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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 17, 1992
Bill just found out the brass who have to make it work say his policy on gays in the military wouldn't. Big surprise.This administration can get something done if Bill will lead where Tom Foley doesn't.
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NEWS
By Eric D. Fingerhut | December 27, 1994
CLEVELAND -- LOSING CANDIDATES are supposed to accept the blame for their defeat and then maintain a dignified silence.I accept the blame, but as a victim of the so-called slaughter of the innocents -- reform-minded Democratic freshman of the 103rd Congress who were defeated for re-election on Nov. 8 -- I cannot stay silent.am angry. Not at the voters who chose someone else to represent them. That is their privilege.Not at the Republicans, who were simply doing their job in our adversarial, two-party system.
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NEWS
By Ralph Nader | October 19, 1990
YOU'VE probably seen House Speaker Tom Foley on television recently answering a question or two on the progress of budget negotiations with the White House. He looks like a graying, friendly uncle who is a voice for moderation and kindliness -- even toward his political opponents -- the Republicans.That's the public Tom Foley. The political infighter who presides over the House of Representatives is quite another Tom Foley. Listen to the self-styled "tough guy" in the House -- James A. Traficant Jr., D-Ohio.
NEWS
September 26, 1994
It has been 134 years since a speaker of the House of Representatives lost a re-election bid. After last Tuesday's voting in the state of Washington, some political analysts believe it may happen again this year.Washington has an open primary in which all candidates from both parties run against each other. The highest finisher from each party gets the nominations. Speaker Tom Foley was the only Democrat, and got 35 percent of the vote. A Republican won a four-way race with 30 percent. Considering that in 1992 Mr. Foley increased his primary vote by only 2 percentage points in the general election, Democrats are apprehensive.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 3, 1991
SPOKANE, Wash. -- Like many folks here in Representative Thomas S. Foley's home town, Shawn Peroff thinks the House speaker is just "great."But on Tuesday, he'll vote for a measure that would send his congressman into involuntary retirement in 1994."
NEWS
September 26, 1994
It has been 134 years since a speaker of the House of Representatives lost a re-election bid. After last Tuesday's voting in the state of Washington, some political analysts believe it may happen again this year.Washington has an open primary in which all candidates from both parties run against each other. The highest finisher from each party gets the nominations. Speaker Tom Foley was the only Democrat, and got 35 percent of the vote. A Republican won a four-way race with 30 percent. Considering that in 1992 Mr. Foley increased his primary vote by only 2 percentage points in the general election, Democrats are apprehensive.
NEWS
By Eric D. Fingerhut | December 27, 1994
CLEVELAND -- LOSING CANDIDATES are supposed to accept the blame for their defeat and then maintain a dignified silence.I accept the blame, but as a victim of the so-called slaughter of the innocents -- reform-minded Democratic freshman of the 103rd Congress who were defeated for re-election on Nov. 8 -- I cannot stay silent.am angry. Not at the voters who chose someone else to represent them. That is their privilege.Not at the Republicans, who were simply doing their job in our adversarial, two-party system.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Members of Congress, and particularly House Speaker Tom Foley, no doubt are breathing easier in the (( wake of a federal judge's decision in Foley's home state of Washington throwing out term limits imposed by the voters in 1992.Foley would have had to give up his House seat in 1998 as the result of a ballot initiative approved 15 months ago. But the judge ruled that the state may not impose qualifications beyond those of age, citizenship and state residency stipulated in the Constitution.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | March 17, 1991
Washington--So here it is St. Paddy's Day, when even good fellows who aren't Irish wear green ties and pretend, giving themselves a fine excuse to celebrate alongside those whose roots run back to the Auld Sod.In dedicated Irish pubs in New York, Boston and elsewhere, sentimental drinkers drop more cash this time of year into the bar-top kitties ostensibly collecting funds for the waifs and widows of Northern Ireland. Late of an evening, a glass is raised here and there to the Irish Republican Army -- all in good fun, of course.
NEWS
November 16, 1990
Having botched the budget, will the Washington Establishment now kill the credibility of a U.S. military threat against Iraq? The recent performance of the White House and, more especially, certain elements in Congress has been dismaying. Although the rhetoric rings with constitutional argument and with compassion for our forces in the sands of Araby, some of the maneuvering has been crassly political or backside protective.Of all the balloons floated, the one most deserving of the quick puncture it got was the idea of calling an emergency session of Congress.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Members of Congress, and particularly House Speaker Tom Foley, no doubt are breathing easier in the (( wake of a federal judge's decision in Foley's home state of Washington throwing out term limits imposed by the voters in 1992.Foley would have had to give up his House seat in 1998 as the result of a ballot initiative approved 15 months ago. But the judge ruled that the state may not impose qualifications beyond those of age, citizenship and state residency stipulated in the Constitution.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 17, 1992
Bill just found out the brass who have to make it work say his policy on gays in the military wouldn't. Big surprise.This administration can get something done if Bill will lead where Tom Foley doesn't.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | November 8, 1991
Washington -- Opponents of term limitations for elected officials are gleefully pointing to the upset rejection of the sweeping Washington state initiative on the subject as a stake through the heart of the whole idea. But this particular vampire probably will keep walking when the sun goes down.There are two obvious reasons for this prognosis. The Washington initiative failed because it was entirely too punitive for voters' tastes and its proponents committed a colossal political blunder that probably won't and can't be duplicated in other states.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 3, 1991
SPOKANE, Wash. -- Like many folks here in Representative Thomas S. Foley's home town, Shawn Peroff thinks the House speaker is just "great."But on Tuesday, he'll vote for a measure that would send his congressman into involuntary retirement in 1994."
NEWS
By ALAN EHRENHALT | August 18, 1991
Someone has been using Connecticut to try to teach us all a lesson.All summer long, that unlucky state has suffered through a budget and tax deadlock that has just about paralyzed its government. To those in the middle of it, trying to find a solution, it is a nightmare that never seems to end. But to some with long memories, it is an irony almost too rich to be coincidental.For nearly all of this century, Connecticut was the model of political discipline and obedience, the state where office-holders and voters alike did as they were told.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | March 17, 1991
Washington--So here it is St. Paddy's Day, when even good fellows who aren't Irish wear green ties and pretend, giving themselves a fine excuse to celebrate alongside those whose roots run back to the Auld Sod.In dedicated Irish pubs in New York, Boston and elsewhere, sentimental drinkers drop more cash this time of year into the bar-top kitties ostensibly collecting funds for the waifs and widows of Northern Ireland. Late of an evening, a glass is raised here and there to the Irish Republican Army -- all in good fun, of course.
NEWS
By ALAN EHRENHALT | August 18, 1991
Someone has been using Connecticut to try to teach us all a lesson.All summer long, that unlucky state has suffered through a budget and tax deadlock that has just about paralyzed its government. To those in the middle of it, trying to find a solution, it is a nightmare that never seems to end. But to some with long memories, it is an irony almost too rich to be coincidental.For nearly all of this century, Connecticut was the model of political discipline and obedience, the state where office-holders and voters alike did as they were told.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | November 8, 1991
Washington -- Opponents of term limitations for elected officials are gleefully pointing to the upset rejection of the sweeping Washington state initiative on the subject as a stake through the heart of the whole idea. But this particular vampire probably will keep walking when the sun goes down.There are two obvious reasons for this prognosis. The Washington initiative failed because it was entirely too punitive for voters' tastes and its proponents committed a colossal political blunder that probably won't and can't be duplicated in other states.
NEWS
November 16, 1990
Having botched the budget, will the Washington Establishment now kill the credibility of a U.S. military threat against Iraq? The recent performance of the White House and, more especially, certain elements in Congress has been dismaying. Although the rhetoric rings with constitutional argument and with compassion for our forces in the sands of Araby, some of the maneuvering has been crassly political or backside protective.Of all the balloons floated, the one most deserving of the quick puncture it got was the idea of calling an emergency session of Congress.
NEWS
By Ralph Nader | October 19, 1990
YOU'VE probably seen House Speaker Tom Foley on television recently answering a question or two on the progress of budget negotiations with the White House. He looks like a graying, friendly uncle who is a voice for moderation and kindliness -- even toward his political opponents -- the Republicans.That's the public Tom Foley. The political infighter who presides over the House of Representatives is quite another Tom Foley. Listen to the self-styled "tough guy" in the House -- James A. Traficant Jr., D-Ohio.
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