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NEWS
April 29, 2005
HOUSE SPEAKER Dennis Hastert's decision to retreat this week on ethics changes apparently designed to protect his majority leader, Tom DeLay, was a bow to the inevitable. Republican rank-and-file members were hearing from constituents who may not give a fig about Tom DeLay or particular ethics requirements but detected an odor from Washington they didn't like. By giving in to demands from Democrats that unilateral changes in the bipartisan process be dropped, the speaker moved to take the wind out of a controversy that has overshadowed other House business and threatened to tar all of its members.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 16, 2013
Wednesday afternoon, as his former colleagues in Congress considered a deal to avoid a national crisis, Wayne Gilchrest sat in his office in a place called Knocks Folly on Maryland's Eastern Shore and watched a fox run across a field. That's not a bad way to spend an autumn afternoon — gazing out the window of an 18th-century house in Kent County, resting after a day spent preparing for the arrival of schoolchildren eager to plant trees or paddle a canoe on the Sassafras River.
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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The man behind the impeachment of President Clinton is not one of the television-ready Republican stars in the Monica Lewinsky saga, but rather a pugnacious former pest exterminator from Sugar Land, Texas, known on Capitol Hill as "The Hammer."Rep. Tom DeLay, the third-ranking House Republican leader, more than any other member has slammed the door on any House vote on a censure resolution and left lawmakers with no choice but to impeach Clinton or let him off the hook.A born-again Christian who says he considers Clinton's abuses an outrage, DeLay pushed for impeachment even after the midterm elections suggested that the issue was dead.
NEWS
September 29, 2005
When it comes to the raw use of political power, no one in Washington has been more successful during the past decade than Texas Republican Rep. Tom DeLay. Others may have shaped his party's message and offered its vision to voters. But it fell to the former exterminator from Sugarland to oversee the nuts-and-bolts logistics of getting candidates elected and bills passed. He was particularly good at greasing the machine with cash from favor-seekers. This skill, and his willingness to push ethics restrictions and campaign finance laws to the breaking point, helped Mr. DeLay radically change the face of Texas politics and rewrite the playbook in Washington as well.
NEWS
September 29, 2005
When it comes to the raw use of political power, no one in Washington has been more successful during the past decade than Texas Republican Rep. Tom DeLay. Others may have shaped his party's message and offered its vision to voters. But it fell to the former exterminator from Sugarland to oversee the nuts-and-bolts logistics of getting candidates elected and bills passed. He was particularly good at greasing the machine with cash from favor-seekers. This skill, and his willingness to push ethics restrictions and campaign finance laws to the breaking point, helped Mr. DeLay radically change the face of Texas politics and rewrite the playbook in Washington as well.
NEWS
May 25, 1996
BOB DOLE can hardly wait to escape the Senate before he is personally humiliated on the minimum wage issue, and who can blame him. In his political soul, he probably realized early on that House Republican leaders were leading their party over the cliff by opposing a 90-cent increase in the $4.15-an-hour wage floor.Now that the GOP debacle has come in the House, where 93 Republicans defected, the Senate's time will come. Democrats there have the happy choice of beating up on Mr. Dole while he is still around or letting the issue gnaw at Republicans as elections approach.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 7, 2001
WASHINGTON -- With the House and Senate split on whether airport screeners should be federal employees or private company employees supervised by the feds, the blame game for not taking the necessary steps to prevent a future terrorist hijacking is already well under way. While congressional Democrats continue to press for full federalization and the Republicans hold out for the semi-private route, incidents like the one at O'Hare Airport in Chicago the...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - A legal defense fund established by Tom DeLay, the House majority leader, has sharply expanded its fund-raising effort in recent months, taking in more than $250,000 since the indictment last fall of two of his closest political operatives in Texas, according to DeLay's latest financial disclosure statements. The list of recent donors includes dozens of DeLay's House Republican colleagues, including two lawmakers who were placed on the House ethics committee this year, and several of the nation's largest corporations and their executives.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - For two decades, Rep. Tom DeLay has worked to build an empire on conservative ideals, bare-knuckle politics and an enormous talent for fund raising. Now, as controversy swirls around him, all those things are helping him keep his party together - and keep his job. Always a polarizing figure inside the Beltway, DeLay - the House Republican majority leader - is under fire for his fund-raising practices, his ties to lobbyists and his alleged ethical lapses in accepting foreign trips.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writers Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman contributed to this article | December 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Some conservative lawmakers sought to put the brakes on an accelerating movement in the Senate toward censure yesterday, urging senators to first review documents that detail President Clinton's alleged relationships with womenother than Monica Lewinsky.Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee who would serve as prosecutors in a Senate trial have not ruled out using that evidence to make their case for conviction, said Michelle R. Morgan, a committee spokeswoman.The committee had not explicitly cited those documents in drafting the impeachment charges of perjury and obstruction of justice that the full House approved Saturday.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 12, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Washington lobbyist Jack Abramoff was indicted yesterday on federal fraud charges that accused him and an associate of using a counterfeit $23 million wire transfer to get financing to buy a fleet of casino boats five years ago. Abramoff, formerly a powerful and highly paid lobbyist who boasted of his ties to House Majority Leader Tom DeLay and others, also is under investigation by a separate federal grand jury for his dealings with...
FEATURES
By Josh Brown and Josh Brown,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 28, 2005
WASHINGTON - House Majority Leader Tom DeLay has a new role: reluctant pop icon. On Wednesday's installment of NBC's Law & Order: Criminal Intent, police detectives searched for a killer who murdered a judge and her family. Detectives suspected white supremacists. "Maybe we should put out an APB for somebody in a Tom DeLay T-shirt," one of the detectives said. The Texas Republican, the target of an ethics controversy who this year criticized the federal judiciary, wasn't amused. DeLay, in a letter to NBC Universal Television Group President Jeff Zucker, said the program is evidence of the embarrassing state of the media's credibility.
NEWS
April 29, 2005
HOUSE SPEAKER Dennis Hastert's decision to retreat this week on ethics changes apparently designed to protect his majority leader, Tom DeLay, was a bow to the inevitable. Republican rank-and-file members were hearing from constituents who may not give a fig about Tom DeLay or particular ethics requirements but detected an odor from Washington they didn't like. By giving in to demands from Democrats that unilateral changes in the bipartisan process be dropped, the speaker moved to take the wind out of a controversy that has overshadowed other House business and threatened to tar all of its members.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - For two decades, Rep. Tom DeLay has worked to build an empire on conservative ideals, bare-knuckle politics and an enormous talent for fund raising. Now, as controversy swirls around him, all those things are helping him keep his party together - and keep his job. Always a polarizing figure inside the Beltway, DeLay - the House Republican majority leader - is under fire for his fund-raising practices, his ties to lobbyists and his alleged ethical lapses in accepting foreign trips.
NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | April 24, 2005
YOU CAN'T entirely blame Tom DeLay for being annoyed and feeling abused. He is trapped in a Washington kabuki drama not of his own devising. Two different government investigations are looking into Mr. DeLay's relationship with a bunch of Indians he undoubtedly knew hardly at all and cared about even less. One of these investigations is asking whether he ripped off these Indians. The other is asking whether the same transactions amount to his Indians buying improper influence in a dispute with some other Indians.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - A legal defense fund established by Tom DeLay, the House majority leader, has sharply expanded its fund-raising effort in recent months, taking in more than $250,000 since the indictment last fall of two of his closest political operatives in Texas, according to DeLay's latest financial disclosure statements. The list of recent donors includes dozens of DeLay's House Republican colleagues, including two lawmakers who were placed on the House ethics committee this year, and several of the nation's largest corporations and their executives.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The leadership of the House and Senate reported progress last night after meeting to resolve an F-22 funding problem that had reached a stalemate.Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, a Mississippi Republican, summoned a high-powered group of lawmakers to his office yesterday, a day after conference committee negotiations broke down over how many of the Air Force fighter jets to buy with next year's military spending bill."We made a good breakthrough," House Majority Leader Dick Armey said after the nearly two-hour, closed-door session.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Seventeen-year-old Montrey Bowie of Frederick is poised to receive his high school equivalency degree in a few months, and he has an entry-level job lined up with a carpenters' union.But upon his 18th birthday at the end of the summer, federal law requires him to leave the foster care system and strike out on his own, with almost no money in hand."I don't want to live a fancy life," said Montrey, who noted he had been taken from his neglectful mother's home at an early age and briefly turned to dealing drugs after running away from indifferent foster parents.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 7, 2001
WASHINGTON -- With the House and Senate split on whether airport screeners should be federal employees or private company employees supervised by the feds, the blame game for not taking the necessary steps to prevent a future terrorist hijacking is already well under way. While congressional Democrats continue to press for full federalization and the Republicans hold out for the semi-private route, incidents like the one at O'Hare Airport in Chicago the...
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The leadership of the House and Senate reported progress last night after meeting to resolve an F-22 funding problem that had reached a stalemate.Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, a Mississippi Republican, summoned a high-powered group of lawmakers to his office yesterday, a day after conference committee negotiations broke down over how many of the Air Force fighter jets to buy with next year's military spending bill."We made a good breakthrough," House Majority Leader Dick Armey said after the nearly two-hour, closed-door session.
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