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By PETER SCHMUCK | March 25, 2007
JUPITER, Fla. -- It was an odd scene, especially under the circumstances. Tom Trebelhorn, the Orioles' 59-year-old bench coach, was flat on the deck matching third baseman Melvin Mora push-up for push-up Wednesday while the rest of the team warmed up for an exhibition game against the St. Louis Cardinals. The fact that Trebelhorn was willing to engage a premier athlete 24 years his junior in a test of physical prowess, light-hearted as the contest was, would say a lot about the man even on his best day. The fact that he was in uniform at all at this juncture in his most difficult spring is a testament to the power of his particular form of positive thinking.
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By ROCH KUBATKO | October 30, 2007
It appears that the Orioles are more likely to announce a new first base coach and bench coach before revealing their choice for a new front office position. And as long as we're throwing out candidates for first base coach, we need to remember Moe Hill, who joined the major league staff in September after completing his second season at Double-A Bowie, and his fifth in the organization. Hill, who spent three years at Single-A Frederick, is a former outfielder who also happened to work with the outfielders at Bowie.
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SPORTS
By Joe Strauss | April 25, 1999
Scott Erickson -- DOWN -- For Dr. Death (0-4), spring training has bled into the regular season. Pitching on three days' rest was a hoped-for panacea.The A-Bomb -- DOWN -- The Orioles will pay $65 million over five years for Albert Belle's bat. How much more for some glove?Media coverage -- UP -- Sports Illustrated, ESPN, The Sporting News and the notorious "Baltimore media." They all want a piece of this team. The first three weeks prove that fact is stranger than fiction.Tom Trebelhorn -- UP -- Orioles minor-league director -- and former Milwaukee Brewers skipper -- is this week's manager-in-waiting.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 25, 2007
JUPITER, Fla. -- It was an odd scene, especially under the circumstances. Tom Trebelhorn, the Orioles' 59-year-old bench coach, was flat on the deck matching third baseman Melvin Mora push-up for push-up Wednesday while the rest of the team warmed up for an exhibition game against the St. Louis Cardinals. The fact that Trebelhorn was willing to engage a premier athlete 24 years his junior in a test of physical prowess, light-hearted as the contest was, would say a lot about the man even on his best day. The fact that he was in uniform at all at this juncture in his most difficult spring is a testament to the power of his particular form of positive thinking.
SPORTS
April 6, 1992
Tom Trebelhorn took part in all his old routines yesterday. He pitched batting practice, hit grounders and sprinted enthusiastically across the infield at Milwaukee County Stadium.The number on his back had changed since the last time he was on the field in September. He's now No. 41, not 42. And yesterday, he finally got a view of the stadium -- one he used to jog around -- from the opposing dugout.Six months after he was fired as manager of the Milwaukee Brewers, Trebelhorn returned as a bench coach with the Chicago Cubs.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | October 30, 2007
It appears that the Orioles are more likely to announce a new first base coach and bench coach before revealing their choice for a new front office position. And as long as we're throwing out candidates for first base coach, we need to remember Moe Hill, who joined the major league staff in September after completing his second season at Double-A Bowie, and his fifth in the organization. Hill, who spent three years at Single-A Frederick, is a former outfielder who also happened to work with the outfielders at Bowie.
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | October 13, 2005
On his first day without the "interim" tag attached to his name as Orioles manager, Sam Perlozzo had the status of one of his coaches foremost in mind. Orioles pitching coach Ray Miller had surgery yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital for an aneurysm below his heart. Miller, 60, came out of the surgery fine, team spokesman Bill Stetka said, and is expected to make a full recovery. The estimated recovery time is eight weeks, leaving his status with the team in question. But yesterday, that was the last thing on Perlozzo's mind.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1999
SARASOTA, Fla. -- The Orioles' minor-league system has been making strides in recent years under Syd Thrift. Now Thrift's successor, Tom Trebelhorn, plans to keep it moving upward. "One of the problems in the past is that they didn't have enough players. There was no depth and Syd had to act basically as a Triple-A general manager, signing a bunch of six-year free agents," said Trebelhorn. "But we are younger now and more athletically gifted, so it's easier for me." As the new director of player development, Trebelhorn will be able to spend less time on paperwork and scrambling for talent to buttress the Rochester roster.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1999
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- A Friday meeting that lasted almost six hours and included Ray Miller, his coaching staff and general manager Frank Wren reinforced the manager's opinion that all the differences with the Orioles this season have put everybody on the same page."
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1995
SARASOTA, Fla. -- If you have played baseball or softball, then you know all about running to first base. Easy, right? Hit the ball, fling the bat away -- without separating the catcher from his teeth -- and go like crazy down the line.Turns out it's far more complicated than that. Much more. Tom Trebelhorn, the former Milwaukee Brewers and Chicago Cubs manager hired by the Orioles to teach base running in spring training this year, has broken down the five-second sprint into increments.Twenty increments.
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | October 13, 2005
On his first day without the "interim" tag attached to his name as Orioles manager, Sam Perlozzo had the status of one of his coaches foremost in mind. Orioles pitching coach Ray Miller had surgery yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital for an aneurysm below his heart. Miller, 60, came out of the surgery fine, team spokesman Bill Stetka said, and is expected to make a full recovery. The estimated recovery time is eight weeks, leaving his status with the team in question. But yesterday, that was the last thing on Perlozzo's mind.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss | April 25, 1999
Scott Erickson -- DOWN -- For Dr. Death (0-4), spring training has bled into the regular season. Pitching on three days' rest was a hoped-for panacea.The A-Bomb -- DOWN -- The Orioles will pay $65 million over five years for Albert Belle's bat. How much more for some glove?Media coverage -- UP -- Sports Illustrated, ESPN, The Sporting News and the notorious "Baltimore media." They all want a piece of this team. The first three weeks prove that fact is stranger than fiction.Tom Trebelhorn -- UP -- Orioles minor-league director -- and former Milwaukee Brewers skipper -- is this week's manager-in-waiting.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1999
SARASOTA, Fla. -- The Orioles' minor-league system has been making strides in recent years under Syd Thrift. Now Thrift's successor, Tom Trebelhorn, plans to keep it moving upward. "One of the problems in the past is that they didn't have enough players. There was no depth and Syd had to act basically as a Triple-A general manager, signing a bunch of six-year free agents," said Trebelhorn. "But we are younger now and more athletically gifted, so it's easier for me." As the new director of player development, Trebelhorn will be able to spend less time on paperwork and scrambling for talent to buttress the Rochester roster.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1999
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- A Friday meeting that lasted almost six hours and included Ray Miller, his coaching staff and general manager Frank Wren reinforced the manager's opinion that all the differences with the Orioles this season have put everybody on the same page."
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1997
Tony Muser doesn't have an image problem. At this point, he doesn't have an image.The public-address announcer at Camden Yards introduced last night's opponent as "Bob Boone's Kansas City Royals," forgetting that Muser had taken over the club during the All-Star break. Never one to absorb the spotlight, Muser had gone unnoticed again.It figures that Muser, having failed in numerous attempts to become a manager in the big leagues, would get the chance when he wasn't even looking. He was in his first season as hitting coach with the Chicago Cubs, and his fifth season on their staff, when the Royals tabbed him as Boone's replacement.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1995
SARASOTA, Fla. -- If you have played baseball or softball, then you know all about running to first base. Easy, right? Hit the ball, fling the bat away -- without separating the catcher from his teeth -- and go like crazy down the line.Turns out it's far more complicated than that. Much more. Tom Trebelhorn, the former Milwaukee Brewers and Chicago Cubs manager hired by the Orioles to teach base running in spring training this year, has broken down the five-second sprint into increments.Twenty increments.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1997
Tony Muser doesn't have an image problem. At this point, he doesn't have an image.The public-address announcer at Camden Yards introduced last night's opponent as "Bob Boone's Kansas City Royals," forgetting that Muser had taken over the club during the All-Star break. Never one to absorb the spotlight, Muser had gone unnoticed again.It figures that Muser, having failed in numerous attempts to become a manager in the big leagues, would get the chance when he wasn't even looking. He was in his first season as hitting coach with the Chicago Cubs, and his fifth season on their staff, when the Royals tabbed him as Boone's replacement.
SPORTS
By Jon Heyman and Jon Heyman,Newsday | May 2, 1991
OAKLAND, Calif. -- Rickey Henderson stole his way into the record books yesterday in his own unique and flashy style. He went in headfirst and, remarkably, his designer sunglasses remained in place. Lou Brock's all-time stolen base record went down with hoopla and fanfare, much of which was provided by the new king himself.Moments after he became No. 1 with his 939th career stolen base, Henderson announced over a loudspeaker: "Lou Brock was a symbol of great base-stealing. But today I am the greatest of all time."
SPORTS
April 6, 1992
Tom Trebelhorn took part in all his old routines yesterday. He pitched batting practice, hit grounders and sprinted enthusiastically across the infield at Milwaukee County Stadium.The number on his back had changed since the last time he was on the field in September. He's now No. 41, not 42. And yesterday, he finally got a view of the stadium -- one he used to jog around -- from the opposing dugout.Six months after he was fired as manager of the Milwaukee Brewers, Trebelhorn returned as a bench coach with the Chicago Cubs.
SPORTS
By Jon Heyman and Jon Heyman,Newsday | May 2, 1991
OAKLAND, Calif. -- Rickey Henderson stole his way into the record books yesterday in his own unique and flashy style. He went in headfirst and, remarkably, his designer sunglasses remained in place. Lou Brock's all-time stolen base record went down with hoopla and fanfare, much of which was provided by the new king himself.Moments after he became No. 1 with his 939th career stolen base, Henderson announced over a loudspeaker: "Lou Brock was a symbol of great base-stealing. But today I am the greatest of all time."
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