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NEWS
April 9, 2008
A Mass of Christian burial for Tom Lewis, a member of the "Catonsville Nine," will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Friday at the Catholic Community of St. Francis Xavier, 13717 Cuba Road, Cockeysville. A eulogy will be delivered at the same location at 7 p.m. tomorrow. Mr. Lewis, 68, an artist and anti-war activist, died Friday of a heart attack at his home in Worcester, Mass.
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FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
At Tom and Marcia Lewis' house in Annapolis, the future meets the past. Last year the couple installed solar panels on the roof of their 110-year-old frame house in the city's Historic District. "We're very much in favor of alternative energy sources," Marcia Lewis says. Residential solar energy sales are booming in the United States, and property owners are increasingly finding ways to combine historic preservation with energy preservation. The Lewises had their panels installed on the back roof of their three-story home on Conduit Street.
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | July 10, 2005
BEFORE SENTENCING an Annapolis lobbyist a few years ago, U.S. District Court Judge J. Frederick Motz lamented what he called a culture of corruption in Annapolis. Judge Motz was presiding over a case in which one of the legislature's premier lobbyists was accused of manufacturing a threat - and then offering himself as the man who could make the threat go away. It was like a mechanic digging an axle-cracking pothole a few blocks from his repair shop. In the 2002 election, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. succeeded in part because he seemed anxious to change that culture.
NEWS
April 9, 2008
A Mass of Christian burial for Tom Lewis, a member of the "Catonsville Nine," will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Friday at the Catholic Community of St. Francis Xavier, 13717 Cuba Road, Cockeysville. A eulogy will be delivered at the same location at 7 p.m. tomorrow. Mr. Lewis, 68, an artist and anti-war activist, died Friday of a heart attack at his home in Worcester, Mass.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | April 6, 2008
Forty years ago next month, Tom Lewis and eight other Vietnam War protesters strode into the offices of U.S. Selective Service Board 33 in Catonsville and left a mark on history. The "Catonsville Nine" emptied file cabinets, hauled 600 draft records into the parking lot and burned them with homemade napalm. Then they prayed and waited to be arrested. That act of civil disobedience on May 17, 1968, inspired headlines - and more than 200 protests at draft board offices across the country.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2005
MUCH OF THE heavy lifting in government gets done by people about whom the public never hears. That's why the name Tom Lewis is not widely known outside a certain circle in Annapolis. For the past 11 years, Lewis, 48, has served as top aide to two speakers of the House of Delegates - spending eight years with Casper R. Taylor Jr. and, most recently, three years with Michael E. Busch. The position has made him one of the most powerful staffers in Annapolis. He has served as gatekeeper, negotiator and advocate.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 16, 1995
On the 19th floor of the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Co. building, Tom Lewis holds up an issue of People magazine and asks 20 young men if they think they might be able to find good role models therein."
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | May 23, 1993
Black and white images flickered across the screen.A group of neatly dressed men and women dumped papers from two wire baskets, poured liquid on the pile and set it alight.Joining hands, they prayed as the burning sheets danced into the air. The police arrived and took them to jail.Suddenly yesterday, it was May 17, 1968, again and the Catonsville Nine -- seven men and two women led by two Roman Catholic priests -- had invaded a Frederick Road Selective Service office and burned draft records using homemade napalm.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
At Tom and Marcia Lewis' house in Annapolis, the future meets the past. Last year the couple installed solar panels on the roof of their 110-year-old frame house in the city's Historic District. "We're very much in favor of alternative energy sources," Marcia Lewis says. Residential solar energy sales are booming in the United States, and property owners are increasingly finding ways to combine historic preservation with energy preservation. The Lewises had their panels installed on the back roof of their three-story home on Conduit Street.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 27, 2008
Why can't impatience be a virtue, too? I know, "Slow and steady wins the race," and "Rome wasn't built in a day." But we got to the moon because John F. Kennedy poked a stick in the placid behinds of Americans and the rocket establishment. Teams such as the Detroit Tigers get better because the guy with the checkbook OKs a blockbuster deal when everyone else is happy just listening to themselves talk. (Can you hear us now, Orioles?) So Scott McGuire, one of the young Turks on the state Task Force on Fisheries Management could hardly be faulted for expressing disappointment when his eager "I'm ready to get to work" was met with a verbal bucket of cold water and a lengthy tutorial on all things finned.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | April 6, 2008
Forty years ago next month, Tom Lewis and eight other Vietnam War protesters strode into the offices of U.S. Selective Service Board 33 in Catonsville and left a mark on history. The "Catonsville Nine" emptied file cabinets, hauled 600 draft records into the parking lot and burned them with homemade napalm. Then they prayed and waited to be arrested. That act of civil disobedience on May 17, 1968, inspired headlines - and more than 200 protests at draft board offices across the country.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 27, 2008
Why can't impatience be a virtue, too? I know, "Slow and steady wins the race," and "Rome wasn't built in a day." But we got to the moon because John F. Kennedy poked a stick in the placid behinds of Americans and the rocket establishment. Teams such as the Detroit Tigers get better because the guy with the checkbook OKs a blockbuster deal when everyone else is happy just listening to themselves talk. (Can you hear us now, Orioles?) So Scott McGuire, one of the young Turks on the state Task Force on Fisheries Management could hardly be faulted for expressing disappointment when his eager "I'm ready to get to work" was met with a verbal bucket of cold water and a lengthy tutorial on all things finned.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | July 10, 2005
BEFORE SENTENCING an Annapolis lobbyist a few years ago, U.S. District Court Judge J. Frederick Motz lamented what he called a culture of corruption in Annapolis. Judge Motz was presiding over a case in which one of the legislature's premier lobbyists was accused of manufacturing a threat - and then offering himself as the man who could make the threat go away. It was like a mechanic digging an axle-cracking pothole a few blocks from his repair shop. In the 2002 election, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. succeeded in part because he seemed anxious to change that culture.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2005
MUCH OF THE heavy lifting in government gets done by people about whom the public never hears. That's why the name Tom Lewis is not widely known outside a certain circle in Annapolis. For the past 11 years, Lewis, 48, has served as top aide to two speakers of the House of Delegates - spending eight years with Casper R. Taylor Jr. and, most recently, three years with Michael E. Busch. The position has made him one of the most powerful staffers in Annapolis. He has served as gatekeeper, negotiator and advocate.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 16, 1995
On the 19th floor of the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Co. building, Tom Lewis holds up an issue of People magazine and asks 20 young men if they think they might be able to find good role models therein."
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | May 23, 1993
Black and white images flickered across the screen.A group of neatly dressed men and women dumped papers from two wire baskets, poured liquid on the pile and set it alight.Joining hands, they prayed as the burning sheets danced into the air. The police arrived and took them to jail.Suddenly yesterday, it was May 17, 1968, again and the Catonsville Nine -- seven men and two women led by two Roman Catholic priests -- had invaded a Frederick Road Selective Service office and burned draft records using homemade napalm.
NEWS
November 7, 1990
ALABAMA1: Sonny Callahan, R (i)2: Bill Dickinson, R (i)3: Glen Browder, D (i)4: Tom Bevill, D (i)5: Bud Cramer, D6: Ben Erdreich, D (i)' 7: Claude Harris, D (i)ALASKA# No winner declared.ARIZONA1: John J. Rhodes III, R (i)2: Morris K. Udall, D (i)3: Bob Stump, R (i)4: Jon Kyl, R (i)# 5: Jim Kolbe, R (i)ARKANSAS1: Bill Alexander, D (i)2: Ray Thornton, D3: J.P. Hammerschmidt, R (i).` 4: Beryl F. Anthony Jr., D (i)CALIFORNIA1: No winner declared.2: Wally Herger, R (i)3: Robert T. Matsui, D (i)
NEWS
By Staff Report | April 30, 1993
A state police corporal from the Waterloo barracks wa injured on Interstate 95 near Jessup yesterday afternoon when his cruiser was rammed in the rear as he sat parked on the shoulder of the road after making a traffic stop, officials said.Investigators from Waterloo said Cpl. Tom Lewis received back, neck and foot injuries following the 4:40 p.m. accident on northbound I-95. The officer was treated and released at St. Agnes Hospital in Baltimore.Police said the collision occurred after a Ford Bronco hit a GMC truck and veered off the roadway and into Corporal Lewis' vehicle.
NEWS
November 7, 1990
ALABAMA1: Sonny Callahan, R (i)2: Bill Dickinson, R (i)3: Glen Browder, D (i)4: Tom Bevill, D (i)5: Bud Cramer, D6: Ben Erdreich, D (i)' 7: Claude Harris, D (i)ALASKA# No winner declared.ARIZONA1: John J. Rhodes III, R (i)2: Morris K. Udall, D (i)3: Bob Stump, R (i)4: Jon Kyl, R (i)# 5: Jim Kolbe, R (i)ARKANSAS1: Bill Alexander, D (i)2: Ray Thornton, D3: J.P. Hammerschmidt, R (i).` 4: Beryl F. Anthony Jr., D (i)CALIFORNIA1: No winner declared.2: Wally Herger, R (i)3: Robert T. Matsui, D (i)
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