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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 27, 1995
Tom Miller's painted furniture, now being given a major joint retrospective at the Baltimore Museum of Art and Maryland Art Place, has a lot about it to make you smile. But such an extensive exhibit of Miller's work -- 59 works produced over a 10-year period -- also gives us an opportunity to see how much the work has matured, both in purely visual terms and in terms of what it means.Even very early pieces, such as an untitled screen of 1984 or the framed wall piece "Mojo Mama" of 1985 (both at the BMA)
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2002
STEVENSVILLE -- Amid the Christmas decorations at the home of Tom and Connie Miller sit dozens of Nativity sets from around the world, a reminder that Jesus came into the world without a place to lay his head. At the Millers', where there always seems to be room for one more, there is a simple philosophy: "An empty bed," says the Rev. Connie Miller, "is a wasted bed." The Millers, a married couple who are both Lutheran pastors, have spent the past seven years filling their one-story rancher on Kent Island with a multicultural mosaic of children.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 11, 1997
This time around, let's relax and enjoy Tom Miller's painted furniture, currently on view at Steven Scott Gallery.Since about a decade ago, when the work of this Baltimore artist began to find an audience first locally and then on a national scale, it's been scrutinized, analyzed, solemnized quite enough.And all because it's so much fun. The old furniture that Miller finds and paints in his trademark Technicolor style has an immediate appeal that people tend to resist. Afraid somebody will think they're calling it superficial, they emphasize instead its serious side.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2002
CHURCHVILLE - Tom Miller, enveloped in a protective suit and face mask, stepped onto the golf green and faced the hole, sweating. He stopped to wipe his brow. Miller, a member of a Harford County hazardous materials team, wasn't looking for contaminants. He was lining up a tough putt. And he was earning credit toward a state requirement that hazmat team members spend two hours a year suited up and maneuvering in full gear. More than a dozen of the crew's 27 part-time members showed up at Churchville Golf and Baseball on Route 22 yesterday.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 12, 1993
If there's anybody out there who doesn't know about Tom Miller's wonderful painted furniture, run right to Steven Scott Gallery and make its acquaintance. That is, if you can get in, because all those who do know about Miller's work will probably be there already.Painted furniture had a great tradition in Baltimore in the 19th century, and the best of it was as high style as Baltimore ever got. Miller has turned the tables on this tradition by taking articles of already-made furniture and decorating them with partly deco-inspired but thoroughly original designs in the brightest of colors.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 7, 1992
Tom Miller's furniture, now showing at Steven Scott, can be appreciated on a lot of levels, not the least of which is that it makes us happy.To be serious first -- let's eat our vegetables before we have dessert, so to speak -- there's the ecological level. Like other art furniture makers, Miller recycles old objects. Tables and chairs and cabinets and bookcases that you or I would overlook as totally unsuitable, Miller sees as color and pattern and statement and fun, and rescues them from oblivion to do double duty as utilitarian objects and works of art.There's also the African-American statement level.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 19, 2002
Despite a burden of troubles that might have disheartened a lesser artist, Baltimore native Tom Miller managed to create works that were full of joyful whimsy. The trademark of his style was a smile, expressed through gentle good humor that poked fun at life's pain even as it acknowledged it. Miller's career was tragically cut short in 2000 when, at the age of 54, he died after a protracted struggle with AIDS. By then he had become a beloved figure among local collectors, who often waited up to two years to purchase examples of his exquisite fancy.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill | January 26, 1992
Tom Miller describes himself as a rescuer, one who delights in finding some broken-down table or chair in an alley or junk shop and proceeds to patch it, paint it and place it on a pedestal in a museum somewhere."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 24, 2000
Tom Miller, a highly acclaimed Baltimore artist who invented a style of exuberant, brightly painted furniture known as "Afro-Deco," died yesterday at Joseph Richly Hospice in Baltimore after a long illness. He was 54. Miller's work was exhibited regularly in Baltimore galleries, and he enjoyed a devoted following among collectors here, who often waited up to two years to purchase examples of his work. Miller's furniture and sculpture were the subject of a major retrospective at the Baltimore Museum of Art and Maryland Art Place in 1995, and he was represented in several important group shows that toured the country.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 11, 2000
"This is not a eulogy, this is truly a celebration," said Leslie King-Hammond as she looked out over a colorful crowd of friends, colleagues and family gathered last night to celebrate the life and art of Tom Miller. Nearly 200 members of the local art community came to the auditorium of the Baltimore Museum of Art to memorialize the city's inventive native son and creator of "Afro-Deco" style painted furniture who died June 23 at the age of 54. "This is about tributes and acknowledgments for someone who has performed tremendous service for Baltimore City," said King-Hammond, a dean at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, where Miller earned bachelor's and master's degrees.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 19, 2002
Despite a burden of troubles that might have disheartened a lesser artist, Baltimore native Tom Miller managed to create works that were full of joyful whimsy. The trademark of his style was a smile, expressed through gentle good humor that poked fun at life's pain even as it acknowledged it. Miller's career was tragically cut short in 2000 when, at the age of 54, he died after a protracted struggle with AIDS. By then he had become a beloved figure among local collectors, who often waited up to two years to purchase examples of his exquisite fancy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | December 2, 2001
Once again, the annual benefit and auction for Grant-A-Wish / The Children's Promise Foundation was a star-studded event, both on paper and in person. About 500 guests roamed the BWI Marriott Hotel ballroom, perusing a plethora of celebrity paraphernalia. They entered their bids on photos, scripts and other goodies signed by entertainment and sports stars like: Alanis Morissette, Jimmy Carter, Henry Winkler, Hasim Rahman, Don Shula, Tom Matte, Art Donovan, Doug Flutie and the stars of the TV shows Friends and Spin City.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 11, 2000
"This is not a eulogy, this is truly a celebration," said Leslie King-Hammond as she looked out over a colorful crowd of friends, colleagues and family gathered last night to celebrate the life and art of Tom Miller. Nearly 200 members of the local art community came to the auditorium of the Baltimore Museum of Art to memorialize the city's inventive native son and creator of "Afro-Deco" style painted furniture who died June 23 at the age of 54. "This is about tributes and acknowledgments for someone who has performed tremendous service for Baltimore City," said King-Hammond, a dean at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, where Miller earned bachelor's and master's degrees.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 24, 2000
Tom Miller, a highly acclaimed Baltimore artist who invented a style of exuberant, brightly painted furniture known as "Afro-Deco," died yesterday at Joseph Richly Hospice in Baltimore after a long illness. He was 54. Miller's work was exhibited regularly in Baltimore galleries, and he enjoyed a devoted following among collectors here, who often waited up to two years to purchase examples of his work. Miller's furniture and sculpture were the subject of a major retrospective at the Baltimore Museum of Art and Maryland Art Place in 1995, and he was represented in several important group shows that toured the country.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
HERE ARE A COUPLE of ways Camay Calloway Murphy fosters reading: At a family gathering at Easter, she festooned each of the children's holiday baskets with the first name of the recipient. Murphy's 3-year-old grandson, Cochise, recognized his basket right off."Looks like you can read, Cochise," Grandmother said approvingly, and she and other adults kept up the encouragement."To learn to read," she says, "you need an accepting, encouraging atmosphere."When Cochise was very young, Murphy would read to him from a children's book titled "Baby Bop."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 11, 1997
This time around, let's relax and enjoy Tom Miller's painted furniture, currently on view at Steven Scott Gallery.Since about a decade ago, when the work of this Baltimore artist began to find an audience first locally and then on a national scale, it's been scrutinized, analyzed, solemnized quite enough.And all because it's so much fun. The old furniture that Miller finds and paints in his trademark Technicolor style has an immediate appeal that people tend to resist. Afraid somebody will think they're calling it superficial, they emphasize instead its serious side.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 27, 1996
A lot of people write their autobiographies, but not many paint an autobiography. Tom Miller has done just that, in 16 paintings.Here's Tom as a baby, being admired by neighbors. Here's Tom as a little boy, at a backyard crab feast. Here's Tom finding an old coal scuttle in a neighbor's garage and making it into a jaunty bird -- Tom discovering he's an artist, in other words.And here he is going to the Maryland Institute, College of Art; teaching school; painting a mural on a Baltimore wall.
NEWS
July 10, 1996
A review of the children's book "Can a Coal Scuttle Fly?" in the books section of last Sunday's editions of The Sun should have given the name of the book's artist as Tom Miller.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 7/10/96
NEWS
July 28, 1996
THOMAS V. Mike Miller Jr. has served in the state Senate for 21 years. He's been its president for 10 years. He is proud of that chamber and especially of his long tenure as presiding officer.Yet now Mr. Miller has allowed the Senate to be embarrassed by Gov. Parris N. Glendening. He has put his colleagues in an unfair position. And he has gotten himself in a situation where he owes a big debt of gratitude to the governor. Mr. Glendening is sure to call in that IOU at crucial times.What Mr. Miller did was let it be known that he wouldn't be upset if the governor and his corrections secretary put his son, Thomas V. Miller III, in a $56,000 a year job as a parole commissioner.
NEWS
July 17, 1996
THOMAS V. MILLER III should feel at home in his $56,000 a year job as a parole commissioner. The panel is loaded with folks who got there because of family or political ties. Tom Miller, the son of the powerful Senate president, is no exception.At age 29, Mr. Miller is considerably younger and less experienced than other commissioners. That didn't bother Bishop L. Robinson, the public safety secretary who made the appointment, or Gov. Parris N. Glendening, who gave the O.K. Why worry about years of hard-earned correctional expertise when you can do a favor for the Senate president?
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