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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2011
Traffic will again begin to flow smoothly along U.S. 40 between Harford and Cecil counties this summer, officials said, with completion of the $65 million reconstruction of the Hatem Bridge across the Susquehanna River. The three-year project has entered its fourth and final phase, which includes installation of a permanent barrier wall down the center of the 1.5-mile span, built more than 70 years ago for about $5 million. "We have about six months to go, depending on the weather," said Teri Moss, spokeswoman for the Maryland Transportation Authority.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Five state-owned toll bridges will be getting an $11 million security upgrade, including new lighting, sensors to detect stopped vehicles and cameras to peer above and below the spans. Work on the bridges — Bay, Key, Nice, Tydings and Hatem — is expected to begin in late winter and take 18 months. The contract went to SAIC, a Virginia company with offices in Laurel, said Maryland Transportation Authority spokeswoman Teri Moss. "This is a pretty big project for our signature bridges," Moss said.
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NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1999
Veronica Schwartz of Finksburg remembered the days when the bridge beneath her feet -- the Bay Bridge -- was just salty bay air. Those were the days when people had to drive all the way up to Newark, Del., and then down the Eastern Shore to get to Ocean City.Yesterday, after years of best intentions, the Carroll Countian walked the 4.3 miles across the bay in the annual opening of the Bay Bridge to pedestrians. Hand in hand with her grandsons, she recalled how Maryland has changed since she was their age -- before this bridge opened a more convenient door to the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2011
Traffic will again begin to flow smoothly along U.S. 40 between Harford and Cecil counties this summer, officials said, with completion of the $65 million reconstruction of the Hatem Bridge across the Susquehanna River. The three-year project has entered its fourth and final phase, which includes installation of a permanent barrier wall down the center of the 1.5-mile span, built more than 70 years ago for about $5 million. "We have about six months to go, depending on the weather," said Teri Moss, spokeswoman for the Maryland Transportation Authority.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | April 18, 1993
All things come to those who wait.Even the tollbooth on the Millard E. Tydings Memorial Bridge.After more than a half-hour of gut-wrenching, temper-boiling, anxiety-building, bumper-to-bumper, lurch-and-halt madness. On an Easter Sunday afternoon. With no place to turn around and no exit ahead, since the backup maniacally began just after the Aberdeen exit on Interstate 95. And, of course, no warning sign of the impending bottleneck. No State Police help. Just the kind of traffic foul-up that spoils holiday moods, appetites and family dinners.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
OLDTOWN -- The Oldtown toll bridge, a privately owned Potomac River crossing here in the mountains that the state closed in August because of safety concerns, could reopen as soon as next month, says its owner, who is making plans to repair the 58-year-old span.The one-lane wooden bridge, which links Oldtown with Green Spring, W.Va., across the North Branch of the Potomac River, is Maryland's only privately owned toll bridge -- remembered by many who have dropped the toll into a tin cup.Ray Miller, a Silver Spring contractor and a son-in-law of owner Frances Walters, said a Baltimore-area engineering firm is completing plans to repair the 317-foot-long bridge.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Five state-owned toll bridges will be getting an $11 million security upgrade, including new lighting, sensors to detect stopped vehicles and cameras to peer above and below the spans. Work on the bridges — Bay, Key, Nice, Tydings and Hatem — is expected to begin in late winter and take 18 months. The contract went to SAIC, a Virginia company with offices in Laurel, said Maryland Transportation Authority spokeswoman Teri Moss. "This is a pretty big project for our signature bridges," Moss said.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 3, 1995
OLDTOWN -- State officials closed yesterday the Oldtown Toll Bridge, the only privately owned toll bridge in Maryland and one of few in the United States, because of safety concerns.The 58-year-old wooden span, which links Oldtown with Green Spring, W. Va., across the north branch of the Potomac River, was closed because of "serious structural deficiencies" resulting from age and constant pressure from the river's flow, said Joseph Walter, chief engineer for the Maryland Public Service Commission.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2000
NEW CASTLE, Del. - The Delaware section of the highway starts here, at the western base of the Memorial Bridge amid a confusing welter of exits and entrances, fly-over ramps and directional signs. At the southern tip of the Philadelphia-Wilmington megalopolis, Interstate 295 South bends northwest to meet Interstate 95, the East Coast's high-speed Main Street. Heading south, in a little more than 12 miles, I-95 cuts across the thinnest part of Delaware, from the edges of ugly urban sprawl to carefully landscaped campuses of exurban office complexes and finally to forests and farmhouses near the Maryland line.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and michael.dresser@baltsun.com | December 1, 2008
Avoiding the purgatory that is Interstate 95 on a holiday weekend is not all that difficult if you're heading from Baltimore to the Northeast. Pennsylvania offers a wide choice of routes to scoot to the west of Philadelphia and invade New Jersey. Going south is more difficult.There aren't that many great options when you're heading to Richmond or beyond at peak travel times. The obvious route is to take the Capital Beltway to the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and follow I-95 south.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2000
NEW CASTLE, Del. - The Delaware section of the highway starts here, at the western base of the Memorial Bridge amid a confusing welter of exits and entrances, fly-over ramps and directional signs. At the southern tip of the Philadelphia-Wilmington megalopolis, Interstate 295 South bends northwest to meet Interstate 95, the East Coast's high-speed Main Street. Heading south, in a little more than 12 miles, I-95 cuts across the thinnest part of Delaware, from the edges of ugly urban sprawl to carefully landscaped campuses of exurban office complexes and finally to forests and farmhouses near the Maryland line.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1999
Veronica Schwartz of Finksburg remembered the days when the bridge beneath her feet -- the Bay Bridge -- was just salty bay air. Those were the days when people had to drive all the way up to Newark, Del., and then down the Eastern Shore to get to Ocean City.Yesterday, after years of best intentions, the Carroll Countian walked the 4.3 miles across the bay in the annual opening of the Bay Bridge to pedestrians. Hand in hand with her grandsons, she recalled how Maryland has changed since she was their age -- before this bridge opened a more convenient door to the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
OLDTOWN -- The Oldtown toll bridge, a privately owned Potomac River crossing here in the mountains that the state closed in August because of safety concerns, could reopen as soon as next month, says its owner, who is making plans to repair the 58-year-old span.The one-lane wooden bridge, which links Oldtown with Green Spring, W.Va., across the North Branch of the Potomac River, is Maryland's only privately owned toll bridge -- remembered by many who have dropped the toll into a tin cup.Ray Miller, a Silver Spring contractor and a son-in-law of owner Frances Walters, said a Baltimore-area engineering firm is completing plans to repair the 317-foot-long bridge.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 3, 1995
OLDTOWN -- State officials closed yesterday the Oldtown Toll Bridge, the only privately owned toll bridge in Maryland and one of few in the United States, because of safety concerns.The 58-year-old wooden span, which links Oldtown with Green Spring, W. Va., across the north branch of the Potomac River, was closed because of "serious structural deficiencies" resulting from age and constant pressure from the river's flow, said Joseph Walter, chief engineer for the Maryland Public Service Commission.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | April 18, 1993
All things come to those who wait.Even the tollbooth on the Millard E. Tydings Memorial Bridge.After more than a half-hour of gut-wrenching, temper-boiling, anxiety-building, bumper-to-bumper, lurch-and-halt madness. On an Easter Sunday afternoon. With no place to turn around and no exit ahead, since the backup maniacally began just after the Aberdeen exit on Interstate 95. And, of course, no warning sign of the impending bottleneck. No State Police help. Just the kind of traffic foul-up that spoils holiday moods, appetites and family dinners.
FEATURES
By Zeke Wigglesworth | October 17, 1993
STEVENSON, Wash. -- Once, when Lewis and Clark passed this way in the early 1800s, there was a vicious 10-mile stretch of rapids in this river gorge on the Washington-Oregon border. Now, there is a lake.The meanest part of those old rapids, a set of beastly rocks and turbulent caldrons called the Cascades, is buried under many feet of water, and where once humans risked life and limb to cross the mighty Columbia, there is a heavily traveled toll bridge.Still, the river gorge is immensely beautiful.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2004
Another round of torrential rain soaked much of Central Maryland last night, flooding roads and causing a scaffolding collapse that forced the closing of the Key Bridge. No one was injured when the scaffolding - set up by a painting crew - fell onto the roadway about 9:30 p.m., Maryland Transportation Authority Police said. But the toll bridge that carries the Baltimore Beltway across the mouth of the Patapsco River was shut down in both directions. No one could say last night when the bridge might reopen, but the painting contractor and bridge engineers were on their way to assess damage.
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