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By GEORGE F. WILL | September 9, 1991
Washington. -- Tom Harkin, 51 and feeling free and itching for fun, plans to have fun hammering George Bush's ''clay feet.'' The only Iowa Democrat ever re-elected to the Senate, he plans to be the Democrats' Reagan, storming the presidency by reviving his party's fundamentalism.Republicans dismiss him as the Democrats' Goldwater, a kamikaze candidate they want to see nominated. But in 1966 California Gov. Pat Brown and in 1980 President Carter felt that way about Mr. Reagan.Mr. Harkin says victory can come from turning out non-voters who supposedly are mostly Democrats waiting to be stirred by a fire-and-brimstone liberal.
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NEWS
By Daniel de Vise, The Washington Post | March 27, 2012
The chairman of the U.S. Senate education committee asked the chancellor of Maryland's state university system Monday to hand over records on enrollment and workplace practices at the University of Maryland University College, where president Susan Aldridge resigned last week. Aldridge, 60, offered no specific reason Thursday for stepping down as president of the nation's largest public online college, with more than 90,000 students studying globally. But she left amid mounting complaints from current and former employees about the workplace environment and academic priorities at the Adelphi institution.
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NEWS
By Jack W.Germond and Jules Witcover | February 7, 1992
Manchester,N.H. -- SEN. TOM HARKIN, the Iowan who has literally worked his way through a long and successful political career, went to work the other day as a history teacher at Manchester West High School as part of his campaign to win New Hampshire's Feb. 18 Democratic presidential primary.It was, by his count, his 109th "work day" since 1974 as a congressional candidate, congressman, senator and now presidential candidate, taking on a real job to put himself in the shoes of voters and get a better idea of what they have to cope with.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 2004
CUMMING, Iowa - The most sought-after Democratic caucus-goer in Iowa is agonizing in this hamlet of 150, torn over whether to make what could be the most important endorsement in the state's still shifting presidential contest. "As we sit here right now, I honestly don't know what I'm going to do," said Sen. Tom Harkin, whose support, in Iowa at least, has the potential to vastly overshadow endorsements by Al Gore, Bill Bradley or just about anyone else. "I am being pulled in a couple of different ways.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | September 17, 1991
AS THE latest 1992 Democratic hopeful tossed his hat into the ring on a farm here the other day, supporters held a large sign that proclaimed: "Sen. Tom Harkin for President, Iowa's Harry Truman."The crowd of Iowa faithful who listened to Harkin needed no explanation as he conjured up memories of Truman's 1948 give-'em-hell style that upset Republican Tom Dewey, launching red-meat assault on President Bush, the man he hopes to face as the Democratic nominee a year from now.The pointed comparison with Truman started from the moment Harkin held up a new campaign T-shirt that said "Give-Em-Hell Harkin" and then immediately declared: "There are those who say that we're a long shot, that we might just as well call the election off, that George Herbert Walker Bush is so popular he can't be beat.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond AND Jules Witcover | July 30, 1991
Manchester, N.H.-- TOM HARKIN practices the politics of absolution. He is telling his fellow Democrats that they have no reason to feel guilty about their liberal traditions."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | May 20, 1991
WashingtonIOWA DEMOCRATS have been complaining about the absence of serious presidential candidates to compete in their kickoff 1992 precinct caucuses next February. Well, they may have one hopeful in their very midst who could make those caucuses irrelevant in next year's political scheme of things.Iowa's Democratic junior senator, Tom Harkin, is moving around the country preaching the old liberal Democratic gospel and, he says, being urged by those who hear him to take the message to the voters as a presidential candidate.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | August 4, 1991
NASHUA, N.H. -- Paul E. Tsongas, the only announced major Democratic candidate in the 1992 presidential race, has decided to concentrate on the New Hampshire primary instead of the Iowa caucuses.The shift was revealed last week when Mr. Tsongas' Iowa field director, Emily Smith, announced her resignation. She said that the Iowa race had changed because Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin would probably run. Mr. Tsongas changed strategies, she said, because Mr. Harkin could win "90 percent of the vote" in the Iowa caucuses.
NEWS
March 10, 1992
Iowa's Sen. Tom Harkin and Nebraska's Sen. Bob Kerrey, both of whom have now dropped out of the presidential race, had a lot in common. Both are from sparsely populated Midwestern farm states. Both have relatively liberal voting records. And both voted themselves a hefty pay raise in the now infamous sneak late night roll call last summer. That spectacle -- which so emphasized their "Washington-ness" -- probably hurt them more than their liberal voting records.But make no mistake about it, their liberalism hurt.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 15, 1991
THE NATION'S seven commercial and public television networks, in an unprecedented move that will bring greater attention to Democrats seeking their party's presidential nomination in 1992, have agreed to televise at least seven prime-time debates among the party's candidates.The first debate will be broadcast by NBC in Washington Dec. 15 and others will follow as the nominating process unfolds, it was announced yesterday. CNN has scheduled the second debate for Feb. 16 at St. Anselm's College in Manchester, N.H.In addition to NBC, the debate agreement involves CBS, ABC, CNN, Fox, PBS and C-SPAN.
NEWS
May 25, 2001
Imagine a boat crowded with 100 well-dressed men and women as the crew. Imagine them sitting 50 to a side, their captain standing to starboard - the right. The boat lists slightly to the right. A member of the crew - a 67-year old Vermonter, as it happens - crossed the deck yesterday. He will thereby alter the ship's course. Sen. James M. Jeffords, Vermont's three-term senator, announced he was leaving the Republican Party and becoming an independent who will support the Democrats on organizational matters.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 22, 2000
WASHINGTON - About 50 top contractors have kept getting government money despite guilty pleas or settlements in civil and criminal fraud cases since 1995, according to a recent General Accounting Office study. Whether prospective contractors should be penalized for fraud or violating labor, environmental and other federal regulations is a hot Capitol Hill issue these days, pitting Republicans in Congress against the Clinton administration and big business against big labor. The general idea of contractor reform was to allow federal agencies to deny business to contractors that lack a satisfactory record of integrity and business ethics, according to the proposal.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 24, 1997
WASHINGTON -- There was appropriate irony in the fact that when Paul Tsongas died the other day at 55 the political focus was on the second inaugural of President Clinton. It was not the first time the expansive politician from Arkansas had overshadowed Mr. Tsongas.He should not be allowed to pass into political history, however, without more attention being paid. He was one of those rare politicians who had a significant influence on the national debate without ever holding a significant center of national power.
NEWS
January 12, 1993
President-elect Clinton should drop his election-year pledge of a middle-class tax cut before he takes office. Two of his major opponents in the Democratic primaries -- Paul Tsongas and Tom Harkin -- denounced the idea from its inception, and they were right. It makes little difference that President Bush used phony figures to underestimate the deficit during the campaign. His numbers, like those projected by Governor Clinton, were suspect all along. Both candidates made promises they couldn't deliver on.Mr.
NEWS
December 17, 1992
OUR FRIEND, the Curmudgeonly Iconoclast, stormed into th office spluttering and harrumphing as usual. Fixing us with a stentorian stare, he offered his judgment of the day: "I am sick and tired of all those people who said the presidential campaign was too long."Since we were one of the miscreants, we just asked for elucidation."Well, it's the bloody Brits," old C.I. declared. "They have brainwashed us poor colonials into thinking that their parliamentary democracy with its nice short six-week campaigns vastly superior to our presidential republic and its year-long gasathons.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | June 23, 1992
EVERY four years the ritual mating dance between Jesse Jackson and the Democratic presidential candidate is exquisitely choreographed as the "Romeo and Juliet" ballet.And with the same doomed finale.Mr. Jackson danced with Fritz Mondale -- one tantalizing step forward, one step back -- all the way to the 1984 Reagan landslide.His tango with Mike Dukakis was more torturous. Mr. Jackson bickered with Mr. Dukakis and aides through endless meetings, pouted when he was snubbed in favor of Lloyd Bentsen as V.P. choice, then made a 50-minute convention spellbinder in which he gave Mr. Dukakis one cool paragraph.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | March 2, 1992
An article in yesterday's Sun incorrectly stated that Sen. Tom Harkin telephoned the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson to apologize after Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton was harshly critical of Mr. Jackson upon being erroneously told that Mr. Jackson was endorsing Mr. Harkin. It was Mr. Clinton who made the call.* The Sun regrets the error.The Rev. Jesse L. Jackson took to the pulpit yesterday and urged the Democratic presidential candidates to stop attacking one another and start talking about those that have been left behind: America's cities, industries and family farms.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 25, 1992
He only explodes like that when his sinuses are unbearably painful.-- A former aide explaining Bill Clinton's occasional flashes of anger.In an effort to reinvigorate his campaign and seize the all-important allergy sufferers' vote, Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton yesterday detailed a long history of sinus problems that he said had made his life "a living hell -- especially in the spring."It hurts right here," said the Arkansas governor at a hastily called news conference, pointing to an area of his forehead above both eyebrows.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Washington Bureau | March 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Eating dinner with a reporter in San Diego last spring, Paul Tsongas recounted his appearance with Sen. Tom Harkin at a candidate cattle show in Wisconsin a few days earlier. The Iowa Democrat, Mr. Tsongas said, was really worked up to fever pitch."He was so emotional," the former Massachusetts senator said, "he actually said, 'Bull - - - -.' "The fact is, of course, that Mr. Harkin's use of the expletive in his speeches was more of a shtick than a reflection of any emotion -- something he did in every speech in an attempt to gain attention in that early stage of the campaign.
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