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By Peter Watson | February 17, 1993
IT IS time to consider the cultural significance of Tom Cruise's nose. This, we can all agree, is a rare enough object -- but important? Although the question was to be answered today with the announcement of this year's Oscar nominations, its genesis needs some explanation.It started when the back-room crowd at Walt Disney, emboldened by the astonishing success of "Aladdin," made their pitch for glory. Their chief animator, Glen Keane, told Premiere magazine that he would "love to see an animated character nominated for Best Actor."
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NEWS
May 19, 2009
DVD Valkyrie ** (2 stars) Starring Tom Cruise. Directed by Brian Singer. Released by United Artists. $34.98 (Blu-Ray $39.95). Tom Cruise, who once could seemingly do anything in the movies, tries to revive his reputation, resuscitate United Artists and kill-off Adolf Hitler, all in the same movie. Valkyrie details -- that is, excruciatingly details -- a 1944 plot by a handful of enlightened German officers to assassinate the fuhrer. Had it been made 50 years ago, when exciting, star-studded World War II films were al l the rage, Valkyrie would have been filled with colorful performances, multiple climaxes and lots of stirring, bombastic music.
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FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | May 20, 1995
For filmmakers contemplating gorgeous Prague in the Czech Republic as a location, the message from Tom Cruise is: Don't bother.Mr. Cruise, on his first outing as a producer -- a movie version of "Mission Impossible," in which he stars -- recently ended three weeks of shooting in Prague believing he'd been unfairly overcharged for a location site. "At one point we were told, 'If you don't sign the papers by 4 p.m., you don't get the locale,' " said Katherine Orloff, the movie's publicity agent.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | May 7, 2008
IN A way he is a modern breed of film star. A man as interested in the business of show as he is in performance. An amalgam of magnetism and marketing savvy. Talented and shameless. A charming control freak. George Clooney minus the smugness. Arnold minus the skeeve. Tom Cruise minus the crazy. Ryan Seacrest, if Seacrest were a man." That's Alison Glock writing in Men's Journal about Dwayne Johnson, formerly known as pro wrestling's "The Rock" and later as a tight-jawed, heavily muscled action hero in over-the-top projects such as The Mummy Returns and The Scorpion King.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2002
NEW YORK -- Tom Cruise gazes at his interviewer. He supplies enthusiastic answers. But a half-hour with America's most bankable actor does not reveal much about the man. If you want more information, you probably have to be the family babysitter or orthodontist. The star of Cocktail, Jerry Maguire and the Mission Impossible series has come to a swanky hotel to promote Minority Report, the Steven Spielberg-directed thriller opening Friday. It's adapted from Philip K. Dick's short story about psychics in the near future who help the police arrest suspects before they commit their crimes.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 5, 2003
The Last Samurai is both insane and not insane enough. In this glossy period piece, Tom Cruise plays an American Army officer who picks a lunatic way to assuage his guilt over the atrocities of the Indian Wars. He joins the ranks of a master warrior (Ken Watanabe) who leads a samurai revolt against his own emperor's army and the forces of modernism in 1876 Japan. The moviemakers treat the moral equivalence of Indians and samurai as if it were the most natural thing in the world. Apart from using time-honored weapons like bows and arrows against technologically advanced armies, what do Indian tribes have in common with this remnant of medieval Japan?
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 16, 1999
"Eyes Wide Shut," the final film of director Stanley Kubrick, presents the late filmmaker's admirers with a tantalizing but ultimately confounding coda to one of the most formidable bodies of work in the cinema.The psychological portrait of a marriage at a pivotal moment, "Eyes Wide Shut" raises some fascinating questions about commitment, intimacy, sexuality and the power of imagination in relationships. And Kubrick's last gasp, which was bound to be a haunting final statement, will surely leave filmgoers with a lingering sense of the mysteries that abound in every emotional transaction.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 29, 2005
Forget what Tom Cruise does outside his movies: What he does inside his movies is more than enough to wreck them. He hides booby traps of self-absorption within a bundle of energy. Michael Mann brilliantly abstracted his go-getting persona into an affectless contract killer in Cruise's best star vehicle, Collateral. And at the start of War of the Worlds, Steven Spielberg and screenwriter David Koepp prod Cruise into using his goony effusiveness to portray a first-class - make that first-grade - idiot.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 4, 2006
In between its gut-crunching set pieces, Mission: Impossible III offers a terrible argument for staying in shape. Just by bringing a weary weightiness to the screen, Ving Rhames as the most uncomplicated good guy, Philip Seymour Hoffman as the most uncomplicated bad guy, and Laurence Fishburne as the most unlikable authority figure in the Impossible Mission Force steal scenes from their athletic star. They don't look as if they could eat Tom Cruise for lunch. They look as if they already have.
FEATURES
May 19, 2006
THE QUESTION Mission: Impossible III was tops at the box office, taking in $48 million, about $10 million less than Mission: Impossible II (its first week). And if you didn't go to see Tom Cruise in M:I:III , you could have seen him on cable or network television in his other movies Jerry Maguire, The Firm and Collateral. Is there too much hype around Cruise, whose odd behavior, belief in Scientology and relationship with fiancee Katie Holmes continue to make headlines? Some critics say he has turned off the American public, mostly women.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 14, 2008
Get ready! American Idol superstar Clay Aiken joins the Tony award-winning musical Monty Python's Spamalot, causing a line at the doors of the Shubert Theatre on West 44th Street beginning Friday. And he'll stick with this hilarious show through May 4. Director Mike Nichols: "Clay is amazing, beyond that glorious voice. Turns out he is an excellent comic actor and a master of character. People are going to be surprised by his wide-ranging talent, since the first impression is of great country charm and a singer to remember.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 9, 2007
The problem with Lions for Lambs isn't its political engagement but its cinematic disengagement. Robert Redford directs and stars in this ambitious talkathon, which would have been more effective as a radio play. Redford is all flashing teeth and conscience as a professor intent on pushing a gifted but complacent frat boy in his political-science class (Andrew Garfield) into some commitment to our civic life. Tom Cruise is all flashing teeth and cunning as a hotshot Republican senator shopping a scoop about a bold strategic change in Afghanistan to a seasoned journalist (Meryl Streep)
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | May 8, 2007
AS Queen Elizabeth II departs the United States today, she remains very much in the news. The now-famous Annie Leibovitz photograph of the queen published on the eve of her visit to the United States showed her sitting in bejeweled, be-satined, ermined and crowned splendor in the White Drawing Room at Buckingham Palace. In this photo, the queen is looking out an opened doorway. The photo is astonishing for its old-fashioned glamour and for its implied power. I couldn't think at first what this photograph reminded me of, certainly not the comparison made in Great Britain that the portrait resembled the queen's own mother back in 1939.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 13, 2006
Tom and Katie held hands like newlyweds while they watched the Washington Redskins from Daniel Snyder's box Monday night. No sign of the new baby, but it was just as well since Dan doesn't like to compete for attention. Of course, for those of you who don't spend your time in the grocery line flipping through Us and People, I'm referring to Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes, who became young Dan's new best friends when Tom signed a big production contract recently with a company controlled by Snyder.
BUSINESS
By Meg James and Sallie Hofmeister and Meg James and Sallie Hofmeister,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- Viacom Inc. Chairman Sumner Redstone was crowing Wednesday, the day after his harsh public dismissal of superstar Tom Cruise sent shivers through Hollywood and destroyed the feel-good spirit that had imbued his company's Paramount Pictures studio this summer. For Redstone, a bump in Viacom's stock price - however slight - outweighed any hangover in Hollywood his blunt remarks about one of Paramount's most bankable stars may have caused. Redstone said he was justly reassuring Wall Street that Paramount would not squander profits by overpaying stars in an effort to help lift Viacom's recently sagging stock price.
FEATURES
By PETER BART and PETER BART,VARIETY ENTERTAINMENT NEWS SERVICE | July 19, 2006
Memo to: Jerry Bruckheimer Knowing you, Jerry, you were embarrassed by last week's massive tribute in Variety as Showman of the Year. Even stars like Tom Cruise and Nicolas Cage took ads (we all know movie stars never pay for anything) and Disney's Dick Cook, the King of Understatement, called you his "cleanup hitter" - zealous praise coming from him. Your latest film is obliterating the record books, Jerry, but I've got to ask : Why didn't you knock an extra 30 minutes out of your big fat pirate movie?
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 9, 2007
The problem with Lions for Lambs isn't its political engagement but its cinematic disengagement. Robert Redford directs and stars in this ambitious talkathon, which would have been more effective as a radio play. Redford is all flashing teeth and conscience as a professor intent on pushing a gifted but complacent frat boy in his political-science class (Andrew Garfield) into some commitment to our civic life. Tom Cruise is all flashing teeth and cunning as a hotshot Republican senator shopping a scoop about a bold strategic change in Afghanistan to a seasoned journalist (Meryl Streep)
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 6, 2004
Actor Leonardo DiCaprio's declaration "I'm the king of the world!" in Titanic has been voted the cheesiest line in movie history, according to a survey of 2,000 British moviegoers, reports the BBC. Patrick Swayze's line in Dirty Dancing - "Nobody puts Baby in the corner" - came in second. "Is it still raining? I hadn't noticed," uttered by Andie MacDowell at the end of Four Weddings and a Funeral, was third. Fourth place belongs to Demi Moore in Ghost. "I love you," Swayze says, to which Moore replies: "Ditto."
NEWS
By ROBIN ABCARIAN and ROBIN ABCARIAN,LOS ANGELES TIME | July 2, 2006
Things got messy this week with the girlfriends on The View. What was supposed to be a carefully choreographed series of lies, told to save face, spare feelings and protect careers, devolved into a nasty catfight, leaving a veteran newswoman, Barbara Walters, in the position not only of having admitted lying, but of accusing her now-former co-host, Star Jones Reynolds, of lacking dignity for failing to lie about why she was leaving the show. Jones Reynolds, for her part, had already been slammed for (allegedly)
FEATURES
May 19, 2006
THE QUESTION Mission: Impossible III was tops at the box office, taking in $48 million, about $10 million less than Mission: Impossible II (its first week). And if you didn't go to see Tom Cruise in M:I:III , you could have seen him on cable or network television in his other movies Jerry Maguire, The Firm and Collateral. Is there too much hype around Cruise, whose odd behavior, belief in Scientology and relationship with fiancee Katie Holmes continue to make headlines? Some critics say he has turned off the American public, mostly women.
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