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Tom Noonan

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TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron | December 6, 2013
There isn't much that goes on in Baltimore that doesn't include Tom Noonan. The president and CEO of Visit Baltimore is responsible for promoting the region and all of its venues as a destination for conventions, meetings, leisure travelers, day-trippers, and even family reunions. But being Charm City-centric doesn't mean that Noonan doesn't ever get out of town - quite the opposite. As a leader in the tourism industry, he also works with national organizations that teach travel marketing, a role that takes him to destinations far from Baltimore.
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TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron | December 6, 2013
There isn't much that goes on in Baltimore that doesn't include Tom Noonan. The president and CEO of Visit Baltimore is responsible for promoting the region and all of its venues as a destination for conventions, meetings, leisure travelers, day-trippers, and even family reunions. But being Charm City-centric doesn't mean that Noonan doesn't ever get out of town - quite the opposite. As a leader in the tourism industry, he also works with national organizations that teach travel marketing, a role that takes him to destinations far from Baltimore.
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NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD | August 5, 2007
Tom Noonan grew up in the Midwest and calls Rochester, Minn., his hometown, but he fell in love with the Mid-Atlantic when a job opportunity took him to Washington, D.C., several years ago. After spending time in Texas, he moved to Baltimore at the end of December to become head of the city's main tourism organization. "This is like coming home," Noonan says. Noonan, 42, lives with his wife, Mindy, in Canton with their miniature dachshund, Macy. 1. New music for my iPod "I'm a fan of all kinds of music.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
The Natural Products Expo, one of Baltimore's biggest trade shows, has been good for business for Eldersburg-based Salazon Chocolate Co. Three-year-old Salazon, which makes organic salted chocolate bars, convinced Wegmans supermarkets to sell its products during the 2011 show. Salazon, which uses no artificial ingredients or preservatives and grows its beans in the Dominican Republic without pesticides or fertilizers, is among a handful of local businesses that plan to be back on the trade show floor this week when the four-day expo returns to Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erika Milvy and Erika Milvy,Special to The Sun | November 11, 1994
The centerpiece of Tom Noonan's relentlessly real-time, two-character, one-room black comedy is a creepy children's story that Jackie, a legal secretary from Queens, reads to her uneasy dinner guest. Full of cannibalism, incest, infanticide and topless go-go dancers, her reading is the unsettling dessert after an excruciatingly awkward dinner date.But when Tom Noonan, who wrote, directed and stars in "What Happened Was . . . " brought his screenplay to a prospective producer, he was told, "Eh, throw the play out, shoot this story, that's a movie!
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2010
During the budget year that ended June 30, Baltimore's tourism and convention agency booked 495,896 hotel room nights for future years, the second-highest figure in the group's 30-year history. The highest figure was about 522,000 room nights booked during fiscal 2009. Tom Noonan, president and chief executive of Visit Baltimore, the tourism agency, announced the figure at the organization's annual business meeting Tuesday. He said the number of future bookings during fiscal 2010 is twice the number of room nights booked five years ago, when Baltimore had fewer hotels.
FEATURES
October 31, 2002
Primetime Thursday reports on the real story behind America's most famous haunted house, immortalized in the classic scary movie The Amityville Horror. The house's former owner - who bought it after an entire family was murdered there - chronicles the bizarre occurrences he claims his family witnessed, including accounts of apparitions, levitations and mysterious life forces. While his spooky story sold millions of books and movie tickets, the debunkers say it's all a big hoax. Primetime tries to separate the bizarre facts from the pure fiction.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
The Yankees are coming, and Baltimore's economy is ready. Less than 24 hours after the Orioles' playoff clinching win, city businesses are preparing for an influx of dough generated from Sunday's game against the New York Yankees. "We don't have hard numbers, but what we do have is a lot of buzz," said Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. "There is a buzz and excitement in hotels, restaurants, and even in the retail shops in and around downtown as we anticipate the playoff games. I'm looking forward to getting some great economic numbers on the other side of the games.
FEATURES
By John Hartl and John Hartl,Seattle Times | January 18, 1995
The international film-festival year used to begin in earnest with Berlin in February, but the increasing prominence of the Sundance Film Festival has turned mid-January into the true starting point.Few 1995 films are as eagerly awaited as this year's Sundance opener: "Before Sunrise," written and directed by Richard Linklater, the talented Texas filmmaker who made "Slacker" and "Dazed and Confused."Starring Ethan Hawke as an American student who spends a day in Vienna with a French stranger (Julie Delpy)
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
City convention officials booked the third-highest number of convention room nights ever over the past fiscal year, Visit Baltimore, the city's tourism and convention bureau, announced Thursday. The room nights are reserved for future years. Visit Baltimore booked 475,554 convention room nights in city hotels as far out as 2032 during the fiscal year that ended June 30. Two-thirds of those bookings will be for events held in 2016 or later. Though the number of bookings edged up just 4 percent over the previous year's figure — by 18,000 bookings — it represented the third-highest number of future reservations in a single year, behind 522,000 room nights reserved in fiscal 2009 and 495,000 in fiscal 2010.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
Otakon, the Japanese and East Asian anime and culture convention that has drawn tens of thousands of people to Baltimore since 1999, will be held in Washington beginning in 2017, organizers announced Sunday. In a statement, Otakon organizers attributed the move to the "state of the facilities in Baltimore and their uncertain future" and referred to imminent plans to replace the Baltimore Convention Center and the Baltimore Arena. But such plans are not yet firm. The 20-year-old Otakon convention was held this weekend at the Baltimore Convention Center, drawing a reported 32,000 attendees over three days.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
By the end of September, Maryland Science Center visitors will be able to stop by The Shed for lessons on bicycle repair or a tutorial on soldering or some other hands-on class. They'll have a chance to sit under a state-of-the-art digital sky in the refurbished Davis Planetarium, where new technology will better integrate video into its shows. Both are part of a $3.15 million project that will be the most significant renovation of the Inner Harbor landmark since 2004. With attendance hovering around 350,000 but tourism spending slowly increasing, the center is working to evolve into more of a hands-on community hub rather than a passive attraction.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
With the Orioles celebrating the inclusion of five players in this year's All-Star Game, the club also has its eye on hosting the 2016 game. The Orioles have expressed continual interest in having the midseason showcase at Camden Yards in three years, confirmed club spokesman Greg Bader. That would be 23 years after the ballpark last hosted an All-Star Game. Bader declined to discuss specifics, but the Orioles believe they have a strong shot for several reasons. The site generally alternates between National League and American League cities, and with Cincinnati hosting in 2015, the AL would likely be up the following year.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
The Yankees are coming, and Baltimore's economy is ready. Less than 24 hours after the Orioles' playoff clinching win, city businesses are preparing for an influx of dough generated from Sunday's game against the New York Yankees. "We don't have hard numbers, but what we do have is a lot of buzz," said Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. "There is a buzz and excitement in hotels, restaurants, and even in the retail shops in and around downtown as we anticipate the playoff games. I'm looking forward to getting some great economic numbers on the other side of the games.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
City convention officials booked the third-highest number of convention room nights ever over the past fiscal year, Visit Baltimore, the city's tourism and convention bureau, announced Thursday. The room nights are reserved for future years. Visit Baltimore booked 475,554 convention room nights in city hotels as far out as 2032 during the fiscal year that ended June 30. Two-thirds of those bookings will be for events held in 2016 or later. Though the number of bookings edged up just 4 percent over the previous year's figure — by 18,000 bookings — it represented the third-highest number of future reservations in a single year, behind 522,000 room nights reserved in fiscal 2009 and 495,000 in fiscal 2010.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2011
City officials are calling the Baltimore Grand Prix an economic success, but a new study conducted for the city's tourism arm suggests that it funneled far less money to local businesses than race organizers predicted. The report for Visit Baltimore, released Friday, estimates that spectators from outside the Baltimore region, non-local vendors and race promoters spent almost $28 million in and near the city during the Labor Day weekend event. Baltimore Racing Development, the financially beleaguered race organizer, issued its own report last year that projected about $70 million in race-fueled spending.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN and SLOANE BROWN,Sloane@sloanebrown.com | February 22, 2009
The Marriott Waterfront mezzanine was a mob scene. About 800 folks filled the floor for the cocktail hour of the fifth annual Aspire Gala benefiting the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation. "It warms my heart that, in an economy like this, we still sell out," said foundation executive director Steve Salem. "That's not an easy thing to do." Among the guests were almost 50 current and former pro baseball players and coaches, including the evening's honorees, Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Jamie Moyer and former University of Notre Dame coach Lou Holtz.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
Otakon, the Japanese and East Asian anime and culture convention that has drawn tens of thousands of people to Baltimore since 1999, will be held in Washington beginning in 2017, organizers announced Sunday. In a statement, Otakon organizers attributed the move to the "state of the facilities in Baltimore and their uncertain future" and referred to imminent plans to replace the Baltimore Convention Center and the Baltimore Arena. But such plans are not yet firm. The 20-year-old Otakon convention was held this weekend at the Baltimore Convention Center, drawing a reported 32,000 attendees over three days.
SPORTS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
The inaugural Baltimore Grand Prix gave the local economy much of the boost officials hoped for — though organizers say they will seek to spread the benefits to more businesses next year. The street race helped pump up weekend revenues at a sampling of hotels by 44 percent compared with Labor Day weekend last year, according to preliminary counts. It also drove average room rates for those hotels up 55 percent and more than doubled the take at city-owned parking garages. The figures, compiled by the research firm Forward Analytics, were released Thursday by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Baltimore Racing Development, the private group that produced the three-day event.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2011
Last year Baltimore's tourism officials encouraged visitors to find their "happy place" and created the world's largest smiley face to help lift the region out of its doldrums. In previous years, they coaxed city visitors and residents to see jellyfish at the aquarium and celebrate Edgar Allan Poe's 200th birthday. For 2011, the tourism agency, Visit Baltimore, plans to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War's start by promoting local museum exhibits and cultural attractions with connections to the war. Visit Baltimore officials will hold a briefing Wednesday at Camden Station to outline details of the $65,000 tourism campaign.
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