DeWalt division in Towson and one of the best amateur players in the state, is gearing up to play in the big Middle Atlantic Amateur Golf Championship at Four Streams Country Club in Beallsville in October. But he's still buzzing from his performance in the U.S. Senior Open last weekend, where he finally got to meet Watson just weeks after Watson electrified the golf world by nearly becoming the oldest player to win the British Open in Turnberry, Scotland.
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NEWS
By Photos by Kenneth K. Lam and Photos by Kenneth K. Lam,Sun photographer | October 8, 2007
Thousands of golf fans watched as more than 70 players, including Tom Watson, Fuzzy Zoeller, Tom Kite and Curtis Strange competed in the Constellation Energy Senior Players Championship at the Baltimore Country Club. It was the first major professional event to be held at the Timonium course since the 1988 U.S. Women's Open. As part of an agreement with the PGA Tour, it will be an annual event through 2011.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | July 22, 2009
The British Open has been over for a couple of days, and Tom Watson is probably home taking a blowtorch to his 8-iron, but I'm still sitting exactly in the same position I was when he overshot the green at 18 and came up just short of what would have been one of the most amazing feats in the history of professional sports. I'd like to say I'm still sitting here in front of the television in disbelief, waiting for one of the SportsCenter replays to show he actually made that 9-foot putt on the 72nd hole of the tournament.
SPORTS
By Jaime Diaz and Jaime Diaz,New York Times News Service | July 19, 1991
SOUTHPORT, England -- Seeking the crowning glory to his recent comeback, Seve Ballesteros weaved his way through the wind-swept sand dunes of Royal Birkdale until a finishing surge carried him into the first-round lead yesterday at the 120th British Open.With a steady 25-mph wind blowing off the adjacent Irish Sea, the 34-year-old Spaniard played with a consummate control that never has been the hallmark of his game, particularly in recent years.But on the final two holes, the swashbuckler in Ballesteros took over as he eagled the par-5 17th and made a 45-foot birdie putt on the 18th for a round of 4-under-par 66.It was one better than the 67s shot by Santiago Luna, also of Spain, Martin Gates of England and Chip Beck of the United States.
SPORTS
By Dan Hruby and Dan Hruby,Knight-Ridder | June 18, 1992
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. -- The U.S. Golf Association is convinced that Pebble Beach is primed for the assault of 156 of the world's finest players in the 92nd national Open, which started its 72-hole run early today.And most of the 156 players are just hoping the USGA hasn't overdone it."This is a very hard golf course," said Tom Watson, who captured the last Open (1982) played over the same terrain. "These are the smallest greens we play. They're firm and a little bumpy -- you won't see many putts go in."
SPORTS
By Larry Dorman and Larry Dorman,New York Times News Service | February 7, 1994
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. -- There is always something of an unreal sense at Pebble Beach, a sort of vaguely mystic quality to the golf and the surroundings.But old Pebble Beach has never been as mysterious and dreamlike as yesterday when, out of the mists of time, a retired golfer stepped up and won the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am.Johnny Miller, 46, playing in just his fifth tournament since 1990, reappeared yesterday like some specter from another era. He then beat his nerves and he beat Tom Watson down the stretch to capture his first tournament victory since he won at Pebble Beach seven years ago."
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2005
Hale Irwin is out, but Tom Kite has been added to a Constellation Energy Classic field that includes 20 of the top 25 money-winners on the Champions Tour. Irwin notched his 43rd victory among the 50-and-over set Sunday, at the First Tee Open at Pebble Beach. After competing three straight weeks on the Champion Tour's just-concluded West Coast swing, the most successful player in tour history notified local organizers late Monday that a sore back would prohibit him from coming to Baltimore.
SPORTS
August 19, 1991
CASTLE ROCK, Colo. -- Jose-Maria Olazabal took a page from Seve Ballesteros' book and a romp around the woods and hills on his way to a victory yesterday in The International.Just as his more famous countryman did so often in establishing a worldwide reputation, Olazabal turned potential disaster into the birdie that made him a winner on the American tour for the second time in a year.Olazabal, a 25-year-old Spaniard who will defend his title in the World Series of Golf next week in Akron, Ohio, won this one by three points under the modified Stableford scoring system used for this unique event.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2002
The 2002 U.S. Senior Open brought big names and big crowds and a big-time golf setting to Caves Valley Golf Club in Owings Mills. The event had a little of everything, but for much of yesterday's final round, there seemed to be an ingredient missing from this recipe. Drama. Don Pooley and Tom Watson more than made up for that. After Watson climbed back from a five-stroke deficit in the last 10 holes of regulation, he and Pooley clawed their way through a five-hole playoff that ended when Pooley made an 8-foot putt on the second hole of sudden death.
NEWS
By Photos by Kenneth K. Lam and Photos by Kenneth K. Lam,Sun photographer | October 8, 2007
Thousands of golf fans watched as more than 70 players, including Tom Watson, Fuzzy Zoeller, Tom Kite and Curtis Strange competed in the Constellation Energy Senior Players Championship at the Baltimore Country Club. It was the first major professional event to be held at the Timonium course since the 1988 U.S. Women's Open. As part of an agreement with the PGA Tour, it will be an annual event through 2011.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun reporter | September 17, 2006
Don Pooley was born in Phoenix, played for the University of Arizona and makes his home in Tucson. That doesn't sound like an ideal background for a mudder, but nothing brings out the best in Pooley like a visit to Baltimore's brand of sea level. Pooley, whose signature golf victory came in the 2002 U.S. Senior Open at Caves Valley, thrived on a soggy second day of the Constellation Energy Classic, as he shot an 8-under-par 64 that moved him to 10-under and gave him a one-stroke lead heading into today's third and final round at Hayfields Country Club.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2006
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- The crowds stood 10-deep yesterday afternoon at Augusta National, watching legends and relative unknowns alike as they played one of the most beautiful golf courses in the world. It wasn't the 7,445-yard, par-72 monster that will begin to swallow up the field in the 70th Masters beginning today, but the 1,060-yard, par-3 course on which one of golf's most charming events takes place the day before the season's first major begins. It's the tournament that everyone loves to play and few, if any, want to win. Ever since the legendary Sam Snead won the inaugural par-3 tournament in 1960, nobody has gone on to win the main event come Sunday.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2005
Unlike the Champions Tour, Rick Rhoden wasn't idle last weekend. While the tour's top players took a week off before resuming their pursuit of points and position in the Charles Schwab Cup in the Constellation Energy Classic, Rhoden teed it up in Denver. On Sunday, the former baseball All-Star pitcher won his third consecutive John Elway Celebrity Classic, but he's had enough of beating the likes of Al Del Greco, Mickey Tettleton and Jack Marin in his second professional life. Playing on his third sponsor's exemption of the year, Rhoden was the first of the six men in at 68 in the first round of the CEC. He's not knocking being the best ever on the Celebrity Players Tour, but wants to be a regular on the Champions Tour.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2005
Hale Irwin is out, but Tom Kite has been added to a Constellation Energy Classic field that includes 20 of the top 25 money-winners on the Champions Tour. Irwin notched his 43rd victory among the 50-and-over set Sunday, at the First Tee Open at Pebble Beach. After competing three straight weeks on the Champion Tour's just-concluded West Coast swing, the most successful player in tour history notified local organizers late Monday that a sore back would prohibit him from coming to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2002
The 2002 U.S. Senior Open brought big names and big crowds and a big-time golf setting to Caves Valley Golf Club in Owings Mills. The event had a little of everything, but for much of yesterday's final round, there seemed to be an ingredient missing from this recipe. Drama. Don Pooley and Tom Watson more than made up for that. After Watson climbed back from a five-stroke deficit in the last 10 holes of regulation, he and Pooley clawed their way through a five-hole playoff that ended when Pooley made an 8-foot putt on the second hole of sudden death.
SPORTS
By Joe Concannon and Joe Concannon,Boston Globe | August 15, 1993
TOLEDO, Ohio -- There will be one more walk to the first tee at the Inverness Club for Greg Norman, barring a playoff in the evening hours today. When he arrived here for the PGA Championship in 1986, he had won his first major championship, the British Open at Turnberry in the west of Scotland. History bespeaks the rest of it, as Norman watched Bob Tway hole a sand wedge on the 72nd hole to win the championship.This time Norman heads into the final round of the PGA Championship in the lead again, fresh from a pulsating triumph in the British Open at Royal St. George's, where he exorcised all those demons that had haunted him for seven years.
TOPIC
By Mike Adams | December 12, 1999
IT'S HARD to imagine a more unlikely champion for America's working people than Pat Buchanan.Buchanan served as an adviser to pro-business presidents, Nixon and Reagan, and has spent most of his life as a Washington insider. But just pick up a newspaper or flick on the TV, and you'll find him shaking hands with beleaguered steel-workers or telling farmers and ranchers that they are "getting the shaft" because the U.S. government won't force other nations to open their markets.And recently, with images of the rioting in Seattle fresh in the public's memory, Buchanan told members of the Texas Reform Party that the protesters had "outed the World Trade Organization."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2002
FARMINGDALE, N.Y. - It didn't take long for Tiger Woods to be asked about next month's British Open and his pursuit of golf's Grand Slam. Shortly after Woods had finished the 102nd U.S. Open on Sunday night on the Black Course at Bethpage State Park, he was asked on national television about his trip to Muirfield, Scotland. It came up later in a news conference. "Right now, I could care less about it," Woods was saying about an hour after his three-shot victory over Phil Mickelson. "I'll be honest with you: I want to celebrate this one. It's going to be awhile before I start working on my links game."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2000
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Tom Watson talked in historical, if significantly exaggerated, terms. "Not as bad as the Bataan Death March, but close," Watson said after he came off the 18th green at Valhalla Golf Club last night. "Six hours kind of takes the starch out of you." Justin Leonard was a little more blunt. "It's pathetic," said Leonard. And Ernie Els had a suggestion.`They should see how it goes and maybe change the venue in the future," Els said. "That was ridiculous. I'm not saying they need to rethink the golf course, but they've got 150 guys playing a really tough course and they're not going to get them all."
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