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Tom Hayden

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By George F. Will | February 10, 1997
LOS ANGELES -- Tom Hayden hates it when people harp on his past. However, harp we must, because his candidacy for mayor here is interesting as a lagging cultural indicator. The last 30 years have not dealt gently with those who, like Mr. Hayden, thought they were surfing on the wave of the future.In 1967 he was 27 and the New Left personified, a paladin of ''participatory politics.'' The theory of romantic leftism was that the building of a New Jerusalem would be a majoritarian operation, with ''the people'' storming the ramparts of ''the establishment'' in order to defeat ''the system.
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NEWS
By Elaine Woo and Elaine Woo,Tribune Newspapers | January 29, 2010
J.D. Salinger, one of contemporary literature's most famous recluses, who created a lasting symbol of adolescent discontent in his 1951 novel "The Catcher in the Rye," died Wednesday. He was 91. Mr. Salinger died of natural causes at his home in Cornish, N.H., his son Matthew said in a statement from the author's longtime literary agency, Harold Ober Associates, which made the announcement on behalf of Mr. Salinger's family. Perhaps no other writer of so few works generated as much popular and critical interest as Mr. Salinger, who published one novel, three authorized collections of short stories and an additional 21 stories that appeared in magazines only in the 1940s.
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NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND AND JUlES WITCOVER | March 7, 1997
LOS ANGELES -- Before a government class at the Los Angeles Mission Community College the other night, state Sen. Tom Hayden was doing what he has been doing all his adolescent and adult life: organizing students for political action -- this time in his own behalf as a long-shot candidate for mayor of Los Angeles.Now 57 years old and a veteran of 15 years in the California Legislature, Mr. Hayden is still selling grass-roots democracy, just as he did as a founder of the Students for a Democratic Society in the 1960s, a civil-rights soldier and protester against the Vietnam war. On this night, he patiently talked 35 student volunteers through the basics of neighborhood organizing, which he himself learned in the streets of Newark, New Jersey, in the '60s.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 13, 2002
Barbershop has all the earmarks of one of those crass urban comedies that too often pass for entertainment, films where anything goes when it comes to getting a laugh (the fouler the language and the more body parts involved, the better), where screaming is disguised as acting and attitude is everything. Thankfully, the film is so much more. At its core a big-hearted riff on friendship, family and the faith that things can always get better, it spotlights a gifted ensemble cast where it's folly to debate who outshines whom and a celebratory spirit that refuses to stoop to least-common-denominator humor.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 5, 2001
LOS ANGELES - His ex-wife, Jane Fonda, has found religion and divorced her latest husband. His most famous co-defendants in the Chicago Seven trial, the courtroom confrontation between anti-Vietnam War protesters and the establishment, are dead. And Tom Hayden himself? At 61, he's still thinking globally. The former 1960s radical is a marquee speaker at protest rallies against global trade. But time and circumstance are forcing him to act more locally than ever before. Barred by term limits from remaining in the California legislature, he's fighting hard for a seat on the Los Angeles City Council in today's runoff election.
NEWS
By Elaine Woo and Tribune Newspapers | January 29, 2010
J.D. Salinger, one of contemporary literature's most famous recluses, who created a lasting symbol of adolescent discontent in his 1951 novel "The Catcher in the Rye," died Wednesday. He was 91. Mr. Salinger died of natural causes at his home in Cornish, N.H., his son Matthew said in a statement from the author's longtime literary agency, Harold Ober Associates, which made the announcement on behalf of Mr. Salinger's family. Perhaps no other writer of so few works generated as much popular and critical interest as Mr. Salinger, who published one novel, three authorized collections of short stories and an additional 21 stories that appeared in magazines only in the 1940s.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 13, 2002
Barbershop has all the earmarks of one of those crass urban comedies that too often pass for entertainment, films where anything goes when it comes to getting a laugh (the fouler the language and the more body parts involved, the better), where screaming is disguised as acting and attitude is everything. Thankfully, the film is so much more. At its core a big-hearted riff on friendship, family and the faith that things can always get better, it spotlights a gifted ensemble cast where it's folly to debate who outshines whom and a celebratory spirit that refuses to stoop to least-common-denominator humor.
NEWS
July 16, 1993
Patrick LippertLed Rock the Vote moveLOS ANGELES -- Patrick Lippert, the leader of last year's celebrated Rock the Vote campaign to sign up MTV-generation voters, died of acquired immune deficiency syndrome complications Tuesday. He was 35.In 1991, Mr. Lippert became executive director of Rock the Vote, which relied heavily on MTV in registering 350,000 people.Mr. Lippert worked in the state Assembly campaign of Tom Hayden, now a state senator. He later became director of a Hollywood political action group created by Mr. Hayden and Jane Fonda, then his wife.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 6, 1999
NO ONE ANSWERS the telephone at Washington, D.C., radio station WARW these days. It just rings and rings, for about 30 to 40 times, and then a busy signal kicks in. Folks at WARW must not be in a talking mood.Until the end of February, Doug Tracht worked at WARW. He was a shock jock known as "Greaseman." The day after the Grammy Awards show, Greaseman played a sound bite of one of hip-hop artist Lauryn Hill's songs. At the end of the bite, Greaseman said, "No wonder people drag them behind trucks."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | April 5, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- State Treasurer Kathleen Brown, speaking to the California Lawyers for Human Rights the other night, said of her campaign for governor: "You will hear things about me that will burn your ears. You know what they're saying: I'm the sister of Jerry Brown! I am -- and I'm proud of it."The liberal audience of the gay men and lesbian organization applauded with an enthusiasm that matched their laughter. They did so again as she also owned up to being the daughter of former Gov. Pat Brown.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 5, 2001
LOS ANGELES - His ex-wife, Jane Fonda, has found religion and divorced her latest husband. His most famous co-defendants in the Chicago Seven trial, the courtroom confrontation between anti-Vietnam War protesters and the establishment, are dead. And Tom Hayden himself? At 61, he's still thinking globally. The former 1960s radical is a marquee speaker at protest rallies against global trade. But time and circumstance are forcing him to act more locally than ever before. Barred by term limits from remaining in the California legislature, he's fighting hard for a seat on the Los Angeles City Council in today's runoff election.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND AND JUlES WITCOVER | March 7, 1997
LOS ANGELES -- Before a government class at the Los Angeles Mission Community College the other night, state Sen. Tom Hayden was doing what he has been doing all his adolescent and adult life: organizing students for political action -- this time in his own behalf as a long-shot candidate for mayor of Los Angeles.Now 57 years old and a veteran of 15 years in the California Legislature, Mr. Hayden is still selling grass-roots democracy, just as he did as a founder of the Students for a Democratic Society in the 1960s, a civil-rights soldier and protester against the Vietnam war. On this night, he patiently talked 35 student volunteers through the basics of neighborhood organizing, which he himself learned in the streets of Newark, New Jersey, in the '60s.
NEWS
By George F. Will | February 10, 1997
LOS ANGELES -- Tom Hayden hates it when people harp on his past. However, harp we must, because his candidacy for mayor here is interesting as a lagging cultural indicator. The last 30 years have not dealt gently with those who, like Mr. Hayden, thought they were surfing on the wave of the future.In 1967 he was 27 and the New Left personified, a paladin of ''participatory politics.'' The theory of romantic leftism was that the building of a New Jerusalem would be a majoritarian operation, with ''the people'' storming the ramparts of ''the establishment'' in order to defeat ''the system.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 21, 1997
SANTA ANA, Calif. -- Although accused of helping to steal human eggs and embryos from women and implant them in others, Dr. Sergio Stone faces mail fraud charges when his trial begins today.That he will not be charged in the alleged conspiracy to misuse the eggs and embryos of couples desperately trying to have children has angered many.But there is a good reason why Stone, along with two other doctors from the now-closed University of California Irvine Center for Reproductive Health, face no criminal charges for reproductive theft.
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