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Tom Davis

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BUSINESS
September 25, 2000
Sept. 14 Claude A. & Barbara J. Lemon, 35379 Wango Road, Pittsville, truck operators, jointly filed under Chapter 7. Assets: $82,690; liabilities: $355,897 Mammoth Sports Group Inc., 8005 Rappahannock Ave., Jessup, was involuntarily petitioned into a Chapter 7 filing by Kent Arett, J. Schmio & Associates and Professional Litho. Charles Thomas Davis, 445 Basil Ave., Chesapeake City, a.k.a. Tom Davis, a self-employed handyman, filed under Chapter 7.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
MASN, the TV home for Orioles baseball during the regular season, will offer pre- and post-game programs throughout the playoffs, Jim Cuddihy, the channel's executive vice president, said Friday. Cable channel TBS will carry all the games in the American League Divisional Series that starts Thursday. It will also carry the American League Championship Series. Fox has broadcast rights to the World Series. Postseason Orioles coverage on MASN will kick off with a one-hour special, "O's Xtra: Playoff Preview," at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
MASN, the TV home for Orioles baseball during the regular season, will offer pre- and post-game programs throughout the playoffs, Jim Cuddihy, the channel's executive vice president, said Friday. Cable channel TBS will carry all the games in the American League Divisional Series that starts Thursday. It will also carry the American League Championship Series. Fox has broadcast rights to the World Series. Postseason Orioles coverage on MASN will kick off with a one-hour special, "O's Xtra: Playoff Preview," at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | August 4, 2013
There was a message left on the office phone one cold night in 2001, but the caller didn't leave his name. It was just an old raspy voice wanting to say hi. I recognized the voice because I had heard him talk several hundred times, so I called him back to give him my regards. It was Art Donovan. Before I finished my introduction, he cut me off and started another conversation. "I know who you are, kid," said the Baltimore Colts' former Pro Bowl defensive tackle. "I read your stuff.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | March 19, 1999
PHOENIX -- Connecticut won the game, but Tom Davis took the night -- his last night, and his last game, as coach of the Iowa Hawkeyes.Forced to resign by athletic director Bob Bowlsby, Davis walked out of America West Arena last night after a 78-68 Sweet 16 defeat and into Hawkeyes history. He departs with 269 wins in 13 years at Iowa. He never reached the Final Four and made the Elite Eight once.He won, but not enough, and because of it endured a season unlike any other."I'm just sorting things out," Davis said after the West Regional semifinal loss.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | August 4, 2013
There was a message left on the office phone one cold night in 2001, but the caller didn't leave his name. It was just an old raspy voice wanting to say hi. I recognized the voice because I had heard him talk several hundred times, so I called him back to give him my regards. It was Art Donovan. Before I finished my introduction, he cut me off and started another conversation. "I know who you are, kid," said the Baltimore Colts' former Pro Bowl defensive tackle. "I read your stuff.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr | January 15, 1991
It came as little surprise to Delaware State coach Jeff Jones that his team beat host Morgan State last night, 87-79.What surprised him was the way it happened.Morgan State, winless and a loser by an average of more than 23 points a game, played aggressively and even held a one-point lead against the first-place Hornets midway through the second half before falling in the end."We figured we'd come in and play our game," said Jones, "but we just didn't have any gas tonight. I think we were awfully lucky."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 4, 1997
MARYLAND filmmaker Bruce Brown's "24-7" is a violent, ugly, sad journey through the drug-infested streets of Washington and a deeply disturbing tale of a family ripped apart by the whole poisonous mess.A film five years in the making, produced on a $250,000 budget, it suffers from the usual glitches in editing, uneven sound quality and failures in acting that mark a lot of independent films. And some people might want to dismiss it as another "black film" with a narrow, negative focus on life in the 'hood, a genre supposedly past its prime.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2002
Thomas F. Davis was a 32-year-old addict from White Marsh with a handful of drug convictions. Paul William Eubank was a 59-year-old family man from Rosedale who had organized Alcoholics Anonymous meetings for years. Their worlds collided Feb. 10, when Davis, high on a cocktail of cocaine, opiates and marijuana, drove his 1974 Dodge Dart off Kenwood Avenue, over a street sign, across a yard, through a porch and into Eubank. The older man had been taking a sandbag out of his Kenwood Avenue home, the home in which he and his wife had raised their two daughters and now played with their grandchildren, and he could not get out of the way of Davis' out-of-control car. It pinned him against his daughter's blue pickup, which he had borrowed and had left in the driveway.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 29, 2007
Let's get something straight right from the beginning. I'm generally not a big fan of sports-related congressional hearings, though I'll make an exception if they call one to examine the use of sports-related congressional hearings for blatantly political purposes. The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform is at it again, scheduling a hearing on baseball's steroid scandal for Jan. 15. This is largely the same committee that gave you the infamous March 17, 2005, hearing in which Rafael Palmeiro defiantly poked his finger at the assembled representatives and Mark McGwire nearly came to tears.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | October 2, 2011
Rafael Palmeiro strolled into the big sports memorabilia show at the Hilton Hotel in Pikesville Sunday wearing an orange sweater, jeans and a hip goatee that made him look like the bass player in a jazz band. He was nearly three hours late. His flight from Texas had been delayed. Mechanical problems, Palmeiro explained as a crowd quickly formed to have the former Orioles great sign baseballs and bats and whatever else was thrust in front of him. "First time back in Baltimore?" someone asked.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 29, 2007
Let's get something straight right from the beginning. I'm generally not a big fan of sports-related congressional hearings, though I'll make an exception if they call one to examine the use of sports-related congressional hearings for blatantly political purposes. The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform is at it again, scheduling a hearing on baseball's steroid scandal for Jan. 15. This is largely the same committee that gave you the infamous March 17, 2005, hearing in which Rafael Palmeiro defiantly poked his finger at the assembled representatives and Mark McGwire nearly came to tears.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2003
THE MARYLAND Republican Party had its most profitable night ever last week, thanks to a GOP governor in Annapolis and the big money that is following him. The party's 13th annual Red, White and Blue dinner attracted a crowd more than four times larger than in past years, its ranks swelled by many Democrats who are investing in what increasingly looks like a two-party state. "I understand there are many Democrats in the room tonight," Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. told the 900 guests at the Inner Harbor Hyatt who helped the GOP raise more than $500,000 in so-called soft money, which can be used on salaries, polling and party-building activities.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2002
Thomas F. Davis was a 32-year-old addict from White Marsh with a handful of drug convictions. Paul William Eubank was a 59-year-old family man from Rosedale who had organized Alcoholics Anonymous meetings for years. Their worlds collided Feb. 10, when Davis, high on a cocktail of cocaine, opiates and marijuana, drove his 1974 Dodge Dart off Kenwood Avenue, over a street sign, across a yard, through a porch and into Eubank. The older man had been taking a sandbag out of his Kenwood Avenue home, the home in which he and his wife had raised their two daughters and now played with their grandchildren, and he could not get out of the way of Davis' out-of-control car. It pinned him against his daughter's blue pickup, which he had borrowed and had left in the driveway.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2000
Sept. 14 Claude A. & Barbara J. Lemon, 35379 Wango Road, Pittsville, truck operators, jointly filed under Chapter 7. Assets: $82,690; liabilities: $355,897 Mammoth Sports Group Inc., 8005 Rappahannock Ave., Jessup, was involuntarily petitioned into a Chapter 7 filing by Kent Arett, J. Schmio & Associates and Professional Litho. Charles Thomas Davis, 445 Basil Ave., Chesapeake City, a.k.a. Tom Davis, a self-employed handyman, filed under Chapter 7.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | March 19, 1999
PHOENIX -- Connecticut won the game, but Tom Davis took the night -- his last night, and his last game, as coach of the Iowa Hawkeyes.Forced to resign by athletic director Bob Bowlsby, Davis walked out of America West Arena last night after a 78-68 Sweet 16 defeat and into Hawkeyes history. He departs with 269 wins in 13 years at Iowa. He never reached the Final Four and made the Elite Eight once.He won, but not enough, and because of it endured a season unlike any other."I'm just sorting things out," Davis said after the West Regional semifinal loss.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | October 2, 2011
Rafael Palmeiro strolled into the big sports memorabilia show at the Hilton Hotel in Pikesville Sunday wearing an orange sweater, jeans and a hip goatee that made him look like the bass player in a jazz band. He was nearly three hours late. His flight from Texas had been delayed. Mechanical problems, Palmeiro explained as a crowd quickly formed to have the former Orioles great sign baseballs and bats and whatever else was thrust in front of him. "First time back in Baltimore?" someone asked.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2003
THE MARYLAND Republican Party had its most profitable night ever last week, thanks to a GOP governor in Annapolis and the big money that is following him. The party's 13th annual Red, White and Blue dinner attracted a crowd more than four times larger than in past years, its ranks swelled by many Democrats who are investing in what increasingly looks like a two-party state. "I understand there are many Democrats in the room tonight," Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. told the 900 guests at the Inner Harbor Hyatt who helped the GOP raise more than $500,000 in so-called soft money, which can be used on salaries, polling and party-building activities.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 4, 1997
MARYLAND filmmaker Bruce Brown's "24-7" is a violent, ugly, sad journey through the drug-infested streets of Washington and a deeply disturbing tale of a family ripped apart by the whole poisonous mess.A film five years in the making, produced on a $250,000 budget, it suffers from the usual glitches in editing, uneven sound quality and failures in acting that mark a lot of independent films. And some people might want to dismiss it as another "black film" with a narrow, negative focus on life in the 'hood, a genre supposedly past its prime.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr | January 15, 1991
It came as little surprise to Delaware State coach Jeff Jones that his team beat host Morgan State last night, 87-79.What surprised him was the way it happened.Morgan State, winless and a loser by an average of more than 23 points a game, played aggressively and even held a one-point lead against the first-place Hornets midway through the second half before falling in the end."We figured we'd come in and play our game," said Jones, "but we just didn't have any gas tonight. I think we were awfully lucky."
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