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NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
The words coming through the speaker in the Hollifield Station Elementary School gymnasium sounded like a cryptic code: swing through, teacup chain, pass the ocean, wheel and deal, load the boat. But on a wintry Friday night, members of the Tom Thumb Square Dance Club responded to every word, stepping, turning, joining hands, walking around and switching places, mostly without missing a beat. For 45 years, the club has been dancing in Howard County, drawing as many as 100 members 10 years ago, largely through word of mouth.
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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | November 8, 2009
Twenty-nine Novembers ago, I wrote a story for The Sun about New York tinkerer Peter Cooper and the circumstances surrounding his building of the Tom Thumb, the nation's first steam locomotive, which rolled over the rails of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, the nation's first common carrier railroad, founded in Baltimore in 1827. The genesis for my story was a B&O Museum exhibition, "Cooper's Locomotive," that opened that autumn and had been researched and curated by John P. Hankey. Hankey, then 27 and the museum historian, had spent a considerable amount of time researching the Tom Thumb story in Baltimore, New York City and Washington.
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NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
Want to get some attention during a Howard County budget hearing?Approach the podium dressed as a Civil War captain."Uh oh, full regalia," County Council Chairman Darrel Drown said last night as Ed Williams walked to the microphone in search of $50,000 to improve the historic Ellicott City B&O Train Station Museum.Mr. Williams, the museum director, was well-received during the 60-minute public hearing that further showed this year's budget process looks to be a low-conflict affair in Howard.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | August 10, 2007
Yes, I know that Barnum, the Cy Coleman musical about to enter its second and final weekend of production by the Talent Machine Company at St. John's College in Annapolis, was a Tony winner that ran for 854 performances on Broadway in the early 1980s. I also know that it can be a colorful show, chock-full of tumblers, clowns, trapeze artists and the like; and that characters such as Tom Thumb, soprano Jenny Lind and the Barnums themselves lend the proceedings a bit of a historical kick.
TRAVEL
By Randi Kest | April 25, 1999
More than 70 years ago, the first golf-club wielding elf was placed on an 18-hole course and the game of miniature golf was born. To celebrate, the Chattanooga Regional History Museum in Tennessee has opened a display featuring nine holes, some of which are replicated from the original Tom Thumb golf course created by Garnet Carter and all of which are open for play.The exhibit, "Putting Around: Tom Thumb Golf, A National Past-Time Sensation," also has photos and artifacts from the game's seven decades of evolution.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2002
Safeway Inc. is leaving Chicago, apologizing in Philadelphia and losing market share in Texas. So much for the heralded national expansion and consolidation strategy set in motion five years ago by the nation's fourth-largest supermarket chain, based in Pleasanton, Calif. Safeway operated 1,759 stores last year with sales of $34.3 billion. In the late 1990s, Safeway led the consolidation of an industry facing the expansion of Wal-Mart Stores Inc. into the grocery business. But Safeway's strategy is unraveling as the company finds that its methods aren't working with longtime shoppers of its acquired chains, which include Tom Thumb in Dallas, Randall's in Houston, Dominick's in Chicago and Genuardi's in Philadelphia.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | November 8, 2009
Twenty-nine Novembers ago, I wrote a story for The Sun about New York tinkerer Peter Cooper and the circumstances surrounding his building of the Tom Thumb, the nation's first steam locomotive, which rolled over the rails of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, the nation's first common carrier railroad, founded in Baltimore in 1827. The genesis for my story was a B&O Museum exhibition, "Cooper's Locomotive," that opened that autumn and had been researched and curated by John P. Hankey. Hankey, then 27 and the museum historian, had spent a considerable amount of time researching the Tom Thumb story in Baltimore, New York City and Washington.
FEATURES
By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
In a 2005 article for Disability Studies Quarterly, author Betty Adelson notes that little people "are highlighted in the legends and myths of every nation." Dwarfs were teamed with Amazonian gladiators in Rome; elevated to the status of priests in ancient Egypt. Later they became objects of private amusement for English royalty. The 18th century ushered in the golden era of sideshows and circuses - and greater public exposure. Here are a few highlights of little people in American pop culture: Charles Stratton, dubbed "General Tom Thumb," peaked at 3 feet 4 inches.
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | February 23, 1991
Traditions die hard in gardening, especially where vegetables are concerned. When a variety performs well year after year, the grower is loathe to give it up for the uncertainties of an unknown. Some of the entries in the latest seed catalogs, though, sound as though they'd be worth taking a gamble on.If you've never grown popcorn before, Tom Thumb Hulless from Bountiful Gardens might tempt you to check it out. Practically hulless as its name implies and lacking the usual hard center after it's popped, the breed is called "the finest eating of all open-pollinated varieties."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | August 10, 2007
Yes, I know that Barnum, the Cy Coleman musical about to enter its second and final weekend of production by the Talent Machine Company at St. John's College in Annapolis, was a Tony winner that ran for 854 performances on Broadway in the early 1980s. I also know that it can be a colorful show, chock-full of tumblers, clowns, trapeze artists and the like; and that characters such as Tom Thumb, soprano Jenny Lind and the Barnums themselves lend the proceedings a bit of a historical kick.
FEATURES
By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
In a 2005 article for Disability Studies Quarterly, author Betty Adelson notes that little people "are highlighted in the legends and myths of every nation." Dwarfs were teamed with Amazonian gladiators in Rome; elevated to the status of priests in ancient Egypt. Later they became objects of private amusement for English royalty. The 18th century ushered in the golden era of sideshows and circuses - and greater public exposure. Here are a few highlights of little people in American pop culture: Charles Stratton, dubbed "General Tom Thumb," peaked at 3 feet 4 inches.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
The words coming through the speaker in the Hollifield Station Elementary School gymnasium sounded like a cryptic code: swing through, teacup chain, pass the ocean, wheel and deal, load the boat. But on a wintry Friday night, members of the Tom Thumb Square Dance Club responded to every word, stepping, turning, joining hands, walking around and switching places, mostly without missing a beat. For 45 years, the club has been dancing in Howard County, drawing as many as 100 members 10 years ago, largely through word of mouth.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2002
Safeway Inc. is leaving Chicago, apologizing in Philadelphia and losing market share in Texas. So much for the heralded national expansion and consolidation strategy set in motion five years ago by the nation's fourth-largest supermarket chain, based in Pleasanton, Calif. Safeway operated 1,759 stores last year with sales of $34.3 billion. In the late 1990s, Safeway led the consolidation of an industry facing the expansion of Wal-Mart Stores Inc. into the grocery business. But Safeway's strategy is unraveling as the company finds that its methods aren't working with longtime shoppers of its acquired chains, which include Tom Thumb in Dallas, Randall's in Houston, Dominick's in Chicago and Genuardi's in Philadelphia.
TRAVEL
By Randi Kest | April 25, 1999
More than 70 years ago, the first golf-club wielding elf was placed on an 18-hole course and the game of miniature golf was born. To celebrate, the Chattanooga Regional History Museum in Tennessee has opened a display featuring nine holes, some of which are replicated from the original Tom Thumb golf course created by Garnet Carter and all of which are open for play.The exhibit, "Putting Around: Tom Thumb Golf, A National Past-Time Sensation," also has photos and artifacts from the game's seven decades of evolution.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
Want to get some attention during a Howard County budget hearing?Approach the podium dressed as a Civil War captain."Uh oh, full regalia," County Council Chairman Darrel Drown said last night as Ed Williams walked to the microphone in search of $50,000 to improve the historic Ellicott City B&O Train Station Museum.Mr. Williams, the museum director, was well-received during the 60-minute public hearing that further showed this year's budget process looks to be a low-conflict affair in Howard.
NEWS
By Robin Miller | June 18, 1992
ROBERT Paul Sarro is one of the millions of Americans George Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Perot will never meet.He is not a famous person. He has no expense account. Few of his neighbors even know his real name. "Everybody just calls me 'Porky,' " he says. "That's what they know me by. They don't need no telephone number to get hold of me. Everybody knows where I hang out."Porky hangs out at Hollins Market most of the time these days because that's where he works. The rest of the time, he can be found at Tom Thumb, a local beer bar that caters to people who don't fit in with the yuppie crowd that is slowly taking over the neighborhood.
NEWS
By Robin Miller | June 18, 1992
ROBERT Paul Sarro is one of the millions of Americans George Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Perot will never meet.He is not a famous person. He has no expense account. Few of his neighbors even know his real name. "Everybody just calls me 'Porky,' " he says. "That's what they know me by. They don't need no telephone number to get hold of me. Everybody knows where I hang out."Porky hangs out at Hollins Market most of the time these days because that's where he works. The rest of the time, he can be found at Tom Thumb, a local beer bar that caters to people who don't fit in with the yuppie crowd that is slowly taking over the neighborhood.
NEWS
August 12, 2005
This month 175 years ago, Howard County was the site of a milestone in American transportation history. It was on Aug. 28, 1830, that "Peter Cooper ran his locomotive, the 'Tom Thumb,' along the Patapsco at the unbelievable speed of 18 miles per hour," according to Barbara W. Feaga's article in Howard's Roads To the Past. "A short time later, Mr. Cooper raced his locomotive with one of horse-drawn coaches between Relay House and Baltimore. Although the locomotive lost the contest, the supremacy of steam power was firmly established over horse power."
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | February 23, 1991
Traditions die hard in gardening, especially where vegetables are concerned. When a variety performs well year after year, the grower is loathe to give it up for the uncertainties of an unknown. Some of the entries in the latest seed catalogs, though, sound as though they'd be worth taking a gamble on.If you've never grown popcorn before, Tom Thumb Hulless from Bountiful Gardens might tempt you to check it out. Practically hulless as its name implies and lacking the usual hard center after it's popped, the breed is called "the finest eating of all open-pollinated varieties."
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