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By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 30, 2001
The Real Thing, Tom Stoppard's witty drama about love, infidelity and playwriting, opens tomorrow at the Olney Theatre Center. A 1984 Tony Award winner for best new play and a 2000 winner for best revival, The Real Thing displays some of the British writer's slickest wordplay. Richard Pilcher, a faculty member at the Baltimore School for the Arts, has the lead role, portraying a fictitious playwright. The cast also includes Valerie Leonard, James Matthew Ryan and Kate Hampton. Direction is by Cheryl Faraone.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Three men in a home for aging veterans yearn for a taste of life beyond the institution's grounds. They want to soar right out of there, like the geese in a V-formation they can see overhead. Those World War I veterans are the sole characters in "Heroes," the Tom Stoppard-translated comedy by Gerald Sibleyras that opens Friday at Everyman Theatre . The production can't help but take on extra significance. It's the company's last scheduled staging at the Charles Street location where Everyman has been based since 1994.
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NEWS
By R.N. Marshall and R.N. Marshall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 2004
Playwright Tom Stoppard, author of such classic works of theater as Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead, The Real Thing, Rough Crossing, Travesties and The Real Inspector Hound, among others, is best known for his erudite wit and delicious command of the English language. As a screenwriter, his films, such as Empire of the Sun and Shakespeare In Love, have earned high praise from critics and audiences. Columbia's Rep Stage, the professional theater in residence at Howard Community College, is ending its 2003-2004 season with Arcadia, another Stoppard gem. Set in the early 1800s, as well as present day, Arcadia takes the audience on a fascinating journey back and forth between eras to discover answers to an intriguing mystery of love, history and deception that centers on the romantic poet Lord Byron.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2005
Shakespeare Festival Ushering in a season dubbed "Reality. Shakespeare," the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival presents The Merry Wives of Windsor, opening tomorrow in the meadow at Evergreen House. "Reality. Shakespeare," says artistic director James Kinstle, is the festival's way of honoring Shakespeare as the ultimate "pop culture writer" of the Elizabethan era. With that in mind, Kinstle says, performances of Merry Wives will be preceded by Elizabethan-style pre-show entertainment including strolling players, flower sellers and musicians.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2004
"History never embraces more than a small part of reality," said La Rochefoucauld. The maxim is brilliantly illustrated by Tom Stoppard's Arcadia, the current production at Columbia's Rep Stage. Although it offers plenty of Stoppard's customary wit and word play, Arcadia is a philosophical exercise -- an exploration of chaos theory. The dialogue bristles with references to mathematics, physics, philosophy, history, literature and English culture. It will be a rare playgoer (or reviewer)
FEATURES
May 23, 2002
Invisible Theater Company. Auditions for Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead by Tom Stoppard. 7 p.m.--9 p.m. May 30 and 31 at Roland Park Country School's Sinex Theater, 5204 Roland Ave. Needed are men and women 16 or older. Prepare a monologue. Call 410-499-7629 or e-mail invisibletheater@hotmail.com. The Vagabond Players. Auditions for the 87th season opening production of Two Weeks with the Queen. 7 p.m. June 10 and 11 at 806 S. Broadway. Needed are men and women of all ages, and boys ages 10-15, to play Australian or British characters.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 10, 1991
ROSENCRANTZ and Guildenstern'' makes a very easy transfer from stage to screen. It may even be an improvement over the stage version because it's shorter.Tom Stoppard, who wrote the play and directed it, also did the script for this admirable film version. It has an immensely clever -- premise. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are minor characters in Shakespeare's ''Hamlet.'' Boyhood friends of the melancholy Dane, they are asked by the king -- Hamlet's stepfather -- to determine if Hamlet's madness is real or feigned.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 1, 2001
`Bye Bye Birdie' opens Olney Theatre season Olney Theatre Center opens its 2001 season tomorrow with "Bye Bye Birdie," the 1961 Adams and Strouse musical about a rock and roll star and his effect on the teens in small-town America. Continuing the practice instituted two seasons ago, the season opener showcases young musical-theater performers from the Washington area. Here's the rest of the Olney main-stage season: "The Rivals," by Richard Brinsley Sheridan (April 17-May 20); "Art," by Yasmina Reza (June 5-July 8)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 2001
Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers present their spring production - Tom Stoppard's adult farce "On the Razzle" - in a two-weekend run beginning tomorrow at Pascal Center for the Performing Arts. Set in 19th-century Vienna, the comedy centers on men looking for adventure and women seeking romance. Based on Austrian playwright Johann Nestroy's 19th-century farce "Einen Jux will er sich machen" - the source of Thornton Wilder's "The Matchmaker," which later became "Hello, Dolly!"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2005
Shakespeare Festival Ushering in a season dubbed "Reality. Shakespeare," the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival presents The Merry Wives of Windsor, opening tomorrow in the meadow at Evergreen House. "Reality. Shakespeare," says artistic director James Kinstle, is the festival's way of honoring Shakespeare as the ultimate "pop culture writer" of the Elizabethan era. With that in mind, Kinstle says, performances of Merry Wives will be preceded by Elizabethan-style pre-show entertainment including strolling players, flower sellers and musicians.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2004
"History never embraces more than a small part of reality," said La Rochefoucauld. The maxim is brilliantly illustrated by Tom Stoppard's Arcadia, the current production at Columbia's Rep Stage. Although it offers plenty of Stoppard's customary wit and word play, Arcadia is a philosophical exercise -- an exploration of chaos theory. The dialogue bristles with references to mathematics, physics, philosophy, history, literature and English culture. It will be a rare playgoer (or reviewer)
NEWS
By R.N. Marshall and R.N. Marshall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 2004
Playwright Tom Stoppard, author of such classic works of theater as Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead, The Real Thing, Rough Crossing, Travesties and The Real Inspector Hound, among others, is best known for his erudite wit and delicious command of the English language. As a screenwriter, his films, such as Empire of the Sun and Shakespeare In Love, have earned high praise from critics and audiences. Columbia's Rep Stage, the professional theater in residence at Howard Community College, is ending its 2003-2004 season with Arcadia, another Stoppard gem. Set in the early 1800s, as well as present day, Arcadia takes the audience on a fascinating journey back and forth between eras to discover answers to an intriguing mystery of love, history and deception that centers on the romantic poet Lord Byron.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 25, 2003
When Rep Stage in Columbia opens its 2003-2004 season tomorrow with Fool for Love, it will mark the reunion of a director and a kindred playwright. The director is Jackson Phippin, and the playwright is Sam Shepard. Phippin, who directed Shepard's Buried Child at the Virginia Stage Company 20 years ago, said last week, "I share the same sort of sense of theatricality that Shepard has. I like meta-theatrical events, given my past with experimental work." Phippin, who served as associate artistic director of Center Stage from 1979 until 1985, came to Baltimore in the mid-1970s with the experimental troupe KRAKEN.
FEATURES
May 23, 2002
Invisible Theater Company. Auditions for Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead by Tom Stoppard. 7 p.m.--9 p.m. May 30 and 31 at Roland Park Country School's Sinex Theater, 5204 Roland Ave. Needed are men and women 16 or older. Prepare a monologue. Call 410-499-7629 or e-mail invisibletheater@hotmail.com. The Vagabond Players. Auditions for the 87th season opening production of Two Weeks with the Queen. 7 p.m. June 10 and 11 at 806 S. Broadway. Needed are men and women of all ages, and boys ages 10-15, to play Australian or British characters.
TRAVEL
By SARAH CLAYTON and SARAH CLAYTON,Special to the Sun | October 14, 2001
And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them into shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name. -- A Midsummer Night's Dream The Blackfriars Playhouse, William Shakespeare's other theater, opened in Staunton, Va., last month after closing almost 400 years ago in London. The arrival of the playhouse, a replica of one of the earliest theaters in the English-speaking world, is the centerpiece of a building and restoration program that may well put this historic town of 24,000 on the map for tourists and theater enthusiasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 30, 2001
The Real Thing, Tom Stoppard's witty drama about love, infidelity and playwriting, opens tomorrow at the Olney Theatre Center. A 1984 Tony Award winner for best new play and a 2000 winner for best revival, The Real Thing displays some of the British writer's slickest wordplay. Richard Pilcher, a faculty member at the Baltimore School for the Arts, has the lead role, portraying a fictitious playwright. The cast also includes Valerie Leonard, James Matthew Ryan and Kate Hampton. Direction is by Cheryl Faraone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 25, 2003
When Rep Stage in Columbia opens its 2003-2004 season tomorrow with Fool for Love, it will mark the reunion of a director and a kindred playwright. The director is Jackson Phippin, and the playwright is Sam Shepard. Phippin, who directed Shepard's Buried Child at the Virginia Stage Company 20 years ago, said last week, "I share the same sort of sense of theatricality that Shepard has. I like meta-theatrical events, given my past with experimental work." Phippin, who served as associate artistic director of Center Stage from 1979 until 1985, came to Baltimore in the mid-1970s with the experimental troupe KRAKEN.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 2001
Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers present their spring production - Tom Stoppard's adult farce "On the Razzle" - in a two-weekend run beginning tomorrow at Pascal Center for the Performing Arts. Set in 19th-century Vienna, the comedy centers on men looking for adventure and women seeking romance. Based on Austrian playwright Johann Nestroy's 19th-century farce "Einen Jux will er sich machen" - the source of Thornton Wilder's "The Matchmaker," which later became "Hello, Dolly!"
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