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By Dave Rosenthal | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy, whose death was announced today , almost single-handedly created the techno-thriller genre and some of his books, including "The Hunt for Red October," have become classics. The Baltimore author introduced complex military terms to millions of readers, in hefty books that ran hundreds of pages. But he never got lost in the alphabet soup of Pentagon and Kremlin acronyms. He created compelling characters such as Jack Ryan, who was played by Harrison Ford in movies such as "Clear and Present Danger" and "Patriot Games.
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NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Rumors often circulated that Tom Clancy's thrillers were so detailed in their descriptions of military and covert operations that the FBI had investigated the Baltimore novelist to determine his sources for works such as "The Hunt for Red October. " After Clancy's death in October 2013, The Baltimore Sun submitted a Freedom of Information Act request for any FBI files on Clancy. The FBI sent back 46 pages, including several redacted pages of background checks federal authorities had conducted.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 26, 2014
A Canton condominium owned by Baltimore author Tom Clancy is slated for settlement next month, according to court documents. The Clancy estate is the subject of a legal battle between his widow and the former executor. The 2,379-square-foot unit in the Canton Cove building on Boston Street came under contract for $660,000 in September.  The court approved a petition to sell the property Sept. 17, a day after attorneys for J.W. Thompson Webb sought permission for the deal.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 26, 2014
A Canton condominium owned by Baltimore author Tom Clancy is slated for settlement next month, according to court documents. The Clancy estate is the subject of a legal battle between his widow and the former executor. The 2,379-square-foot unit in the Canton Cove building on Boston Street came under contract for $660,000 in September.  The court approved a petition to sell the property Sept. 17, a day after attorneys for J.W. Thompson Webb sought permission for the deal.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | October 3, 2013
Tom Clancy, the Baltimore author who died this week at age 66, will be remembered as the king of the techno-thriller novel . But he also was a leading example of a modern day phenomenon: the author whose works spawn a hugely profitable, multi-media franchise. Clancy's books sparked Hollywood blockbusters such as "The Hunt for Red October," "Patriot Games" and “Clear and Present Danger.” They also were turned into video games such as "Ghost Recon" and the "Splinter Cell" series.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2010
As spacious as they are, Tom Clancy's three penthouse condos at the Ritz-Carlton Residences in Baltimore proved too small for the best-selling novelist. Now he has six. Clancy bought the additional properties this fall for almost $2.2 million, a fraction of what he paid per square foot just last year, according to state property records. The condos were among those that sold since the developer of the struggling upscale project, located alongside the Inner Harbor, lowered prices over the summer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy, the prolific Baltimore-born author whose novels "The Hunt for Red October" and "Patriot Games" inspired blockbuster movies and action-packed video games, earning him the nickname "king of the techno-thriller," died Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital after a brief illness. He was 66. "When he published 'The Hunt for Red October' he redefined and expanded the genre and as a consequence of that, a lot of people were able to publish such books who had previously been unable to do so," said Stephen C. Hunter, a Baltimore author and Pulitzer Prize-winning former film critic for The Washington Post.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Two young boys were charged with arson for allegedly setting a fire that destroyed an unoccupied home on the Calvert County estate of the late novelist Tom Clancy. The Office of the State Fire Marshal said Friday that the boys, who are 12 and 14 and from the Dares Beach community in Calvert County, confessed to igniting combustibles in the living room of the two-story, unoccupied wood frame house on the evening of Aug. 22. The fire was reported by a person passing by and was brought under control within 15 minutes of the arrival of firefighters, but the house was destroyed.
SPORTS
By Dean Jones Jr and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
The Orioles released a statement Wednesday afternoon with principal owner Peter G. Angelos' comments about best-selling author Tom Clancy, a minority owner for the team who died Tuesday at age 66 . The statement reads: For decades, Tom Clancy entertained millions with his novels and enjoyed producing no fewer than seventeen best-sellers. He was an extraordinary storyteller who had an ability to keep readers on the edge of their seats. His passion for the military was evident in his efforts to ensure that the men and women who serve our country were properly recognized for their service and commitment.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
The widow of Baltimore author Tom Clancy is battling her late husband's lawyer over $6 million in taxes she says she shouldn't owe on her share of Clancy's $82 million estate, which includes a World War II tank, a $65 million stake in the Orioles and a mansion on the Chesapeake Bay. Alexandra Clancy is seeking to oust Baltimore lawyer J.W. Thompson "Topper" Webb as executor of Tom Clancy's will, accusing Webb of a mistake that adds unnecessarily to...
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
The widow of Baltimore author Tom Clancy is battling her late husband's lawyer over $6 million in taxes she says she shouldn't owe on her share of Clancy's $82 million estate, which includes a World War II tank, a $65 million stake in the Orioles and a mansion on the Chesapeake Bay. Alexandra Clancy is seeking to oust Baltimore lawyer J.W. Thompson "Topper" Webb as executor of Tom Clancy's will, accusing Webb of a mistake that adds unnecessarily to...
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Two young boys were charged with arson for allegedly setting a fire that destroyed an unoccupied home on the Calvert County estate of the late novelist Tom Clancy. The Office of the State Fire Marshal said Friday that the boys, who are 12 and 14 and from the Dares Beach community in Calvert County, confessed to igniting combustibles in the living room of the two-story, unoccupied wood frame house on the evening of Aug. 22. The fire was reported by a person passing by and was brought under control within 15 minutes of the arrival of firefighters, but the house was destroyed.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Willard Hackerman collected maps and antique cars. Tom Clancy vacationed in Martha's Vineyard and drove a Cadillac. Art Donovan ran a Towson country club. The wills of Maryland's most affluent shed light on their wealth and, many times, their hobbies. They do not always show the full picture, though. In many cases, assets are steered into trusts that do not require public disclosure. Hackerman, the longtime chief executive of contracting behemoth Whiting-Turner who died last month, collected maps for more than 15 years.
NEWS
October 6, 2013
My wife and I were deeply saddened to learn of the death of our friend, Tom Clancy. The Tom Clancy we were privileged to know was kind and thoughtful to others, a devoted father, passionate and deeply loyal to his Orioles and native Baltimore. He gave generously to medical research at Johns Hopkins, was a genuine American patriot and friend to all those who serve in our armed forces and their families, was an expert student of military history and especially tactical and strategic command decisions, and had a unique and gifted imagination and ability to tell a story all the world could enjoy.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | October 3, 2013
Tom Clancy, the Baltimore author who died this week at age 66, will be remembered as the king of the techno-thriller novel . But he also was a leading example of a modern day phenomenon: the author whose works spawn a hugely profitable, multi-media franchise. Clancy's books sparked Hollywood blockbusters such as "The Hunt for Red October," "Patriot Games" and “Clear and Present Danger.” They also were turned into video games such as "Ghost Recon" and the "Splinter Cell" series.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy, whose death was announced today , almost single-handedly created the techno-thriller genre and some of his books, including "The Hunt for Red October," have become classics. The Baltimore author introduced complex military terms to millions of readers, in hefty books that ran hundreds of pages. But he never got lost in the alphabet soup of Pentagon and Kremlin acronyms. He created compelling characters such as Jack Ryan, who was played by Harrison Ford in movies such as "Clear and Present Danger" and "Patriot Games.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2004
In 1982, NBC first broadcast Family Ties and the nation first met Alex P. Keaton. The show was supposed to be about his parents -- ex-hippies Steve and Elyse who once protested the Vietnam War and volunteered in the Peace Corps. But it was their teenage son who quickly became the star of the show. Deftly played by Michael J. Fox, Alex was, of all things, a young conservative who hung a Richard Nixon poster on his bedroom wall and dreamed of making millions on Wall Street. "When else could a boy with a briefcase become a national hero?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy didn't realize he was forever changing the spy novel back in 1982, while working in obscurity on his first book, a Cold War thriller centering on the defection of a Soviet naval captain and the technologically advanced submarine he includes in the bargain. But then "The Hunt for Red October" was published, and things would never be the same - not for spy fiction, which was given new life by the detail-obsessed "techno-thriller" genre he invented, and certainly not for Clancy, who seemingly out of nowhere became one of the country's most prominent authors.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy, the prolific Baltimore-born author whose novels "The Hunt for Red October" and "Patriot Games" inspired blockbuster movies and action-packed video games, earning him the nickname "king of the techno-thriller," died Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital after a brief illness. He was 66. "When he published 'The Hunt for Red October' he redefined and expanded the genre and as a consequence of that, a lot of people were able to publish such books who had previously been unable to do so," said Stephen C. Hunter, a Baltimore author and Pulitzer Prize-winning former film critic for The Washington Post.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Tribune newspapers | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy, the Baltimore-born author whose novels "The Hunt for Red October" and "Patriot Games" subsequently inspired blockbuster movies and action-packed video games, died Tuesday after a brief illness at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 66. His lawyer, Thompson "Topper" Webb, of the Baltimore law firm of Miles & Stockbridge, confirmed his death. "When he published 'The Hunt for Red October' he redefined and expanded the genre and as a consequence of that, a lot of people were able to publish such books who had previously been unable to do so," said Stephen C. Hunter, an author and former Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic for The Washington Post.
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