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Tom Petty

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By Greg Knot, Tribune Newspapers | June 17, 2010
Tom Petty has been making albums with the Heartbreakers since 1976, but "Mojo" is the first studio release in which the band sounds like it's on equal footing with the songs. Tom Petty has been making albums with the Heartbreakers since 1976, but "Mojo" is the first studio release in which the band sounds like it's on equal footing with the songs. That's both a plus and minus. Petty's best songs have a certain economy best served by terse arrangements and the self-effacing interplay of his bandmates.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Greg Knot, Tribune Newspapers | June 17, 2010
Tom Petty has been making albums with the Heartbreakers since 1976, but "Mojo" is the first studio release in which the band sounds like it's on equal footing with the songs. Tom Petty has been making albums with the Heartbreakers since 1976, but "Mojo" is the first studio release in which the band sounds like it's on equal footing with the songs. That's both a plus and minus. Petty's best songs have a certain economy best served by terse arrangements and the self-effacing interplay of his bandmates.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 7, 1995
Say the phrase "rock star," and what comes to mind is fame and fortune, glamour and glitz, big egos and splashy behavior. Think of Tom Petty, however, and none of that seems to apply.Where other rock stars are happy to contribute to the cult of personality, Petty seems almost a cipher. He doesn't court publicity, rarely gives interviews (he has declined all requests during his current tour) and is seldom seen hanging out at hip nightspots.As a result, about the only thing most fans really know about him is his music -- and that's one reason fellow musicians admire him so. "I'm a big fan of his," Sheryl Crow said recently.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 4, 2008
PRE-GAME TL Too long. Will someone please explain why Ryan Seacrest is all over radio and TV these days? We simply don't get it. We needed a nap after the pre-game activities so we were able to stay up and watch the game. Moment of truth: Fox analyst Terry Bradshaw admitting how "butt ugly" he was next to Tom Brady during their interview. No truer words were spoken yesterday. Alicia Keys was a fine choice to perform before the game. Anything to get Seacrest off the stage. Did we really need a reading of the Declaration of Independence?
FEATURES
By Gary Graff and Gary Graff,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 25, 1991
Toward the end of their new album, "Into the Great Wide Open," Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers crank into the uppity, rockabilly beat of "Makin' Some Noise," a song that may be the closest to a declaration of purpose Mr. Petty has made:"I had to rock the boat, I had to shake the tree/ To see what'd fall down on me/ I thought, Maybe I can make it if I never give in/ I been down before, I ain't going down again."During 15 years of recording, Mr. Petty has never given in.The 40-year-old rocker, who was scheduled to perform last night at the Capital Centre, has relentlessly created his own brand of rock, ignoring marketing and musical trends and personal travails.
FEATURES
By Tom Moon and Tom Moon,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 8, 2002
Is America willing to spend its hard-earned cash to hear a rock star rail about how craven pop culture has become? Tom Petty is about to find out. On his acidic concept album, The Last DJ, which arrives today, the famously laid-back Florida-born rocker bemoans an entertainment industry with executives whose mantra is, "You get to be famous, I get to be rich." In songs plainspoken and devastatingly direct, Petty laments the corporatization of radio and the greed that stunts artistic careers, the false worship of American Idols and the profit-at-any-cost orientation that derailed Enron and, he believes, exists throughout the business world.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1991
Perhaps Tom Petty was just stating the obvious when he called The Heartbreakers "a multi-talented bunch of guys."Maybe, in his own strange way, he is guilty of the understatement of the year.But sometimes an adoring crowd, like the small but passionate one gathered at the Capital Centre last night, gets a little too enamored with the quarterback to fully appreciate the front line that does much of the dirty work. A subtle little reminder can never hurt.In this case, Petty's Heartbreakers (is it really fair to give him the possessive?
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 13, 1999
To Americans, there is no personality trait more noble or admirable than rugged individualism.Other cultures may prize conformity and warn that the nail that sticks out gets hammered down, but here in the U.S. of A., we value those who march to the beat of a different drummer. We see the ability to stand one's ground as a true test of moral fiber.Tom Petty is a case in point. Not only has he maintained a remarkably unique voice as a musician, resisting the tides of fashion and answering only to his own muse, but he takes an equally uncompromising stance toward the business side of rock and roll.
FEATURES
December 6, 2005
Critic's Pick-- Pop salutes top sellers at the Billboard Music Awards (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45). Tom Petty (above) gets a lifetime achievement trophy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | July 21, 2005
Tom Petty / Merriweather Legendary rockers Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers play Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia, Wednesday night at 7. Tickets are $29-$59 and are available through Ticketmaster by calling 410-547-SEAT or visiting www.ticket master.com. Ozzfest / Nissan Pavilion Ozzfest, featuring Black Sabbath (above), Iron Maiden, Rob Zombie and others, gets under way Sunday morning at Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge, 7800 Cellar Door Drive in Bristow, Va. The event begins at 9 a.m. and tickets, $30.50-$130, are available through Ticketmaster.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 1, 2008
PHOENIX-- --Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers are probably more likely to break a hip than a heart these days, but that's one of the reasons they were chosen to headline the Super Bowl Halftime Show on Sunday. The NFL loves that old-time rock 'n' roll, but only because it can't trust today's pop stars to keep their clothes on for the 12 minutes they get to entertain the entire planet. OK, it's not really the entire planet, but when you've got a half-billion people tuning in to see your football game, it's normal to want to exercise a little control over your product, something the NFL officials realized right after Janet Jackson's infamous "wardrobe malfunction" a few years ago. So, instead of signing the hottest acts on the planet, the NFL settles for the safest mega-acts available, which is great news for those of us who remember when they were still considered outlaws.
FEATURES
December 6, 2005
Critic's Pick-- Pop salutes top sellers at the Billboard Music Awards (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45). Tom Petty (above) gets a lifetime achievement trophy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | July 21, 2005
Tom Petty / Merriweather Legendary rockers Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers play Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia, Wednesday night at 7. Tickets are $29-$59 and are available through Ticketmaster by calling 410-547-SEAT or visiting www.ticket master.com. Ozzfest / Nissan Pavilion Ozzfest, featuring Black Sabbath (above), Iron Maiden, Rob Zombie and others, gets under way Sunday morning at Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge, 7800 Cellar Door Drive in Bristow, Va. The event begins at 9 a.m. and tickets, $30.50-$130, are available through Ticketmaster.
FEATURES
By Tom Moon and Tom Moon,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 8, 2002
Is America willing to spend its hard-earned cash to hear a rock star rail about how craven pop culture has become? Tom Petty is about to find out. On his acidic concept album, The Last DJ, which arrives today, the famously laid-back Florida-born rocker bemoans an entertainment industry with executives whose mantra is, "You get to be famous, I get to be rich." In songs plainspoken and devastatingly direct, Petty laments the corporatization of radio and the greed that stunts artistic careers, the false worship of American Idols and the profit-at-any-cost orientation that derailed Enron and, he believes, exists throughout the business world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan | July 7, 2002
Since the mid-'80s, Blue Dogs has slowly made its name with the catchy, foot-tapping, head-bopping and highly hum-worthy tunes it has played for intimate crowds in its native South Carolina and beyond. The result has been a low-key career that's produced seven albums, including the bluegrassy Blue Dogs and Friends: Live at the Florence Little Theater released in February. Not bad for a group that was long labeled a "bar band" and when two boys became friends at Cub Scouts in Florence, S.C. Former Scouts Bobby Houck and Hank Futch and bandmates David Stewart and Greg Walker finally quit their day jobs in 1996 to begin touring.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | September 22, 2001
A little more than a week after a deadly attack on American soil, entertainment giants joined in an unprecedented patriotic broadcast carried by all the networks. The day was Dec. 15, 1941, eight days after Japanese aviators bombed Pearl Harbor. Stars with names such as Bogart, Garland, Stewart and Welles volunteered to play roles without pay in the radio broadcast of a fact-based drama honoring the 150th anniversary of the ratification of the U.S. Bill of Rights. Similar impulse, different age. Last night, a two-hour telethon carried on about 40 cable and broadcast channels - including those dedicated to music, movies, and Spanish-language shows - sought to raise money to assist those people directly affected by the terrorist strikes of Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan | July 7, 2002
Since the mid-'80s, Blue Dogs has slowly made its name with the catchy, foot-tapping, head-bopping and highly hum-worthy tunes it has played for intimate crowds in its native South Carolina and beyond. The result has been a low-key career that's produced seven albums, including the bluegrassy Blue Dogs and Friends: Live at the Florence Little Theater released in February. Not bad for a group that was long labeled a "bar band" and when two boys became friends at Cub Scouts in Florence, S.C. Former Scouts Bobby Houck and Hank Futch and bandmates David Stewart and Greg Walker finally quit their day jobs in 1996 to begin touring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 17, 1993
SO FAR SO GOODBryan Adams (A&M 31454 0157) What does it say about Bryan Adams that his best songs have all been raucous, guitar-driven rockers, while his biggest hits have all been sappy, sentimental ballads? That he may seem a tough guy on the outside, but deep down he's just an old softie? Maybe, but the answer suggested by his greatest hits collection, "So Far So Good" is a little simpler: He's just not rough enough to be a convincing rock and roller. No matter how much Keith Richards-style guitar he pumps into "The Summer of '69" and "It's Only Love," his voice lacks the sly, Jaggeresque snarl that would make the music seem dangerous.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | September 30, 1999
`Fright Fest'Ghosts, goblins and even mere mortals can experience the thrills and chills of Fright Fest '99 at Six Flags America, 13710 Central Ave., Largo, through October. Take a ride on the Midnight Express Haunted Train, through the Hall of Horrors Haunted House, around Brutal Planet or on the Trail of Terror Haunted Hay Wagon. Kids can trick-or-treat in Looney Tunes Spooky Town, jump around the Pumpkin Bounce, hop on the Kids' Not-So-Scary Hayride and hear Halloween stories. Take part in nightly costume contests and see live shows.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 13, 1999
To Americans, there is no personality trait more noble or admirable than rugged individualism.Other cultures may prize conformity and warn that the nail that sticks out gets hammered down, but here in the U.S. of A., we value those who march to the beat of a different drummer. We see the ability to stand one's ground as a true test of moral fiber.Tom Petty is a case in point. Not only has he maintained a remarkably unique voice as a musician, resisting the tides of fashion and answering only to his own muse, but he takes an equally uncompromising stance toward the business side of rock and roll.
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