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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1998
Toll roads and shared gas tax revenue will be on the Carroll County Commissioners' agenda today when they join their counterparts in Western Maryland for a quarterly county commissioners' meeting.Frustrated over the lack of major state road projects in Carroll, Commissioners Donald I. Dell and Richard T. Yates will broach the subject of toll roads to their colleagues from Allegany, Frederick, Garrett and Washington counties.What the Carroll pair will be looking for, said Commissioner W. Benjamin Brown, is to understand the consequences if Carroll were to build interstate-like highways as toll roads.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Bruce Gartner served as acting executive secretary of the Maryland Transportation Authority for seven months before being named permanently to the position last month. That was probably a good thing because the Annapolis resident needs to hit the ground running. The independent state agency, which owns and operates all of the state's toll roads, bridges and tunnels, is in the midst of a six-year, multibillion-dollar capital program and is gearing up to introduce major changes to the state's highway system, including new express toll lanes on Interstate 95 north of Baltimore.
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NEWS
July 8, 2007
More toll roads the wrong route After reading the article "I-95 changes rev up drivers" (July 1), I am shocked to see that people are accepting the idea of toll roads. Don't we pay enough taxes in this state!? I can't believe passing the cost on to us is the only way to make this happen. I can't be more opposed to the idea. In my opinion, they should add more roads (general purpose roads, not toll roads!) and try to find ways to add more public transportation in and around Baltimore City.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
The Maryland Transportation Authority has named Bruce W. Gartner its executive secretary, effective Dec. 11, following seven months of his acting in the role. Gartner, 48, temporarily filled the agency's top position in June for former executive Harold Bartlett, upon Bartlett's retirement. The MdTA is an independent state agency that owns and operates the state's toll roads, bridges and tunnels. The agency has 1,700 employees, including its own police force, an annual operating budget of $270 million and a six-year capital program of $2.2 billion.
NEWS
January 14, 1996
PRIVATE TOLL ROADS are making a comeback. In this nation's formative years, privately built and maintained routes abounded. Now that states and Washington are cash poor, risk-taking entrepreneurs are stepping foward again.So far, results are disappointing. The four-month-old Dulles Greenway is floundering. This 14-mile route, connecting Leesburg to Dulles airport, is often deserted, with just 10,000 cars a day instead of the projected 34,000. Revenues are a quarter of expectations.Unless owners renegotiate loans or find new investors, the Greenway could go broke.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
The Maryland Transportation Authority has named Bruce W. Gartner its executive secretary, effective Dec. 11, following seven months of his acting in the role. Gartner, 48, temporarily filled the agency's top position in June for former executive Harold Bartlett, upon Bartlett's retirement. The MdTA is an independent state agency that owns and operates the state's toll roads, bridges and tunnels. The agency has 1,700 employees, including its own police force, an annual operating budget of $270 million and a six-year capital program of $2.2 billion.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 22, 1998
PHILADELPHIA -- What if Pennsylvanians had been asked this question a decade ago:Should we tear down the tollbooths on the Pennsylvania Turnpike and let people drive free, or should we authorize new turnpike construction and raise the tolls?Is there any doubt what the outcome would have been?The Pennsylvania legislature did take up that question in 1985. To anyone familiar with the workings of the legislature and the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, the decision would be no surprise: Legislators voted to authorize construction and raise the tolls perpetuating a system that provides benefits for politicians and jobs for their friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,Sun Staff | March 27, 2000
Southern California motorists who get a hankering for a Big Mac will be getting real drive-through service soon. McDonald's has struck a deal with local highway officials to let customers at four Orange County restaurants pay for their meals automatically with the same radio transponders they use to pay tolls on local expressways. Elsewhere across the country, including Maryland, highway departments are using the same technology to ease congestion at toll plazas, create seamless interstate toll roads and make it easier for drivers to buy gas and goodies to go. In Orange County, McDonald's, SIRIT Technologies and the agency that oversees toll roads hope the 250,000 motorists who use the FasTrak electronic toll system will cooperate in an experiment that could be the next step toward a cashless future.
NEWS
By Peter Samuel | January 6, 2004
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr. is right to be moving forward vigorously on construction of the Intercounty Connector. He campaigned for the road and was elected, in part, on the promise to build it. It is a good project. It will enhance the economy and quality of life of Central Maryland, and it has overwhelming public support, as a recent poll shows. Unfortunately, his administration's idea of how to pay for the $1.7 billion road is quite wrong. As reported in The Sun Dec. 11, the Ehrlich team has floated the idea of issuing hundreds of millions of dollars in "grant anticipation revenue vehicle," or GARVEE, bonds to finance the ICC. Warren G. Deschenaux, director of the state's Office of Policy Analysis, is right in his claim that using the bonds would add greatly to the project's cost - perhaps $100 million.
NEWS
By Jake Stern | June 22, 2011
After hearing about the expected rises in tolls across Maryland, I couldn't help but think that Baltimore was hard hit while other areas of the state remained relatively unscathed. I'm talking, among other places, about D.C.'s northwestern suburbs. Montgomery and Howard counties are two of the richest counties in the U.S. and yet, somehow, there are no planned toll increases for them; in fact, before the construction of the Intercounty Connector, they had no toll roads at all. These areas of Maryland are the places where the residents and commuters can most easily afford increased tolls.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
On Memorial Day weekends, Kim Yates and Albert Kullman measure success by speed. Yates steers her bright yellow tow truck toward trouble, with the goal of getting disabled vehicles out of the roadway or back in business before traffic has time to clog. From his toll booth at the Bay Bridge, Kullman can make change for a $10 or $20 in under 12 seconds. "We want you on your way," Yates said. "Safely. " The summer season kicks off this weekend when 718,200 Marylanders are expected to leave town for the beach or mountains, 1.2 percent fewer than a year ago, according to AAA Mid-Atlantic.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
The days of getting a free pass at Maryland's toll plazas might soon come to an end for scofflaws who have been cheating without fear of penalty. The General Assembly will be asked to toughen the toll evasion law to include a $50 citation — and the possible suspension of vehicle registration. "That's the biggest hammer we could possibly have," said Harold Bartlett, executive director of the Maryland Transportation Authority, the agency that runs toll bridges, tunnels and roads.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
Lightly traveled and pothole-free, the newly opened Inter-County Connector is an invitation to speed, and that has become a sore spot with commuters. A review of the toll road's speed limit is under way and preliminary results and recommendations are expected in a month, said Doug Hutchinson, the Maryland Transportation Authority's chief engineer. The study will take into account the sharpness and bank of curves, sight distances and accident history on the road, formally known as Route 200. "There are a lot of facets that need to be checked out," Hutchinson said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
The final section of the Intercounty Connector will be open by 6 a.m. Nov. 22, according to Jack Cahalan, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Transportation. Previously, the state had not said exactly when the section would open. "The weather has played in our favor," Cahalan said. Construction on the toll road, which cost $2.6 billion, started in 2007. The ICC is currently open from Route 97 (Georgia Avenue) through Interstate 370, which feeds into Interstate 270, the main artery between Frederick and Washington.
NEWS
By Jake Stern | June 22, 2011
After hearing about the expected rises in tolls across Maryland, I couldn't help but think that Baltimore was hard hit while other areas of the state remained relatively unscathed. I'm talking, among other places, about D.C.'s northwestern suburbs. Montgomery and Howard counties are two of the richest counties in the U.S. and yet, somehow, there are no planned toll increases for them; in fact, before the construction of the Intercounty Connector, they had no toll roads at all. These areas of Maryland are the places where the residents and commuters can most easily afford increased tolls.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
In Google's world, the 41.9-mile trip from Baltimore to Gaithersburg takes all of 48 minutes along the brand-new Intercounty Connector. Just take Interstate 95 south, hop on the ICC and you're virtually there. But on planet Earth, most of the ICC hasn't opened yet. The 10 miles between I-95 and the Montgomery County high-tech hotbed is largely a muddy track where bulldozers are still doing what bulldozers do. Oops. In a textbook illustration of the computer adage "garbage in, garbage out," Google and another popular Web-based mapping service jumped the gun on the opening of the longest segment of Maryland's new $2.6 billion toll road by about a year.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
The days of getting a free pass at Maryland's toll plazas might soon come to an end for scofflaws who have been cheating without fear of penalty. The General Assembly will be asked to toughen the toll evasion law to include a $50 citation — and the possible suspension of vehicle registration. "That's the biggest hammer we could possibly have," said Harold Bartlett, executive director of the Maryland Transportation Authority, the agency that runs toll bridges, tunnels and roads.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Bruce Gartner served as acting executive secretary of the Maryland Transportation Authority for seven months before being named permanently to the position last month. That was probably a good thing because the Annapolis resident needs to hit the ground running. The independent state agency, which owns and operates all of the state's toll roads, bridges and tunnels, is in the midst of a six-year, multibillion-dollar capital program and is gearing up to introduce major changes to the state's highway system, including new express toll lanes on Interstate 95 north of Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2011
A few years ago, when Maryland's economy was cruising along and the tax money was rolling in, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman could count on receiving about $16 million a year from the state to keep local roads in good repair. But this year, like the year before, he didn't even get $500,000. And unless the state can tap into a new stream of money, things aren't looking much better for 2012. Howard County's story is typical of jurisdictions across Maryland. With the exception of Baltimore City, every jurisdiction in the state has seen its road repair money slashed by about 97 percent from levels in budget year 2007.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2011
Some of the exit signs still must be hung and guardrails installed, but other than that, Maryland's newest highway appears ready to carry its first traffic when the initial stretch of it opens next Tuesday. State transportation officials led reporters on a tour Tuesday of the 7-mile section of the Intercounty Connector between Georgia Avenue and Interstate 370 — the first leg of a toll road that in another year will connect Interstate 95 with the Interstate 270 corridor in Montgomery County.
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