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By Jack Mathews and Jack Mathews,Newsday | January 26, 1994
Though it was only recently announced that Billy Crystal would not be returning for a fifth year as host of the Academy Awards telecast, Hollywood insiders say the producers of the show have been searching for his replacement for more than a month and they have already been turned down by such personable luminaries as Bette Midler, Steve Martin, Whoopi Goldberg and host emeritus Johnny Carson.Gilbert Cates, who began producing the show the first year Mr. Crystal appeared, would not comment on his search for a new host, but just two years ago, he had the perfect candidate all set and ready to step in if Mr. Crystal, bedridden with the flu, had been unable to make it to the stage.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 15, 2009
You know him, you love him - Tom Hanks!" said David Letterman on Monday night as he called the Everyman superstar to the stage. But how well do we know him? What makes Tom Hanks run? That question races through your mind during the technologically phenomenal yet otherwise middling antics of Angels & Demons, the sequel to The Da Vinci Code. Although it's come out second, it's based on the first Dan Brown thriller to center on Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon, an academic with a habit of butting heads with zealots.
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By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | January 2, 1994
When Tom Hanks played a caustic, unlovable stand-up comic in the movie "Punchline," some fans worried that the actor might hurt his good-guy image and, in the process, kill his career.Of course, they said the same thing after "The Bonfire of the Vanities," but that's another story.Well, here he goes again in "Philadelphia." This is his most courageous and challenging movie role, and fans and critics are divided on how he will fare.People are not sure whether the role will ruin his career or win him an Oscar.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | November 25, 2008
Starring Russell Crowe, Tom Hanks, Kurt Russell Directed by Ron Howard Universal Home Video $39.98 *** 1/2 Ron Howard is far from Hollywood's most consistent director. He can be awful, as in 2000's charmless The Grinch. But when he's on, he's very on. This four-film, eight-disc collection, filled with deleted scenes, documentaries and other extras, brings together two of his best, 2001's A Beautiful Mind, which won a Best Picture Oscar, and 1995's Apollo 13, which should have. It includes the middling Backdraft (1991)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 2000
"Cast Away" proves a number of things, all of them good. It proves that Tom Hanks is indisputably the surest, most dependable -- if not the best -- actor of his generation. It proves that director Robert Zemeckis ("Forrest Gump," "Contact") can make a great film, one that doesn't rely on gimmicks or trickery. And it proves that a volleyball can command the screen like no one thought possible. "Cast Away" -- and that two-word, not one-word, title is key to understanding this film -- takes the worlds of "Gilligan's Island" and "Robinson Crusoe" and blows them apart.
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 2000
NEW YORK - Tom Hanks walks into a subterranean room of the Four Seasons Hotel with all the fanfare of a busboy. He has no entourage. He does not crackle with "I'm here" energy. He holds a tall Starbucks coffee and orders an egg-white omelet with American cheese. If he were at home in Malibu on this morning, he might be surfing with "Brentwood housewives," he says, exchanging a hello or a nod between sets. Here at breakfast, Hanks is just as unassuming before he begins a one-day, three-city promotional blitz for his survivalist saga, "Cast Away," opening tomorrow.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 18, 1998
The results are in. Lightning can't strike twice.Nora Ephron, who made the overpraised but widely adored "Sleepless in Seattle," has re-convened the magic couple of Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan for the romantic comedy "You've Got Mail." The result may deserve top honors as this year's most egregious cinematic travesty. This ungainly remake of Ernst Lubitsch's 1940 romance "The Shop Around the Corner" commits the unforgiveable sin of attempting to improve on perfection. Indeed, between "Meet Joe Black," "Psycho" and now this, Hollywood obviously needs to be reminded of a timeless verity: it's the bad movies that need to be remade, you idiots, not the good ones.
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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1995
He curses. He smokes pot. He dreads calling his weepy mom. He ends up in jail, outer space, a mental hospital, and in the French Quarter with a stripper named Wanda and an ape named Sue.Meet the real Forrest Gump. Not the "Forrest Gump" that has made more than $300 million at the box office and is expected to dominate tonight's Academy Awards ceremony.The movie, which is up for Best Picture and 12 other Oscars, took the main character from an obscure book, sanitized him and transformed him in to a cultural phenomenon.
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October 1, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Tom Hanks is among the narrators as the documentary The War recounts the attack on Pearl Harbor (8 p.m., MPT, Channels 22/67).
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 21, 2007
When it's really bubbling, Charlie Wilson's War brings Broadway fizz to D.C., Houston and Cairo cocktail parties. It keeps you curious and amused for 97 minutes. But like many a cocktail party, it has an upside and a downside. It might refresh you after ponderous events or "event films" - but still leave you longing for more long-lasting experiences. It stars Tom Hanks, almost back to loose, wisecracking form, as a sybaritic East Texas congressman who uses his connections and committee positions to wangle funding for the Afghan rebels during the Soviet invasion.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 16, 2008
The leading man is a short, bald, pot-bellied lawyer with a passion for reading Latin and a habit of making enemies. The leading lady quotes Shakespeare, dresses modestly and seldom looks like she's having fun. The opening hour unfolds against a backdrop of mud, snow and the endless gray of a New England winter. And all seven hours are filled with talk in historically accurate English accents about big ideas from the 18th century like life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. This is not exactly the stuff of which TV miniseries are usually made.
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January 19, 2008
Critic's Pick -- Unauthorized to enter the U.S., a European man (Tom Hanks) begins living in a N.Y. airport in The Terminal (8 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2).
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 21, 2007
When it's really bubbling, Charlie Wilson's War brings Broadway fizz to D.C., Houston and Cairo cocktail parties. It keeps you curious and amused for 97 minutes. But like many a cocktail party, it has an upside and a downside. It might refresh you after ponderous events or "event films" - but still leave you longing for more long-lasting experiences. It stars Tom Hanks, almost back to loose, wisecracking form, as a sybaritic East Texas congressman who uses his connections and committee positions to wangle funding for the Afghan rebels during the Soviet invasion.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 16, 2007
WHAT DID the 11 members of the jury in the Princess Diana inquest learn from their trip to Paris and visit to the Alma tunnel? They stayed inside for 15 minutes looking at the gouged-out notorious 13th pillar, which still has chunks of concrete missing and shows the steel rods underneath. That's where Diana's Mercedes hit. They also walked farther up the tunnel and looked back to the entrance, seeing the famous "black spot" as the road curves into the tunnel. This may have contributed to chauffeur Henri Paul losing control of the limousine.
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By Brooke Nevils and Brooke Nevils,Sun Reporter | June 10, 2007
I'm not going to lie: a key factor in my decision to come to college in Baltimore was the movie Sleepless in Seattle. Annie, Meg Ryan's character, is a Baltimore Sun reporter who inexplicably falls in love with a complete stranger - played by Tom Hanks - whom she hears on the radio. Convinced she's losing her mind, she seeks the advice of her brother, a professor at the Johns Hopkins University portrayed hilariously by David Hyde Pierce. Because of the movie, I came to the Johns Hopkins University and became an intern at the Sun. Sleepless in Seattle aside, I knew little else about Baltimore when I moved here four years ago. My first introduction to it was hardly as endearing as the film.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW AND CHRIS KALTENBACH and MICHAEL SRAGOW AND CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITICS | June 16, 2006
Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach, except where noted. Full reviews at baltimoresun.com/movies. Akeelah and the Bee -- follows a formula, one of the oldest in all of fiction: an underdog, struggling against the odds, seeks fame, fortune and - most importantly - self-respect. But this is one of the most winning movies of 2006 in its abundance of great intentions. (C.K.) PG 112 minutes B+ An Inconvenient Truth -- is more than a documentary of Al Gore's dynamic traveling slide show about global warming.
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By Dallas Morning News | February 6, 1994
Midway through Jonathan Demme's film "Philadelphia," there is a supercharged scene in which Andrew Beckett (played by actor Tom Hanks) attempts to explain to his lawyer, Joe Miller (Denzel Washington), what opera means to him.As Maria Callas' recording of "La mamma morta" from Giordano's "Andrea Chenier" begins softly in the background and then swells to fill the theater, Andrew translates the words and conveys the passions and emotional meanings behind this operatic excerpt.It is the most vividly remembered moment after the drama has been played out and the film has ended; so much so that record stores nationally have had a recent run on Callas' recordings.
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June 2, 2006
WORLD Powers agree on Iran proposals World powers said yesterday that they have agreed on a set of "far-reaching proposals" to entice Iran to suspend its enrichment of uranium, which could be used for nuclear weapons, and to punish Tehran if it refuses. pg 1a Quake death toll continues rise With as many as 500 people dying each day from injuries that they suffered during Saturday's earthquake in Indonesia, the death toll from the earthquake has surpassed 6,200, and it is likely to continue to increase.
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